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COM, Registry, and Events for
HP OpenVMS Developer's Guide


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Part 3
OpenVMS Events

This part contains reference information about OpenVMS Events.


Chapter 15
OpenVMS Events

15.1 What are Events?

On a Windows system, an event is any significant occurrence in the system or an application---for example, a service starting or stopping, a user logging on or off, or accessing resources. When the system encounters an event, the Event Log service writes the event (or audit entry) in the form of a record that contains date and time, source, category, event number, user, and computer information to a system, security, or application log, creating an audit trail. On Windows systems, you display these logs and their recorded events using the Event Viewer.

With COM Version 1.1-B and higher for OpenVMS, OpenVMS supports both Windows logging and HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS logging of COM for OpenVMS events, and writes all COM for OpenVMS events to the DCOM$EVENTLOG.RPT text file. You can log a COM for OpenVMS event (such as the starting of a COM server on OpenVMS), and review these OpenVMS events from a Windows system or an OpenVMS system.

For a detailed review of OpenVMS Events dependencies and a description of how OpenVMS Events interacts with other parts of the OpenVMS infrastructure, see Section 4.10.

15.1.1 Suggested Reading

The following sources can provide you with more information on Events and related topics:

  • Third-party books on event logging:
    • Windows Server NT 4.0 Unleashed, Jason Garms, SAMS Publishing, Indianapolis, IN, 1998. ISBN: 0-672-30933-5.
    • Win32 System Services: The Heart of Windows 95 and Windows NT, Marshall Brain, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 1996. ISBN: 0-13-324732-5.
  • Other sources:
    • Microsoft Win32 Software Development Kit
      In particular, see the sections about the RegisterEventSource , ReportEvent , and DeregisterEventSource functions, and System Services: Event Logging section.

15.2 Overview of OpenVMS Events

The system logs OpenVMS Events to a Windows event log, to the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS event log, and to a log file on the OpenVMS system.

You can use the following techniques to view OpenVMS Events:

15.2.1 Viewing OpenVMS Events Using Windows Event Viewer

Use the following procedure to view OpenVMS Events through the Windows event viewer:

  1. Start the Windows event viewer.
    From the Start menu, select Programs, Administrative Tools, Event Viewer.
  2. From the Event Viewer window, click the menu bar Log option. Click Select Computer...., and select the OpenVMS system from the list box.
  3. From the Event Viewer window, click the menu bar Log option. Click System to display the System event log. The System event log contains the COM for OpenVMS events.
    To display COM for OpenVMS events only, use the following procedure:
    • From the Event Viewer window, click the menu bar View option. Click Filter Events....
      The system displays the Filter window.
    • On the Filter window, click the Source: list box. From the list, choose DCOM.

15.2.2 Viewing OpenVMS Events Using HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS Event Viewer

Use the following procedure to view the COM for OpenVMS events:

  1. Ensure that the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS is running.
  2. Enter the following HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS ADMINISTRATOR command:


      $ ADMIN SHOW EVENTS/TYPE=SYSTEM/SOURCE=DCOM/FULL
    

    The viewer displays COM for OpenVMS events only, along with any additional information associated with the COM for OpenVMS event.

15.2.3 Event Logging on OpenVMS Only

In some cases, you might want to write and view COM for OpenVMS events only on an OpenVMS system. In place of the Windows log, HP has included an alternate event logger that writes COM event information to an OpenVMS file. You can find this file in the following location:


SYS$MANAGER:DCOM$EVENTLOG.RPT

COM for OpenVMS creates this event logging report automatically when the COM server ( DCOM$RPCSS ) encounters an error. The event logger appends new events at the bottom (end) of the file. A logged event has the following format:


event type : ddd mmm dd hh:mm:ss yyyy
First event message

event type : ddd mmm dd hh:mm:ss yyyy
Second event message
.
.
.

Example 15-1 shows the contents of an event log.

Example 15-1 Sample OpenVMS Event Log

$ Type SYS$MANAGER:DCOM$EVENTLOG.RPT

(1)
ERROR : Tue Sep 15 11:18:54 1998
Unable to start a DCOM Server: {5E9DDEC7-5767-11CF-BEAB-00AA006C3606}
Runas (null)/SMITH
The Windows error: 1326
Happened while starting: device:[account]SSERVER.EXE

(2)
ERROR : Tue Sep 15 19:14:45 1998
The server {0C092C21-882C-11CF-A6BB-0080C7B2D682} did not register
with DCOM within the required timeout.

  1. The system logged the first error event on Tue Sep 15 11:18:54 1998. The COM server (DCOM$RPCSS) was unable to start the COM application device:[account]SSERVER.EXE on behalf of the client running under the SMITH account. (The client may have received an error such as "access denied.") The resulting Windows error was 1326 , which translates as "Logon failure: unknown user name or bad password."
    If you see this error, check the validity of the user account using the OpenVMS Authorize utility (AUTHORIZE).
  2. The system logged the second error event on Tue Sep 15 19:14:45 1998. The COM server (DCOM$RPCSS) was able to start the COM application {0C092C21-882C-11CF-A6BB-0080C7B2D682} , but the application did not run successfully. The application failed to register with DCOM$RPCSS within the specified time limit. (The client may have received an error such as "Server execution failed" CO_E_SERVER_EXEC_FAILURE. )
    If you see this error, run the server application interactively to determine its integrity.

NTA$EVENTW

Allows an application to record information in the event log files.

The NTA$EVENTW routine completes all operations synchronously.


Format

NTA$EVENTW [nullarg], func, itmlst, evsb


Arguments

nullarg


OpenVMS usage: reserved
type: longword (unsigned)
access: read only
mechanism: by value

Reserved for HP use.

func


OpenVMS usage: function_code
type: longword (unsigned)
access: read only
mechanism: by value

Function code specifying the function NTA$EVENTW is to perform. The func argument is a longword containing this function code. The $EVENTDEF macro defines the names of each function code.

itmlst


OpenVMS usage: address of item list
type: 64-bit address
access: read only
mechanism: by value

Item list specifying information about the event source or the event. The itmlst argument is the 64-bit address of a list of item descriptors, each of which describes an item of information. An item list in 64-bit format is terminated by a quadword of 0.

The following diagram shows the 64-bit format of a single item descriptor.


evsb


OpenVMS usage: address of status block
type: 64-bit address
access: write only
mechanism: by reference

Event status block to contain the completion status for the requested operation.

NTA$EVENTW sets the status block to 0 upon request initiation. Upon request completion, the EVT$L_VMS_STATUS field contains the primary (OpenVMS) completion status for the operation.

If an error occurs, EVT$L_NT_STATUS (if non-zero) is the secondary error status to further define the error condition. Function Codes

EVT$_FC_REGISTER_EVENT_SOURCE

Open an association with an event log.
Item code Required Parameter Data type
EVT$_SERVER_NAME No Input String (4-byte Unicode)
EVT$_SOURCE No Input String (4-byte Unicode)
EVT$_HANDLE Yes Output Unsigned longword
  • EVT$_SERVER_NAME
    The universal naming convention (UNC) name of the server on which this operation is to be performed.
    UNC names have the form \\server\share\path\file. This item must be zero or unspecified. This performs the operation on an available HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS server in the cluster.
  • EVT$_SOURCE
    The name of the application that logs the event. This field associates an application message file that contains descriptive text with the application's event log entries.
    If specified, the source must be a subkey of the Eventlog\System key, the Eventlog\Security key, or the Eventlog\Application registry key. For example, a source name of Myapp indicates a registry entry in the following:


    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\
       Services\Eventlog\Application\Myapp)
    

    The Myapp registry value EventMessageFile names the path and message file to be used to translate this application's events.
    The source can be unspecified or specified as NULL. In this case, the system logs events to the Application log file but the application logs no message file (and, as a result, no replacement text) for the associated events.
  • EVT$_HANDLE
    Returns a handle to the Application event log. This handle is required input for other $EVENT functions.
    On failure, a handle of 0 is returned. This handle is outside the responsibility of the CloseHandle API.

EVT$_FC_REPORT_EVENT

Generate an event log entry.
Item code Required Parameter Data type
EVT$_HANDLE Yes Input Unsigned longword
EVT$_EVENT_TYPE Yes Input Word mask
EVT$_EVENT_CATEGORY No Input Word
EVT$_EVENT_ID Yes Input Longword
EVT$_USER_SID No Input NT Security ID
EVT$_NUMSTRINGS No Input Word
EVT$_DATASIZE No Input Longword
EVT$_STRING_ARRAY No Input Array of varying-length descriptors. (4-byte Unicode)
EVT$_RAW_DATA No Input Binary data
  • EVT$_HANDLE
    Value returned by a previous EVT$_FC_REGISTER_EVENT_SOURCE call.
  • EVT$_EVENT_TYPE
    Indicates the severity of the event. The type is one of the following:
    EVT$_SUCCESS
    EVT$_ERROR
    EVT$_WARNING
    EVT$_INFO
    EVT$_AUDIT_SUCCESS
    EVT$_AUDIT_FAILURE

    The severity type maps to its Windows equivalent, defined in WINNT.H.
  • EVT$_EVENT_CATEGORY
    An integer value from 1 to 65535. EVT$_EVENT_CATEGORY is unique to a particular source.
    EVT$_EVENT_CATEGORY allows an application to divide its message file into sections, each indexed by event ID. If you do not specify a category, the system defaults to a category of zero.
  • EVT$_EVENT_ID
    An unlimited integer value. This value indexes the category in an application message file that locates the text string displayed for this event message. The event ID is unique to a particular source.
  • EVT$_USER_SID
    The optional Windows Security ID of the thread logging the event. An application that has acquired Windows credentials through the $PERSONA system service can obtain its SID through calls to the OpenProcessToken and GetTokenInformation Win32 APIs. The format is opaque to this service.
  • EVT$_NUMSTRINGS
    A count of the strings specified in the EVT$_STRING_ARRAY item code.
  • EVT$_DATASIZE
    Length in bytes of the buffer indicated by the EVT$_RAW_DATA item code.
  • EVT$_STRING_ARRAY
    An array of string pointers. Each entry points to a null terminated string. A description string in a message file can contain string placeholders in the form %n, where %1 indicates the first placeholder. Strings specified in this array replace these placeholders when the system displays the event message.
  • EVT$_RAW_DATA
    Allows you to include binary data in an event message.
    For example, you might use this to dump a data structure from a failing component.

EVT$_DEREGISTER_EVENT_SOURCE

Close an association with an event log.
Item code Required Parameter Data type
EVT$_HANDLE Yes Input Unsigned longword
  • EVT$_HANDLE
    Value returned by a previous EVT$_FC_REGISTER_EVENT_SOURCE call.
Item Codes
Item Code Parameter Type Data Type
EVT$_SERVER_NAME Input String
EVT$_SOURCE Input String
EVT$_HANDLE Input/Output Unsigned longword
EVT$_EVENT_TYPE Input Word mask
EVT$_EVENT_CATEGORY Input Word
EVT$_EVENT_ID Input Longword
EVT$_USER_SID Input NT security ID
EVT$_NUMSTRINGS Input Word
EVT$_DATASIZE Input Longword
EVT$_STRING_ARRAY Input Array of string pointers
EVT$_RAW_DATA Input Binary data
Description The NTA$EVENTW routine allows you to register and deregister an event source and report event data. This event logging allows you to record information from within an application. You can use the events routines to track progress within an application or identify problems encountered by an application.

The NTA$EVENTW routine completes synchronously; that is, control is returned to the caller only after the request completes.

Use the following process to write event data:

  1. Register the event source.
    This operation defines the event log to which the system writes event data.
  2. Report the event.
    This operation causes the system to write the information to the appropriate event log.
  3. Deregister the event source.
    This operation frees resources acquired as part of the event source registration operation.

Condition Values Returned

SS$_NORMAL Service completed successfully.
SS$_ACCVIO One of the arguments cannot be read/written.
SS$_BADPARAM Bad parameter.
SS$_NOPRIV Insufficient privilege to access the specified event log.
SS$_TIMEOUT Request timed out.
SS$_UNREACHABLE Events service unavailable.
SS$_REJECT The Windows LAN Manager server encountered an error. See the Win32 status for more information.

15.3 Writing Your Own Events

By default, the system logs DCOM events generated by COM for OpenVMS. In addition to recording COM for OpenVMS events, the system can also log COM application events for COM applications that you create.

The COM for OpenVMS kit includes sample code that shows how to generate an application event using Win32 APIs. You can use this example as is on a Windows system. The example also builds correctly using the instructions for building COM for OpenVMS applications on OpenVMS (to get the required header files from DCOM$LIBRARY). See Chapter 7 for these instructions. The example also includes the linking instructions to build the example using Wind/U.

15.4 Troubleshooting OpenVMS Events

Errors that occur during event reporting can be difficult to trace because of the number of intervening software layers through which the event passes. The following list describes how OpenVMS Events pass through other software layers until they are recorded in the Windows log.

  1. An application calls one of the Win32 event functions ( RegisterEventSource , ReportEvent , or DeregisterEventSource ).
  2. Using the supplied arguments, the Win32 API builds an appropriate item list and calls the NTA$EVENTW routine.
  3. The NTA$EVENTW routine validates the information supplied (function code, item list, and so on) and builds an appropriate item list for the SYS$ACM system service.
    If NTA$EVENT detects any errors NTA$EVENT returns the errors to the Win32 API using R0 and the event status block.
  4. The SYS$ACM system service validates the information and passes it to the NT ACME.
    If SYS$ACM detects any errors, SYS$ACM returns the errors to NTA$EVENTW using R0 and the ACM status block..
  5. The NT ACME passes the supplied information (using an IPC pipe) to a dispatcher in the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS.
    If the NT ACME detects any errors, the NT ACME returns the errors to the caller using the ACM status block.
  6. The HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS dispatcher validates the information and calls the appropriate routines to perform the requested operation (register, report, or deregister).
    If the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS detects any errors, it reports the errors to the NT ACME. The NT ACME passes the errors back to the other callers.

Checking the contents of the event status block help you determine where the failure might have happened. Table 15-1 lists (in order of importance) the checks you should perform.

Table 15-1 Troubleshooting OpenVMS Events Failures
R0 Status Status Field Value Component to Check
Failure (bit 0 clear) EVT$L_NT_STATUS field is nonzero. Error most likely occurred within HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS.
Failure EVT$L_VMS_STATUS field is nonzero and the EVT$L_NT_STATUS is zero. Error most likely occurred within the SYS$ACM system service or the NT ACME.
Failure EVT$L_VMS_STATUS is zero and EVT$L_NT_STATUS is zero. Error most likely occurred within the SYS$ACM system service.

Note

The Win32 API usually converts the error status to an appropriate NT error status code and makes it available through the GetLastError Win32 API. (The status returned by the event API simply indicates a generic failure.)


Part 4
Appendixes

This part contains reference information about COM for OpenVMS and the OpenVMS Registry.

The appendixes provide information about the MIDL compiler, troubleshooting tips, COM sample code, running COM for OpenVMS in an unauthenticated environment, and APIs and interfaces.

This part also includes a glossary and a list of acronyms.


Appendix A
MIDL Compiler Options

A.1 Mode

Switch Use
/ms_ext Microsoft extensions to the IDL language (default)
/c_ext Allow Microsoft C extensions in the IDL file (default)
/osf OSF mode - disables /ms_ext and /c_ext options
/app_config Allow selected ACF attributes in the IDL file
/mktyplib203 MKTYPLIB Version 2.03 compatibility mode

A.2 Input

Switch Use
/acf filename Specify the attribute configuration file
/I directory-list Specify one or more directories for include path
/no_def_idir Ignore the current and the INCLUDE directories

A.3 Output File Generation

Switch Use
/client none Do not generate client files
/client stub Generate client stub file only
/out directory Specify destination directory for output files
/server none Generate no server files
/server stub Generate server stub file only
/syntax_check Check syntax only; do not generate output files
/Zs Check syntax only; do not generate output files
/old Generate old format type libraries
/new Generate new format type libraries

A.4 Output File Names

Switch Use
/cstub filename Specify client stub file name
/dlldata filename Specify dlldata file name
/h filename Specify header file name
/header filename Specify header file name
/iid filename Specify interface UUID file name
/proxy filename Specify proxy file name
/sstub filename Specify server stub file name
/tlb filename Specify type library file name

A.5 C Compiler and Preprocessor Options

Switch Use
/cpp_cmd cmd_line Specify name of C++ preprocessor
/cpp_opt options Specify additional C++ preprocessor options
/D name[=def] Pass #define name, optional value to C++ preprocessor
/no_cpp Turn off the C++ preprocessing option
/nocpp Turn off the C++ preprocessing option
/U name Remove any previous definition (undefine)

A.6 Environment

Switch Use
/char signed C++ compiler default char type is signed
/char unsigned C++ compiler default char type is unsigned
/char ascii7 Char values limited to 0-127
/dos Target environment is MS-DOS client
/env dos Target environment is MS-DOS client
/env mac Target environment is Apple Macintosh
/env powermac Target environment is Apple PowerMac
/env win16 Target environment is Microsoft Windows 16-bit (Win 3.x)
/env win32 Target environment is Microsoft Windows 32-bit (NT)
/mac Target environment is Apple Macintosh
/ms_union Use Midl 1.0 non-DCE wire layout for non-encapsulated unions
/oldnames Do not mangle version number into names
/powermac Target environment is Apple PowerMac
/rpcss Automatically activate rpc_sm_enable_allocate
/use_epv Generate server side application calls via entry-pt vector
/no_default_epv Do not generate a default entry-point vector
/prefix client str Add "str" prefix to client-side entry points
/prefix server str Add "str" prefix to server-side manager routines
/prefix switch str Add "str" prefix to switch routine prototypes
/prefix all str Add "str" prefix to all routines
/win16 Target environment is Microsoft Windows 16-bit (Win 3.x)
/win32 Target environment is Microsoft Windows 32-bit (NT)

A.7 Error and Warning Messages

Switch Use
/error none Turn off all error checking options
/error allocation Check for out of memory errors
/error bounds_check Check size vs transmission length specification
/error enum Check enum values to be in allowable range
/error ref Check ref pointers to be non-null
/error stub_data Emit additional check for server side stub data validity
/no_warn Suppress compiler warning messages

A.8 Optimization

Switch Use
/align {1|2|4|8} Designate packing level of structures
/pack {1|2|4|8} Designate packing level of structures
/Zp{1|2|4|8} Designate packing level of structures
/Oi Generate fully interpreted stubs
/Oic Generate fully interpreted stubs for standard interfaces and stubless proxies for object interfaces as of NT 3.51 release
/Oicf Generate fully interpreted stubs with extensions and stubless proxies for object interfaces as of NT 4.0 release
/Os Generate inline stubs
/hookole Generate HookOle debug info for local object interfaces

A.9 Miscellaneous

Switch Use
@response_file Accept input from a response file
/? Display a list of MIDL compiler switches
/confirm Display options without compiling MIDL source
/help Display a list of MIDL compiler switches
/nologo Suppress displaying of the banner lines
/o filename Redirects output from screen to a file
/W{0|1|2|3|4} Specify warning level 0-4 (default = 1)
/WX Report warnings at specified /W level as errors


Appendix B
Troubleshooting

B.1 RPC Troubleshooting

When you perform a significant number of simultaneous NTLM authentications, the following errors are likely to occur. Several factors affect the number of simultaneous NTLM authentications, however, you are most likely to see these errors when the network is congested or when the RPC application server does not respond to requests in a timely manner. The errors are returned as standard RPC application return values.

Table B-1 provides a description of the suspected cause and possible workarounds.

Table B-1 RPC Errors
Error Cause/Corrective Actions
RPC_S_CONNECTION_REJECTED This error is seen by the client application as an exception when using either DECnet Phase IV or DECnet Phase V as a transport and when the server is heavily loaded servicing other DECnet clients.

The system returns this error when the client RPC run time binds to a newly created socket and the socket call returns error 61 (connection refused).

Possible solutions:

  1. Raise DECnet resource quotas.
  2. Enhance the client RPC program to catch the exception and either retry the RPC or choose a different server.
RPC_S_CONNECTION_TIMED_OUT This error is seen by the client application as an exception when using TCP or DECnet as a transport and when the server is heavily loaded.

The system returns this error when the client RPC run time binds to a newly created socket and the server takes too long to either accept or reject the connection.

Possible solutions:

  1. Configure TCP or DECnet to wait longer before sockets time out.
  2. Enhance the RPC client application to call rpc_mgmt_set_com_timeout() and instruct the RPC run time to retry when it gets this socket error.
  3. Recode the client RPC program to catch the exception and either retry the RPC or choose a different server.
RPC_S_ASSOC_SHUTDOWN This error is seen by the client application as an exception when using TCP or DECnet as a transport and when the client is heavily loaded (usually when the client is also an RPC server).

After an RPC server receives an RPC_BIND packet from a client and the server sends back an RPC_BIND_ACK packet to the client, the server expects to receive a REQUEST packet within 12 seconds. If the client does not send the REQUEST packet within 12 seconds, the RPC server deletes the association and sends a SHUTDOWN packet to the client. The client RPC run time raises an exception to the RPC application.

This scenario is likely to occur when the client RPC application is also acting as an RPC server and that RPC server is already heavily loaded.

Possible solutions:

  1. Implement the client RPC program to catch the exception and either retry the RPC or choose a different server.
RPC_S_COMM_FAILURE

This error is seen by the client application as an exception when using DG (UDP) as a transport and when the RPC server is heavily loaded.

The RPC client sends a REQUEST packet to the server. If the client does not get a WORKING packet response from the server within 30 seconds, the client sends a PING packet to the server to see if the server is still active and working on the client's request. If the RPC server is under heavy load, the server may not return the WORKING packet to the client before the client times out.

Possible solutions:

  1. RPC client application can call rpc_mgmt_set_com_timeout() to instruct the RPC run time to wait longer than 30 seconds before timing out.
  2. Implement the client RPC program to catch the exception and either retry the RPC or choose a different server.

B.2 Troubleshooting the ACME server

Use the following procedure to troubleshoot problems with the ACME server:

  1. Verify that the ACME_SERVER process is running (use the SHOW SERVER ACME command) and verify there is a connection between the MSV1_0 ACME agent and the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS process.
  2. If no connection exists, verify that the PWRK$ACME_SERVER logical name contains the SCS node names of systems in the cluster that are running the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS process.
  3. If the PWRK$ACME_SERVER logical name is defined correctly, verify that the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS process is running on the systems specified (look for the PWRK$LMSRV process).
  4. If authentications are failing, check the following:
    • Interdomain authentication (EASTOSHKOSK\JOE) requires trust relationships. Use the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS ADMINISTER ADD TRUST[/TRUSTED] or [/PERMITTED] command to establish the desired trust relationships between two domains.
    • Windows passwords are case sensitive. Be sure you have entered the passwords using the correct case.
    • Windows user either has no OpenVMS hostmap account or maps to an invalid OpenVMS account (the default UAF mapping is PWRK$DEFAULT, which has DISUSER flag set). Use the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS ADMINISTER ADD HOSTMAP command to map the Windows user name to a valid OpenVMS account.
    • Windows user account is invalid, expired, disabled, or has an invalid password. Use the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS ADMINISTER SHOW USER/FULL command to display the complete user account information. Use the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS ADMINISTER SHOW ACCOUNT POLICY command to display the domain policy information.
    • OpenVMS account does not have EXTAUTH flag set. In AUTHORIZE, use the UAF utility MODIFY user-name/FLAG=EXTAUTH command. (You can override this requirement by setting the IGNORE_EXTAUTH bit (bit number 11 [decimal]) in the SECURITY_POLICY system parameter.)
    • UAF record flag is set to DISUSER. In AUTHORIZE, use the UAF utility MODIFY user-name/FLAG=NODISUSER command.
    • UAF record modal restrictions prevent "login" (check local dialup, remote, network, and batch access restrictions). In AUTHORIZE, use the UAF utility MOD user-name/LOCAL (or DIALUP, BATCH, NETWORK,REMOTE) keywords; INTERACTIVE sets LOCAL, DIALUP, and REMOTE access restrictions.
    • Intrusion subsystem has entered break-in evasion mode because the number of failed logins has exceeded the system threshold (set by SYSGEN parameter LGI_BRK_LIM). Use the SHOW INTRUSION command to view the intrusion database. Use the DELETE/INTRUSION source command to remove entries from the database. If the LGI_BRK_DISUSER is set, the UAF record may be set to DISUSER. Use the OpenVMS AUTHORIZE command to reset the flag.

B.3 Troubleshooting the DCOM$RPCSS Process

The DCOM$RPCSS process must be running to run any COM for OpenVMS applications on your OpenVMS system. The DCOM$STARTUP.COM command file is automatically starts this process. If you have problems running COM for OpenVMS applications, check that this process is running. Use the following command:


  $ SHOW SYSTEM

If the process is initializing, the process name is DCOM$STARTUP-**. If the process is in its normal running state, the process name is be DCOM$RPCSS.

Check the SYS$MANAGER:DCOM$RPCSS.OUT log file for error messages from the DCOM$RPCSS process. The messages can include the following:

  • %ACME-E-PWDEXPIRED, password has expired
    If the DCOM$RPCSS log file contains this error, do the following:
    1. Run the HP Advanced Server for OpenVMS ADMIN utility and to change the password of the DCOM$RPCSS account. See Section 6.2.1.
    2. Update the COM for OpenVMS Service Control Manager password file. See Section 6.2.1.

B.4 Troubleshooting the Advanced Server for OpenVMS

The Advanced Server for OpenVMS must be running to authenticate users with credentials.

A troubleshooter may wish to enable the audit policy to capture failures for logonoff and system events. For example, on systems running Advanced Server for OpenVMS, issue the command:


    $ ADMINISTER SET AUDIT POLICY/AUDIT/FAILURE=(LOGONOFF,SYSTEM)

To monitor events, issue the commands:


    $ ADMINISTER SHOW EVENT /FULL /TYPE=SYSTEM
    $ ADMINISTER SHOW EVENT /FULL /TYPE=SECURITY

For more information, the Advanced Server for OpenVMS Server Administrator's Guide provides a chapter on Monitoring Events and Troubleshooting.

Additionally, the system manager may want to check the system operator log, SYSMANAGER:OPERATOR.LOG, to verify that no network errors have occurred.

B.5 Troubleshooting COM for OpenVMS Application Failures

This section describes problems you may encounter when running a COM application.

B.5.1 Access Denied Failures

For information on access denied failures, see Section 5.4.6.


Appendix C
Cookbook Examples: Building a Sample Application on OpenVMS

Note

SAMPLE1 and DISPATCH_SAMPLE1 are taken from Dale Rogerson's book, Inside COM, published by Microsoft Press.

C.1 COM Example (Sample1)

This example implements a COM client and server in which the component provides two interfaces: IX and IY . The client also queries the component for a third interface, IZ , an interface that the component does not provide.

This example demonstrates connectivity between two OpenVMS systems, between two Windows systems, or between an OpenVMS system and a Windows system.

Note

Before you build the application on OpenVMS, you must run NTA$LOGON and acquire Windows credentials. For more information, see Section 8.2.

C.1.1 OpenVMS Instructions

The following sections describe how to build the application on an OpenVMS system.

C.1.1.1 Building the Application on OpenVMS

Copy files from the DCOM examples directory to your local directory. For example:


   $ set default mydisk:[mydirectory]
   $ copy dcom$examples:[sample1]*.* []

To build the application, run the following command procedure:


   $ @build_sample1

If you have MMS, you can use the included description file as follows:


   $  MMS/DESCRIPTION=BUILD_SAMPLE1.MMS

The BUILD file builds and registers both the in-process and out-of-process servers.

C.1.1.2 Registering the Application on OpenVMS

The build procedure automatically registers both DISPCMPNT$SHR.EXE and DISPCMPNT.EXE . To register the components manually, use the following procedure:

  • To register the in-process server, use the REGSVR32 utility as follows:


      $ regsvr32 :== $DCOM$REGSVR32.EXE
      $ regsvr32 path-nameDISPCMPNT$SHR.EXE
    
  • To unregister the in-process server, use the REGSVR32 utility as follows:


      $ regsvr32 /u path-nameDISPCMPNT$SHR.EXE
    
  • To register the out-of-process server:


      $ dispcmpnt :== $path-nameDISPCMPNT.EXE
      $ dispcmpnt /regserver
    
  • To unregister the out-of-process server:


      $ dispcmpnt /unregserver
    
  • To register the Proxy Stub, use the REGSVR32 utility as follows:


      $ regsvr32 path-namePROXY$SHR.EXE
    
  • To unregister the Proxy Stub, use the REGSVR32 utility as follows:


      $  regsvr32 /u path-namePROXY$SHR.EXE
    

C.1.1.3 Running the Application on OpenVMS as an Out-of-Process Server

To run the sample where the component is an out-of-process server, run DISPCMPNT.EXE . When the system displays the Server: Waiting message from the component, run the client in a separate window or terminal session.

  • Window (or terminal session) 1:


       $ run dispcmpnt
    
  • Window (or terminal session) 2:


       $ client :== $path-nameCLIENT.EXE
       For OutProc:
       $ client
       2
       $
    

The client displays the following:


  To which server do you want to connect?
   1) In-Process Server
   2) Out-of-Process Server
   :

Enter 2 to select the out-of-process server.

C.1.1.4 Running the Application on OpenVMS and Specifying a Remote Server

Run DISPCMPNT.EXE on the system you designate as the remote machine (or server system). The remote system can also be a Windows system. When you receive the Server: Waiting message from the component, run the client on the system you designate as the local machine (or client system). For example:


   $ client :== $path-nameCLIENT.EXE
   $ client remote-system-name
   2
   $

The client displays the following:


  To which server do you want to connect?
   1) In-Process Server
   2) Out-of-Process Server
   :

Enter 2 to select remote server execution, out-of-process server.

C.1.1.5 Running the Application on OpenVMS as an In-Process Server

To run the sample where the component is an in-process server, run only the client. For example:


   For InProc:
   $ client
   1
   $

The client displays the following:


  To which server do you want to connect?
   1) In-Process Server
   2) Out-of-Process Server
   :

Enter 1 to select the in-process server.

C.1.2 Windows Instructions

The following sections describe how to build the application on a Windows system.

Note

In order to build Visual C++ applications from a DOS window, you must first set up a number of environment variables. If you did not select the option to have these variables set up automatically when you installed Visual C++, you will need to set them up each time you create a DOS window. To set up these variables, execute the file


C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio\VC98\BIN\VCVARS32.BAT

C.1.2.1 Building the Application on Windows

Copy the README-SAMPLE1.TXT file and the following files from the COM examples directory to your Windows system:


   CLIENT.CXX
   CMPT.CXX
   CMPT.DEF
   MAKE-ONE.
   MAKEFILE.BAT
   PROXY.DEF
   REGISTRY.CXX
   REGISTRY.H
   SERVER.IDL

Build the sample using the MAKEFILE.BAT file. For example:


   > MAKEFILE

The Makefile builds and registers both the in-process and out-of-process servers.

C.1.2.2 Registering the Application on Windows

The build procedure make-one automatically registers DISPCMPNT.DLL , PROXY.DLL , and CMPNT.EXE as follows:


   regsvr32 -s Dispcmpnt.dll
   regsvr32 -s Proxy.dll
   Dispcmpnt /RegServer

To unregister the application, enter the following:


   regsvr32 -u Dispcmpnt.dll
   regsvr32 -u Proxy.dll
   Dispcmpnt /UnRegServer

C.1.2.3 Running the Application on Windows

Run CLIENT . Follow the same procedure as described for OpenVMS for running the application as an in-process server ( Section C.1.1.5) and out-of-process server Section C.2.1.3).

Use the name of a remote machine (UNC or DNS) as an argument to instantiate the object on the remote machine. For example:


   >Client hostname        ! point the client at the remote system
   2                       ! means outproc invocation
   >

C.2 Automation Example (Dispatch_Sample1)

This example implements the Automation component server as a dual interface. There are two separate clients: Dclient , which connects to the dual interface through the dispinterface, and Client , which is a COM client implementation that connects through the IUnknown interface (using a v-table).

This example demonstrates connectivity between two OpenVMS systems, between two Windows systems, or between an OpenVMS system and a Windows system.

C.2.1 OpenVMS Instructions

The following sections describe how to build the application on an OpenVMS system.

C.2.1.1 Building the Application on OpenVMS

Copy files from the DCOM examples directory to your local directory. For example:


   $ set default mydisk:[mydirectory]
   $ copy dcom$examples:[dispatch_sample1]*.* []

To build the application, run the following command procedure:


   $ @build_dispatch_sample1

If you have MMS, you can use the included description file as follows:


   $  MMS/DESCRIPTION=BUILD_DISPATCH_SAMPLE1.MMS

The BUILD file builds and registers both the in-process and out-of-process servers.

C.2.1.2 Registering the Application on OpenVMS

The build procedure automatically registers both DISPCMPNT$SHR.EXE and DISPCMPNT.EXE . To register the components manually, use the following procedure:

  • To register the in-process server, use the REGSVR32 utility as follows:


      $ regsvr32 :== $DCOM$REGSVR32.EXE
      $ regsvr32 path-nameDISPCMPNT$SHR.EXE
    
  • To unregister the in-process server, use the REGSVR32 utility as follows:


      $ regsvr32 /u path-nameDISPCMPNT$SHR.EXE
    
  • To register the out-of-process server:


      $ dispcmpnt :== $path-nameDISPCMPNT.EXE
      $ dispcmpnt /regserver
    
  • To unregister the out-of-process server:


      $ dispcmpnt /unregserver
    

C.2.1.3 Running the Application on OpenVMS as an Out-of-process Server

To run the sample where the component is an out-of-process server, run DISPCMPNT.EXE .

When the system displays the Server: Waiting message from the component, run the client in a separate window or terminal session.

  • Window (or terminal session) 1:


       $ run dispcmpnt
    
  • Window (or terminal session) 2:
    • For dispatch client:


         $ run dclient
      
    • For COM client:


         $ run client
      

The client displays the following:


  To which server do you want to connect?
   1) In-Process Server
   2) Out-of-Process Server
   :

Enter 2 to select the out-of-process server.

C.2.1.4 Running the Application on OpenVMS and Specifying a Remote Server

Run DISPCMPNT.EXE on the system you designate as the remote machine (or server system). The remote system can also be a Windows system. When you receive the Server: Waiting message from the component, run the client on the system you designate as the local machine (or client system). For example:

To use the COM client, enter the following:


   $ client :== $path-nameCLIENT.EXE
   $ client remote-system-name
  To which server do you want to connect?
   1) In-Process Server
   2) Out-of-Process Server
   :

Enter 2 to select remote server execution, out-of-process server.

C.2.1.5 Running the Application on OpenVMS as an In-Process Server

To run the sample where the component is an in-process server, run only the client. For example:

  • For dispatch client:


       $ run dclient
    
  • For COM client:


       $ run client
    

The client displays the following:


  To which server do you want to connect?
   1) In-Process Server
   2) Out-of-Process Server
   :

Enter 1 to select the in-process server.

C.2.2 Windows Instructions

The following sections describe how to build the application on a Windows system.

Note

In order to build Visual C++ applications from a DOS window, you must first set up a number of environment variables. If you did not select the option to have these variables set up automatically when you installed Visual C++, you will need to set them up each time you create a DOS window. To set up these variables, execute the file


C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio\VC98\BIN\VCVARS32.BAT

C.2.2.1 Building the Application on Windows

Copy the README-DISPATCH-SAMPLE1.TXT file and the following files from the COM examples directory to your Windows system:


   CLIENT.CXX
   DCLIENT.CXX
   DISPCMPNT.CXX
   DISPCMPNT.DEF
   DISPCMPNT.IDL
   MAKE-ONE.
   MAKEFILE.BAT
   REGISTRY.CXX
   REGISTRY.H

Build the sample using the MAKEFILE.BAT file. For example:


   C:> MAKEFILE

The Makefile builds and registers both the in-process and out-of-process servers.

C.2.2.2 Registering the Application on Windows

The build procedure make-one automatically registers DISPCMPNT.DLL , PROXY.DLL , and DISPCMPNT.EXE as follows:


   regsvr32 -s Dispcmpnt.dll
   Dispcmpnt /RegServer

To unregister the application, enter the following:


   regsvr32 -u Dispcmpnt.dll
   Dispcmpnt /UnRegServer

C.2.2.3 Running the Application on Windows

Run DCLIENT or CLIENT . Follow the same procedure as described for OpenVMS for running the application as an in-process server ( Section C.2.1.5) and an out-of-process server ( Section C.2.1.3).

Use the name of a remote machine (UNC or DNS) as an argument to instantiate the object on the remote machine.

C.3 Cross-Domain Security Example (CLIENTAUTH)

This example shows how you can authenticate a remote client that is not in the server's domain or in a domain that has a trust with the server's domain. The client must pass to this application the credentials (user name, domain and password) of an account on the server's domain that is allowed access and launch permissions. In fact, the client need not be in any domain and can be anywhere on the network. This is demonstrated in Section C.3.1.3.

C.3.1 OpenVMS Instructions

The following sections describe how to build the application on an OpenVMS system.

Note

Not all functionality is present in the underlying WindowsNT infrastructure on OpenVMS. Therefore, you cannot run the client on OpenVMS. This example works when you run the client on Windows and the server on OpenVMS.

Copy files from the DCOM examples directory to your local directory:


   $ set default mydisk:[mydirectory]
   $ copy dcom$examples:[clientauth]*.* []

To build the application, run the command procedure:


   $ @build_clientauth

The BUILD file builds and registers both the in-process and out-of-process servers.

C.3.1.1 Registering the Application on OpenVMS

PROXY$SHR.EXE , CLIENTAUTH$SHR.EXE , and CLIENTAUTH.EXE are registered automatically by the build procedure. To register the application manually, use the following procedure:

  • To register the in-process server, use the REGSVR32 utility provided:


      $ regsvr32 :== $DCOM$REGSVR32.EXE
      $ regsvr32 <path-name>CLIENTAUTH$SHR.EXE
      $ regsvr32 <path-name>PROXY$SHR.EXE
    
  • To unregister the in-process server:


      $ regsvr32 /u <path-name>CLIENTAUTH$SHR.EXE
      $ regsvr32 /u <path-name>PROXY$SHR.EXE
    
  • To register the out-of-process server:


      $ clientauth :== $<path-name>CLIENTAUTH.EXE
      $ clientauth /regserver
    
  • To unregister the out-of-process server:


      $ clientauth /unregserver
    

C.3.1.2 Running the Application on OpenVMS as an Out-of-Process Server

To run the example when the component is an out-of-process server, run CLIENTAUTH.EXE . When you receive the server waiting message from the component, run the client (in a separate window or terminal session).

  • Window (or terminal session) 1:


       $ run clientauth
    
  • Window (or terminal session) 2:


       $ client :== $<path-name>CLIENT.EXE
       For OutProc:
       $ client
       2
       $
    

    The client asks whether you want to start an in-process server or an out-of-process server. Specify out-of-process server.

C.3.1.3 Running the Application on OpenVMS and Specifying a Remote Server

Run CLIENTAUTH.EXE on the system you designate as the remote machine, or server system. The remote system can also be a Windows system. When you receive the server waiting message from the component, run the client on the system you designate as the local machine, or client system.


   $ client :== $<path-name>CLIENT.EXE
   $ client <remote-system-name>
   2
   $ Please enter account to use on remote machine:
   $ Username:
   $ Domain:
   $ Password:

The client asks whether you want to start an in-process server or an out-of-process server. For remote server execution, specify out-of-process server. You then are prompted to enter the user name, domain, and password of an account on the remote server. Make sure this account has been granted access and launch permissions to the component (see Section 6.3.2).

C.3.1.4 Running the Application on OpenVMS as an In-Process Server

To run the sample when the component is an in-process server, run only the client:


   For InProc:
   $ client
   1
   $

The client asks whether you want to start an in-process server or an out-of-process server. Specify in-process server.

C.3.2 Windows Instructions

The following sections describe how to build the application on a Windows system.

Note

In order to build Visual C++ applications from a DOS window, you must first set up a number of environment variables. If you did not select the option to have these variables set up automatically when you installed Visual C++, you will need to set them up each time you create a DOS window. To set up these variables, execute the following file:


C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio\VC98\BIN\VCVARS32.BAT

C.3.2.1 Building the Application on Windows NT

Copy the file README-CLIENTAUTH.TXT and the following files from the DCOM examples directory to your Windows system:


   CLIENT.CXX
   CLIENTAUTH.CXX
   CLIENTAUTH.DEF
   CLIENTAUTH.IDL
   GUIDS.CXX
   MAKE-ONE.
   MAKEFILE.BAT
   PROXY.DEF
   REGISTRY.CXX
   REGISTRY.H

Build the sample using the MAKEFILE.BAT file:


   > MAKEFILE

The Makefile builds and registers both the in-process and out-of-process servers.

C.3.2.2 Registering the Application on Windows

CLIENTAUTH.DLL , PROXY.DLL , and CLIENTAUTH.EXE are registered automatically by the build procedure <make-one>:


   regsvr32 -s clientauth.dll
   regsvr32 -s Proxy.dll
   clientauth /RegServer

To unregister the application:


   regsvr32 -u clientauth.dll
   regsvr32 -u Proxy.dll
   clientauth /UnRegServer

C.3.2.3 Running the Application on Windows

Run CLIENT. Follow the same procedure as described for running the application on an in-process server and out-of-process server (see Section C.3.1.2 and Section C.3.1.4).

Do not use command line arguments to instantiate the object on the current machine. Instead, use the name of a remote machine (UNC or DNS) as an argument to instantiate the object on the remote machine.


  (i.e) >Client hostname        ! point the client at the remote system
        2                       ! means outproc invocation
        >
        >Username:
        >Domain:
        >Password:


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