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HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers Upgrade and Installation Manual

Legal Notice

Confidential computer software. Valid license from HP required for possession, use or copying. Consistent with FAR 12.211 and 12.212, Commercial Computer Software, Computer Software Documentation, and Technical Data for Commercial Items are licensed to the U.S. Government under vendor's standard commercial license.

The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.

Intel and Itanium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.

Java, the coffee cup logo, and all Java based marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems in the United States or other countries.

Kerberos is a trademark of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Microsoft, Windows, Microsoft NT, and Microsoft XP are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Vista is either a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group.

The HP OpenVMS documentation set is available on CD-ROM.

October 2007


Contents

Preface
About this document
Intended Audience
When to Use This Manual
New and Changed Information in this Edition
Document Organization
Typographical Conventions
Related Information
Publishing History
HP Encourages Your Comments
How to Order Additional Documentation
1 Getting Started
Key Terms
Getting to Know Your Integrity Server
Entering Commands at Integrity Server Console Interfaces
Integrity Server Tools
Virtual Connect (VC) on HP BladeSystem c-Class Enclosures
Cell-Based Server Terminology
Getting Started: Main Steps After You Unpack Your Integrity Server
Examining Software and Hardware Components
Hardware Components
Software Components
OpenVMS Alpha Operating System CD
OpenVMS for Integrity Servers Operating Environment DVD
Firmware on Alpha Systems
Firmware on Integrity Server Systems
Device-Naming Conventions
Using the Operating System Menu
Using the Install, Upgrade, or Reconfigure OpenVMS Option (1)
Using the Display Layered Products Option (2)
Using the Install or Upgrade Layered Products Option (3)
Using the Show Installed Products Option (4)
Using the Reconfigure Installed Products Option (5)
Using the Remove Installed Products Option (6)
Using the Patches and Recovery Data Option (7)
Using the Execute DCL Option (8)
Using the Shutdown Option (9)
Making the Install/Upgrade/Backup Selection
2 Preparing to Install in an OpenVMS Cluster Environment
Preinstallation Tasks for OpenVMS Cluster Environments
Review OpenVMS Cluster Information
Mixed-Version Support in OpenVMS Cluster Systems
OpenVMS Cluster Information You Need
Dismounting the Target System Disk Elsewhere in the Cluster
Beginning the Installation
3 Installing the OpenVMS Operating System
Installation Tasks
Booting the OpenVMS Operating System Media
Booting the OpenVMS Alpha CD
Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD
Installing the OpenVMS Operating System onto a System Disk
Differences Between OpenVMS I64 and Alpha Installations
Responding to Prompts During the Installation
Installing OpenVMS Using Option 1 of the Operating System Menu
Booting the New OpenVMS System Disk
Booting the OpenVMS Alpha System Disk
Booting the OpenVMS I64 System Disk
Next Steps
Joining an OpenVMS Cluster
Running AUTOGEN
Rebooting After AUTOGEN
Logging In to the SYSTEM Account
Logging In from a Character-Cell Terminal
Logging In from a Workstation
Postinstallation Tasks
4 Before Upgrading the OpenVMS Operating System
Preupgrade Tasks
Documentation to Review Before Upgrading Your System
Notes, Cautions, and Restrictions
Upgrade Paths
Update License Requirements
Components You Choose Not to Install
Licenses and Layered Products
Software That Must Be Manually Removed
Remove Older Versions of DECram for OpenVMS (Alpha Only)
Remove TDC Version 2.0 (Alpha Only)
Saving Archived Files from Being Deleted by the Upgrade
Preparing the System Disk
Checking the Directory Structure and Preserving Your Security Protections
Checking the SYSCOMMON Directories
Examining the System Disk
Checking the Size of the System Disk
Returning Authorization and AGEN$INCLUDE Files to the System Disk
Verifying System Parameters
Ensuring You Have a Recent FEEDBACK.DAT File
Shadowing Environment
Setting the Boot Device
Creating a Nonshadowed Target Disk
Backing Up the System Disk
Finishing Preupgrade Tasks
5 Preparing to Upgrade in an OpenVMS Cluster Environment
Preupgrade Tasks for OpenVMS Cluster Environments
Review OpenVMS Cluster Information
Mixed-Version Support in an OpenVMS Cluster Environment
Adding a New System to an OpenVMS Cluster
Types of Upgrades
Concurrent Upgrade
Rolling Upgrade
6 Upgrading the OpenVMS Operating System
Upgrade Tasks
Booting the OpenVMS Operating System Media
Booting the OpenVMS Alpha Operating System CD
Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD
Performing the Upgrade
Upgrading the System Using Option 1 of the Operating System Menu
Choosing INITIALIZE or PRESERVE
Specifying the Target Disk
Selecting Reinstallation and Reconfiguration Options
Checking for Recovery Data
Specifying the Volume Label
Specifying the On-Disk Structure Level
Choosing Whether to Allow the Procedure to Create and Validate Boot Options (I64 only)
Warning About Removal of the DECRAM Command
Setting OpenVMS Cluster Membership Information
Setting OpenVMS Galaxy Information (Alpha Only)
Updating Time Zone Information
Upgrading Windowing, Networking, and Related Products
Completing the Upgrade
Choosing Descriptive Help Text
Removing Older Versions of ENCRYPT
Secure Delivery Validation
Saving Archived Files
Selecting Product Component Options
Component and Product Installation Confirmation Messages
Upgrade Creates and Validates Boot Options (I64 Only)
Upgrade Completes and Returns to OpenVMS Operating System Menu
Shutting Down the System
What to Do After Shutdown
7 After Installing or Upgrading the OpenVMS Operating System
Postinstallation and Postupgrade Tasks
Backing Up Your System Disk
Registering Your Licenses
Set System Parameters for Volume Shadowing (New Installations Only; Optional)
Tuning BAP System Parameters (Alpha Upgrade Only)
Running AUTOGEN to Set System Parameter Changes
Forming the Shadow Set
Customizing the System (New Installations, Some Upgrades)
Creating Network Proxy Authorization Files
Setting Up the Queue Manager and Default Queues
Configuring a Multihead System (Optional)
Configuring DECnet
Configuring HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS
Installing and Configuring Third-Party Networking Software
Initializing or Configuring Other Installed Components
Initializing CDSA (Optional)
Configuring the Availability Manager Base Software (Optional)
Configuring Kerberos (Optional)
Configuring SSL for OpenVMS (Optional)
Configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS (Optional; I64 only)
Configure WBEM Providers for OpenVMS (Optional; I64 only)
Configure the Instant Capacity Software (Optional; I64 only)
Configure the Pay per use Software (Optional; I64 only)
Configure HP SIM (Optional; I64 only)
Initializing and Running the Performance Data Collector Base Software (Optional)
Preparing to Use OpenVMS Management Station (Optional)
Installing OpenVMS Debugger Clients on a PC (Optional)
Creating a System-Specific Login Welcome Message (Optional)
Examining Your Command Procedures (Upgrades Only)
Adding and Removing Operating System Files (Optional)
Expanding the System Libraries (Optional; OpenVMS Alpha Only)Compressing the System Libraries (Optional, OpenVMS I64: Not Recommended)
Installing Patches (Optional but Recommended)
Installing and Configuring Layered Products (New Installations, Some Upgrades)
Alternative Procedure
Reinstall DECevent Software (Alpha Upgrades only; optional)
Creating Print Queues (New Installations, Some Upgrades)
Updating SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM to Start Layered Products and Print Queues
Creating Accounts (New Installations, Some Upgrades)
Testing the System with UETP (Optional)
Backing Up the Customized System Disk and Initiating Systematic Backups
Reforming the Shadow Set as Final Postupgrade Backup
Rebooting Cluster Members (Upgrades Only)
Running AUTOGEN to Tune the System
Modifying System Parameters
General Notes About Modifying System Parameters
Modifying System Parameters After an Upgrade
A Booting and Shutting Down Your OpenVMS Alpha System
Booting Operations
Booting the OpenVMS Alpha Operating System CD
Booting with a PMAZB or PMAZC TURBOchannel Adapter
Booting Manually from the System Disk
Performing a Conversational (Interactive) Boot
Booting with Minimum Startup
Booting with the XDelta Utility (XDELTA)
Booting from a Different Root Directory
Booting over the Network with an Alternate TURBOchannel Adapter
Booting in an Emergency
Configuring Boot Behavior for Alpha Systems
Setting the System for Automatic Booting
Setting and Showing Boot Devices
Setting Boot Flag Parameters
Writing a New Boot Block
Halt and Shutdown Operations
Halting the System
Shutting Down the System
Troubleshooting Procedures
If the System Does Not Boot
Detecting and Responding to System Problems
B Configuring OpenVMS I64 Hardware Operation and Boot Operations, and Booting and Shutting Down Your System
Configuration and Management Utilities for HP Integrity Servers
Overview of Utilities and Console Options
Configuration and Management Utilities on Cell-Based Servers
Using the Delete or Backspace Key with Integrity Server Utilities
Selecting Your OpenVMS Console for the Integrity Server System
Selecting Your OpenVMS Console (Not Applicable to rx2600 Integrity Servers)
Selecting Your OpenVMS Console on rx2600 Integrity Servers
Overview of Using EFI
General Notes About Using EFI
Enabling or Disabling Hyper-Threading on Dual-Core Processors
Configuring and Managing OpenVMS Booting on Integrity Servers
Checking the ACPI Configuration for Booting OpenVMS in an nPartition
Setting Boot Options for Your System Disk
Writing a New Boot Block
Alpha and Equivalent Integrity Server System Boot Commands
Booting Operations
Overview of Booting on a Cell-Based Server
Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD from the Local Drive
Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD from the InfoServer
Booting an Image of the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD Using HP SIM Provisioning
Booting an Image of the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD Using vMedia
Booting from a Fibre Channel Device
Booting Manually from the Local System Disk
Performing a Conversational (Interactive) Boot
Booting with Minimum Startup
Booting with the XDelta Utility (XDELTA)
Booting from a Different Root Directory
Emergency Booting
Halt and Shutdown Procedures
Halting the Integrity Server to Recover from Hangs and Crashes
Shutting Down the System
Troubleshooting Procedures
If the System Does Not Boot
Detecting and Responding to System Problems
C Setting Up and Performing Network Booting
About the OpenVMS InfoServer Utility
Setting Up Your System as an InfoServer Client
Determining the Local Network I/O Card to Be Used
Adding the Network Boot Option to the EFI Boot Manager
Verifying the Network I/O Device Is Bootable by EFI
Setting Up the InfoServer Server
Setting Up the BOOTP Boot Server and TFTP Server (OpenVMS I64 only)
Booting OpenVMS I64 from the InfoServer
Troubleshooting InfoServer Boot Problems
D Using HP SIM and vMedia to Install and Upgrade OpenVMS
HP SIM Provisioning of OpenVMS
About HP SIM and Provisioning
Prerequisites for HP SIM Provisioning
Setting Up InfoServer Support
Setting Up vMedia
Setting Up HP SIM and the Windows Server to Provision OpenVMS
Provisioning OpenVMS
Using vMedia Independently of HP SIM
Prerequisites for Using vMedia to Install or Upgrade OpenVMS
Using vMedia to Install or Upgrade OpenVMS
E Setting Up and Booting Fibre Channel Storage Devices
Booting on a Fibre Channel Storage Device on OpenVMS Alpha Systems
Using the AlphaServer Console for Configuring Fibre Channel (Alpha Only)
Booting on a Fibre Channel Storage Device on OpenVMS I64 Systems
Checking the Firmware Version
Obtaining the IPF Offline Diagnostics and Utilities
Configuring and Booting FC Boot Device
Configuring Additional Nodes to Boot into a Cluster Using a Shared Disk
F Backing Up and Restoring the System Disk
Reasons for Backing Up the System Disk
Suggested Procedures
OpenVMS Cluster Caution
Backing Up the System Disk
Getting Started
Mounting Devices
Performing the System Disk Backup
Changing the Disk Volume Cluster Size
Logging Out, Shutting Down, and Rebooting
Restoring the System Disk
Getting Started
Mounting Devices
Performing the System Disk Restore
Logging Out, Shutting Down, and Rebooting
Alternative Backup and Restore Procedure (Minimum OpenVMS Environment)
Preparing an Alternate System Disk
Using the Alternate System Disk
G Installing the OpenVMS Internationalization Data Kit
H Preparing to Use OpenVMS Management Station
Preparing Your OpenVMS System
Setting Up in a Mixed-Architecture Cluster Environment
Starting the Server on Other Nodes
Error Log Information
Updating the Printer and Storage Database
Editing the System Files
Controlling the Printer and Storage Environment
Keeping Your Printer Environment Up to Date
Keeping Your Storage Environment Up to Date
Enabling Disk Quotas
Caching Storage Configuration Data
Running Third-Party TCP/IP Stacks
Determining and Reporting Problems
Removing the OpenVMS Management Station Server
Preparing Your PC
Required Memory and Disk Space
Distribution Files
Required Software
Time Required for Installation
Copying the Client File to the PC
Installation Directory
Installation Procedure
Recovering from Errors
After Installing the Client Software on Your PC
Defining TCP/IP Nodes
Removing Version 2.1 of the OpenVMS Management Station Client
Removing OpenVMS Management Station
Getting Started with OpenVMS Management Station
I Removing the OpenVMS Operating System
J Alternative Ways to Initialize the System Disk
Alternative Method of Initialization
Removing the Diagnostic Partition File (I64 Only)
Glossary
Index

Figures

E.1 Fibre Channel Host and SAN Storage Controller Configuration

Tables

1.1 Definitions of Terms
1.2 Getting OpenVMS Started on Integrity Servers
2.1 Preinstallation Checklist
2.2 Warranted Cluster Support
2.3 Supported Migration Pairs
3.1 Installation Checklist
3.2 Prompts for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations
4.1 Preupgrade Checklist
4.2 Logical Names for Relocated Authorization Files
5.1 Preupgrade Checklist for OpenVMS Cluster Environments
5.2 Warranted Cluster Support
5.3 Supported Migration Pairing
6.1 Upgrade Checklist
7.1 Postinstallation and Postupgrade Checklist
7.2 Reduced and Expanded Sizes of Libraries
A.1 Supported LAN Devices
A.2 SYSGEN Commands Used in the SYSBOOT Procedure
A.3 Emergency Boot Procedures
B.1 Alpha and Integrity Server EFI Command Equivalents
B.2 SYSGEN Commands Used in the SYSBOOT Procedure
B.3 Emergency Boot Procedures
C.1 InfoServer Booting: Differences Between Alpha and I64 Systems
C.2 Procedure for Enabling InfoServer Network Booting

Examples

3.1 Component Options and Suboptions
C.1 Setting Up the Boot Server and Client
E.1 Using wwidmgr -show wwid
E.2 Using wwidmgr -show wwid -full
E.3 Using widmgr -quickset
E.4 Boot Sequence from an FC System Disk

Preface

About this document

This document explains how to install, or upgrade to, Version 8.3-1H1 of the HP OpenVMS OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS for Integrity servers (OpenVMS I64) operating system. Also included are the prerequisites for installing and upgrading your software and the required and optional tasks you can perform after you complete the software installation or upgrade.

Note:

This document is a work in progress. Not all the information in this manual has been updated for the current release; more information will be added. Throughout the remainder of this document, the version number of OpenVMS is referred to as 8.3–1H1 instead of E8.3–1H1.

Intended Audience

This manual is intended for anyone responsible for installing or upgrading the OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS I64 operating system, and for the startup, shutdown, and backup operations required on Alpha or Integrity servers running this software.

When to Use This Manual

Use this manual if you need to install or upgrade the OpenVMS operating system software yourself or if you need to perform certain startup, shutdown, or backup operations. If you received factory-installed software (FIS) with your Alpha system or Integrity server, see the release notes provided with the software, and use this manual for any information not covered in those release notes.

New and Changed Information in this Edition

The following information is new or revised for OpenVMS Version 8.3–1H1:

  • Support for the latest HP Integrity servers supporting Intel Itanium Dual-Core processors, including the HP Integrity BL860c Server Blade

    Some of these servers do not include a built-in CD/DVD drive. You can use an external USB CD/DVD drive (you must supply this drive and the required cable; they are not included with the Integrity servers). However, OpenVMS Version 8.3–1H1 supports provisioning and virtual media (vMedia) devices to allow you to boot, install, or upgrade OpenVMS over the network. For an up-to-date list of servers supported by this release of OpenVMS, see the HP OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and HP OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 Software Product Description (SPD 82.35.xx).

  • Management support, including provisioning, providers, and WBEM infrastructure

    OpenVMS on HP Integrity rx3600 and rx6600 servers and on HP Integrity BL860c Server Blades can be managed from HP Systems Insight Manager (HP SIM) Version 5.2 or later. HP SIM (an HP implementation of WBEM) provides simplified, centralized management of multiple servers and platforms through a web-based, unified interface. HP SIM is supported on OpenVMS from Microsoft Windows ProLiant servers. The Windows server requires an OpenVMS plug-in for HP SIM (the plug-in is available from the web; for more information, see Section ). To be managed by HP SIM, your Integrity server requires HP WBEM (Web-Based Enterprise Management) Services for OpenVMS and the HP WBEM Providers for OpenVMS. These WBEM products are installed automatically with OpenVMS but you must configure them manually. (Configuration instructions for these products are provided in Section  and Section , respectively.) The WBEM products enable HP SIM to retrieve information about the OpenVMS operating system on your Integrity server and to manage the operating system. For network functionality, the WBEM products also require HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS and HP SSL.

    With provisioning support, you can use HP SIM to install or upgrade OpenVMS quickly and easily on one or more servers in the network, much in the same way as HP-UX supports provisioning. Such support facilitates installing or upgrading OpenVMS on Integrity servers that do not include a CD/DVD drive.

    Provisioning is supported with HP SIM Version 5.1 or later. You use HP SIM to initiate the provisioning, after which the installation or upgrade process occurs automatically in the background. To provide provisioning over the network, you can use HP SIM in two ways:

    • In conjunction with the InfoServer software utility (and TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS), you create a service for a bootable image of OpenVMS (a container file) stored at a location on the network accessible to the InfoServer. In this use of HP SIM, you can provision multiple servers (up to 8) simultaneously.

    • In conjunction with vMedia, you create an ISO image of the OpenVMS Operating Environment (OE) DVD, store the image on the server where HP SIM is running, and use HP SIM to connect vMedia to that image. Using vMedia, you can provision one server at a time. Currently, provisioning does not support booting from a shadowed system disk.

    For more information about HP SIM, see the Information Library on the following website:

    http://www.hp.com/go/hpsim

    For information about configuring WBEM Services for OpenVMS and WBEM Providers for OpenVMS, see Section  and Section . For information about setting up and performing provisioning, see Appendix D.

  • Support for virtual media (vMedia)

    The vMedia device is the first in a series of virtual-disk capabilities included in the current generation of management-processor (MP, Integrity iLO 2) hardware. vMedia consists of two primary components: firmware in MP hardware that emulates a USB DVD and Java™ code that runs on a remote PC and performs I/O to the PC’s local CD/DVD drive. vMedia can provide you with a virtual CD/DVD drive that connects over the network to your Integrity server, just as if they are physically connected. You can use vMedia for initial system installation on a system without a built-in DVD, or remote installation on a system physically located elsewhere. It also allows you to install layered products, either remotely or on systems without a built-in DVD. For information about setting up and performing vMedia provisioning, see Appendix D.

  • Support for Virtual Connect (VC) on HP BladeSystem c-Class enclosures

    HP Virtual Connect (VC) is a set of interconnect modules and embedded software available for HP BladeSystem c-Class enclosures. VC simplifies the setup and administration of server connections. Where most server interconnect choices come with compromises such as too many cables or too much to manage, VC reduces the number of network cables and simplifies management while adding the unique ability to wire everything once, then add, replace or recover servers in minutes instead of hours or days. VC is enabled with a choice of Ethernet and Fibre Channel modules designed for the HP BladeSystem. The built-in HP Virtual Connect manager defines a server connection profile for each server bay—even before a server is installed. This profile establishes the Media Access Control (MAC) addresses for all Network Interface Controllers (NICs), the World Wide Names (WWNs) for all Host Bus Adapters (HBAs), and the SAN boot parameters. The profile holds them constant so that even if the server is changed, the configuration and connection profile stay constant. When a new server takes its place, the same profile is assigned.

    For more information about VC, select the Virtual Connect networking link at the following website:

    http://www.hp.com/go/bladesystem/virtualconnect

    In addition, see the HP Virtual Connect for c-Class BladeSystem User's Guide, available at the following location:

    http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c00865618/c00865618.pdf

  • Support for a VGA console and USB keyboard as console devices for booting

    With VGA support, you can now connect a monitor, keyboard, and mouse directly to connectors provided for that purpose on your Integrity server panel. You no longer need to use a serial console, including PC/terminal emulator or character-cell terminal as a console. On systems that do not include an embedded graphics device, you might be able to select a graphics option card in a PCI slot to be the graphics console. Check your Integrity server hardware documentation for details. OpenVMS also supports multiple VGA devices on the same Integrity server. XDELTA boot and conversational (interactive) boot are not supported over a VGA console. VGA console support for OpenVMS is available for most Integrity servers. For more information, see Section .

  • Support of new time zones

    Eight new time zones have been added to this release:

    • America/Atikokan

    • America/Blanc-Sablon

    • America/North_Dakota/New_Salem

    • Europe/Guernsey

    • Europe/Isle_of_Man

    • Europe/Jersey

    • Europe/Podgorica

    • Europe/Volgograd

    For information about setting the local time zone for your computer, seeSection . The new time zones are not shown in the examples provided in this manual.

  • Add mention of firmware update info change to accommodate new PCI-e adapters for FCs.

Document Organization

This manual is organized as follows:

  • Chapter 1 defines key terms and provides information about hardware and software components. Review this chapter before performing any installation or upgrade.

  • Chapter 2 provides preliminary information.

  • Chapter 3 explains how to install the OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS I64 operating system.

  • Chapter 4 describes how to prepare your system for an upgrade.

  • Chapter 5 supplements Chapter 4 with additional tasks you must perform before upgrading an OpenVMS Cluster system.

  • Chapter 6 describes how to upgrade the operating system.

  • Chapter 7 describes the tasks you must perform after installing or upgrading the operating system.

  • Appendix A contains instructions on booting, halting, and shutting down OpenVMS Alpha systems. It also includes instructions on configuring boot options.

  • Appendix B provides an overview of the utilities available with HP Integrity servers, and explains how to configure the system console, how to configure boot options, and how to boot the OpenVMS operating system.

  • Appendix C explains how to set up and perform network booting for installations and upgrades using the InfoServer utility, a software application available on certain OpenVMS Alpha and OpenVMS I64 systems.

  • Appendix D explains how to set up and perform provisioning (installations and upgrades) of OpenVMS on one or more Integrity servers in a network using HP SIM. In addition, this appendix explains how to use vMedia to install or upgrade OpenVMS on an Integrity server in the network.

  • Appendix E explains how to boot the Fibre Channel storage device.

  • Appendix F explains how to back up and restore the system disk.

  • Appendix G discusses the OpenVMS internationalization data kit (VMSI18N) and how to install it.

  • Appendix H explains how to prepare your OpenVMS system and your PC to run the OpenVMS Management Station server and client software.

  • Appendix I explains how to remove the OpenVMS operating system from your disk.

  • Appendix J explains alternate methods of initializing an OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS I64 system disk and includes information about diagnostic partitions on OpenVMS I64 system disks.

  • The Glossary  defines key terms used in this manual.

Typographical Conventions

The following conventions are used in this manual:

ConventionMeaning
Ctrl/XA sequence such as Ctrl/x indicates that you must hold down the key labeled Ctrl while you press another key or a pointing device button.
PF1XA sequence such as PF1X indicates that you must first press and release the key labeled PF1 and then press and release another key (x) or a pointing device button.
EnterIn examples, a key name in bold indicates that you press that key.
A horizontal ellipsis in examples indicates one of the following possibilities:− Additional optional arguments in a statement have been omitted.− The preceding item or items can be repeated one or more times.− Additional parameters, values, or other information can be entered.
.
.
.
A vertical ellipsis indicates the omission of items from a code example or command format; the items are omitted because they are not important to the topic being discussed.
( )In command format descriptions, parentheses indicate that you must enclose choices in parentheses if you specify more than one. In installation or upgrade examples, parentheses indicate the possible answers to a prompt, such as: Is this correct? (Y/N) [Y]
[ ]In command format descriptions, brackets indicate optional choices. You can choose one or more items or no items. Do not type the brackets on the command line. However, you must include the brackets in the syntax for OpenVMS directory specifications and for a substring specification in an assignment statement. In installation or upgrade examples, brackets indicate the default answer to a prompt if you press Enter without entering a value, as in: Is this correct? (Y/N) [Y]
|In command format descriptions, vertical bars separate choices within brackets or braces. Within brackets, the choices are optional; within braces, at least one choice is required. Do not type the vertical bars on the command line.
{ }In command format descriptions, braces indicate required choices; you must choose at least one of the items listed. Do not type the braces on the command line.
bold typeBold type represents the name of an argument, an attribute, or a reason. In command and script examples, bold indicates user input. Bold type also represents the introduction of a new term.
italic typeItalic type indicates important information, complete titles of manuals, or variables. Variables include information that varies in system output (Internal error number), in command lines (/PRODUCER=name), and in command parameters in text (where dd represents the predefined code for the device type).
UPPERCASE TYPEUppercase type indicates a command, the name of a routine, the name of a file, or the abbreviation for a system privilege.
Example

This typeface indicates code examples, command examples, and interactive screen displays. In text, this type also identifies website addresses, UNIX command and pathnames, PC-based commands and folders, and certain elements of the C programming language.

A hyphen at the end of a command format description, command line, or code line indicates that the command or statement continues on the following line.
numbers All numbers in text are assumed to be decimal unless otherwise noted. Nondecimal radixes—binary, octal, or hexadecimal—are explicitly indicated.

Related Information

Before installing, upgrading, or using the OpenVMS operating system on your computer, be sure you have access to the following documents. Some of the documents listed here are from an earlier OpenVMS version documentation set. They have not been revised, they remain valid for OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1.

  • Cover Letter for HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers and any other cover letters included with your kit.

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes, which describes enhancements and new features included in this release of the OpenVMS I64 operating system and provides important supplementary information about the OpenVMS I64 operating system.

  • HP OpenVMS License Management Utility Manual, which explains how to use the License Management Facility (LMF), the license management tool for the OpenVMS operating system. The manual describes licensing requirements and the tasks required to manage licenses.

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes, which provides important supplementary information about the OpenVMS I64 system that might still be valid for the OpenVMS 8.3-1H1 release.

  • HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems and Guidelines for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations, if you plan to install your system in an OpenVMS Cluster environment.

  • The most recent version of the DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS Installation Guide and Managing DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS Systems (if you plan to install and customize DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS software).

  • HP Open Source Security for OpenVMS, Volume 1: Common Data Security Architecture, which provides information about CDSA software.

  • HP Open Source Security for OpenVMS, Volume 2: HP SSL for OpenVMS, which provides information about HP SSL software.

  • HP Open Source Security for OpenVMS, Volume 3: Kerberos, which provides information about Kerberos software.

  • HP Availability Manager Installation Instructions, which provides information about Availability Manager software and is available at the following website:

    http://www.hp.com/products/openvms/availabilitymanager

  • For documentation related to the Performance Data Collector (TDC), see the following website:

    http://www.hp.com/products/openvms/tdc/

  • The following networking software documents (if you plan to install and configure DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS, DECnet Phase IV for OpenVMS, or TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS software):

    • HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS Installation and Configuration

    • DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS Installation and Configuration

    Documentation for these networking products is included on the OpenVMS Version 8.3 Online Documentation CD. Hardcopy documentation must be purchased separately.

  • For documentation related to Instant Capacity (iCAP), Temporary Instant Capacity (TiCAP), Global Instant Capacity (GiCAP), and Pay per use (PPU), see the HP Instant Capacity User’s Guide and HP Pay per use User’s Guide on the following website:

    http://docs.hp.com/en/hplex.html#Utility%20Pricing

  • HP SIM documentation is available in the Information Library on the following website:

    http://www.hp.com/go/hpsim

  • HP gWLM documentation is available in the Information Library on the following website (select the Information Library link and then the Manuals, Release Notes, Manpages link and see the Version A.01.01 manuals):

    http://www.hp.com/go/gwlm

    Information about gWLM and documentation for installing the gWLM agent on OpenVMS I64 systems, including release notes, is available at the following website:

    http://h71000.www7.hp.com/openvms/integrity/integrity_gwm.html

  • The hardware manuals that are supplied with your Alpha or Integrity server computer. These manuals provide detailed information about your system hardware, including the operation of the system unit, the drives, and the monitor.

During the course of installing, upgrading, or using the OpenVMS operating system on your computer, you could refer to the following documents as well:

  • HP OpenVMS License Management Utility Manual, which contains detailed information about registering your software licenses.

  • HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual and the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual, which contain information about system management operations and utilities that you might need to use when you install, upgrade, customize, and maintain your OpenVMS system. The HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: M-Z provides complete information about using the PCSI utility PRODUCT command to add or remove files, install other software, and related operations.

  • HP Volume Shadowing for OpenVMS, which you might need if you are installing or upgrading the OpenVMS operating system on a shadowed system disk.

  • HP OpenVMS Management Station Installation Guide, which provides information about getting started, setting up, and using OpenVMS Management Station.

For additional information about HP OpenVMS products and services, see the following website:

http://www.hp.com/go/openvms

For information about managing nPartitions on midrange or Superdome servers, see the nPartition Administrator's Guide (previously titled HP System Partitions Guide: Administration for nPartitions).

For the latest hardware documentation for HP Integrity servers, see the following website:

http://docs.hp.com/en/hw.html

For the latest hardware documentation for Alpha computers, see the following website:

http://www.hp.com/go/alphadocs

Publishing History

The document printing date and part number indicate the document’s current edition. The printing date will change when a new edition is printed. Minor changes may be made at reprint without changing the printing date. The document part number will change when extensive changes are made. Document updates may be issued between editions to correct errors or document product changes. To ensure that you receive the updated or new editions, you should subscribe to the appropriate product support service. See your HP sales representative for details. You can find the latest version of this document on line at:

http://www.docs.hp.com.

Manufacturing Part NumberSupported Operating SystemsSupported VersionsEdition NumberPublication Date
BA322–90077OpenVMS I64Version 8.3-1H11.0October, 2007

HP Encourages Your Comments

HP welcomes your comments on this manual.

Please send comments to either of the following addresses:

Internet: openvmsdoc@hp.com
Postal Mail:
Hewlett-Packard Company
OpenVMS Documentation Group
ZKO3-4/Y02
110 Spit Brook Road
Nashua, NH 03062-2698

How to Order Additional Documentation

Visit the following World Wide Web address for information about how to order additional documentation:

http://www.hp.com/go/openvms/doc/order

Chapter 1 Getting Started

This chapter defines key terms and describes preliminary procedures you must perform before installing or upgrading your OpenVMS system.

Note:

Throughout this book, examples are taken from OpenVMS I64 installations or upgrades except where stated otherwise. OpenVMS DCL commands are in uppercase, while HP Integrity servers console commands are in lowercase.

Key Terms

Table 1.1 lists a few key terms you need to know before you install or upgrade the system.

Definitions of Terms

TermDefinition

HSx device

A self-contained, intelligent, mass storage subsystem that lets computers in an OpenVMS Cluster system environment share disks. The disk on which you install or upgrade the operating system can be connected to one of these systems (for example, an HSV or HSG).

InfoServer

A general-purpose disk storage server. For OpenVMS Alpha systems, the InfoServer may be an independent hardware device or, beginning with OpenVMS Version 8.3, it may be a utility (software application) on an OpenVMS system. On OpenVMS I64 systems, the InfoServer is only available as a software application on an OpenVMS system.

The InfoServer hardware can serve CDs only (it does not support DVDs); thus, this hardware device cannot serve the OpenVMS I64 operating environment (OE) DVD. The InfoServer utility can serve both DVDs and CDs (for OpenVMS I64 and OpenVMS Alpha systems, respectively). The systems connected to the same LAN can use the InfoServer utility to boot the OpenVMS operating system from a virtual drive (instead of the local drive). For more information about the InfoServer utility, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 New Features and Documentation Overview.

local drive

A drive on your computer system, such as a CD, DVD, or disk drive (hard drive), that is connected directly to the computer. If you have a standalone computer, it is likely that all drives connected to the computer system are local drives.

operating system media

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD or the OpenVMS for Integrity servers Operating Environment DVD (OE DVD) included with an OpenVMS distribution kit, which contains the OpenVMS operating system and the installation and other procedures described in this manual.

provisioning

Using HP Systems Insight Manager (HP SIM), the process of installing or upgrading OpenVMS on one or more Integrity servers automatically. HP SIM initiates the process and the installation or upgrade automatically continues in the background.

source drive

The drive that holds the operating system media during an upgrade or installation. This can be a local drive or an InfoServer virtual drive. The drive contains the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD or the OpenVMS for Integrity servers Operating Environment DVD, or a copy of it.

system disk

The disk from which OpenVMS is typically booted. During an installation or upgrade, this is the target disk because it receives files from the source drive. After installation or upgrade, the target drive is booted and becomes the system disk.

target drive

The drive that holds the target system disk during the upgrade or installation. Note: the target drive must be a hard drive, not a CD or DVD.

virtual media (vMedia)

A virtual-disk capability included with Integrated Lights Out (iLO) 2 Management Processor (MP) on Integrity servers. vMedia provides virtual devices that mimic physical hardware devices. For example, it can provide a virtual CD/DVD drive that emulates the DVD drive on a PC and connects over the network to your Integrity server as if it were physically connected. You can use vMedia to install OpenVMS on Integrity servers that do not include a built-in DVD drive or that are physically located elsewhere. vMedia can provide the network service for HP SIM provisioning, or it can be used independently of HP SIM.

Getting to Know Your Integrity Server

The OpenVMS operating system is now supported on a wide variety of HP Integrity servers, including the following:

  • Entry-class servers, which include members of the rx16nn, rx26nn, rx36nn, rx46nn, and rx66nn series and the BladeSystems Integrity BL860c Server Blade

  • Midrange servers, which include members of the rx76nn and rx86nn series

  • High-end servers (Superdome)

For an up-to-date list of servers supported by the current release of OpenVMS, see the HP OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and HP OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 Software Product Description (SPD 82.35.xx).

The hardware, firmware, and software supported might vary significantly from system to system. Integrity servers are available in many different configurations. The hardware, utilities, and hardware configuration procedures might differ significantly across models, and even across versions of the same model. This manual provides basic information about the firmware, hardware, and utilities offered on Integrity servers. This information is not meant to replace the hardware documentation. For the most up-to-date and relevant information for your particular model, see the hardware documentation for your Integrity server. The hardware documentation includes model-specific illustrations to guide you. The latest version of documentation for your server can be found online at:

http://docs.hp.com/en/hw.html

http://www.hp.com/support/itaniumservers

For the latest information about firmware, software requirements, and special considerations for your Integrity server, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes.

Entering Commands at Integrity Server Console Interfaces

When entering commands for the Integrity server, if you press Delete on a VTxxx terminal (or press the key you have mapped to send the DEL/RUBOUT character code in your terminal emulator), the last character typed might not be deleted, as would be expected on an OpenVMS Alpha system. The firmware on Integrity servers where that unexpected behavior occurs uses Ctrl/H to delete the last character typed. On such Integrity servers, you can remap your terminal to use Ctrl/H instead of DEL/RUBOUT, as described in Section .

Integrity Server Tools

Integrity servers include multiple interfaces for working with various aspects of the server or server complex. The Management Processor (MP) is available on most Integrity servers. Many entry-class Integrity servers now come with the Integrated Lights Out (iLO) MP (Integrity iLO 2 MP), which provides a complete remote console experience, including a web-based graphical user interface and the functionality provided by vMedia. MP and Integrity iLO provide a service interface that allows access to all hardware and, in a complex, all nPartitions. The MP is always available, even when the main power source is turned off (MP can operate on standby power). On cell-based servers (such as rx7620, rx8620, and Superdome), MP is available whether or not nPartitions are configured or booted in the server complex. You can navigate from MP to and from the operating system (if it is booted).

The Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) provides support for operating system loaders and allows you to configure the firmware and control the booting environment. EFI is accessible only when the operating system is not booted. On cell-based servers, each nPartition has a separate EFI console interface. EFI provides support for managing nPartitions. The EFI interface is available from an nPartition console only when the nPartition is in an active state but has not booted an operating system.

You can move from the EFI interface to MP and back again. Similarly, you can move from MP to the operating system and back.

Virtual Connect (VC) on HP BladeSystem c-Class Enclosures

HP Virtual Connect (VC) is a set of interconnect modules and embedded software available for HP BladeSystem c-Class enclosures. VC simplifies the setup and administration of server connections. Where most server interconnect choices come with compromises such as too many cables or too much to manage, VC reduces the number of network cables and simplifies management while adding the unique ability to wire everything once, then add, replace or recover servers in minutes instead of hours or days.

VC is enabled with a choice of Ethernet and Fibre Channel modules designed for the HP BladeSystem. The built-in HP Virtual Connect manager defines a server connection profile for each server bay—even before a server is installed. This profile establishes the Media Access Control (MAC) addresses for all Network Interface Controllers (NICs), the World Wide Names (WWNs) for all Host Bus Adapters (HBAs), and the SAN boot parameters. The profile then holds them constant so that even if the server is changed, the configuration and connection profile stay constant. When a new server takes its place, the same profile is assigned.

For more information about VC, select the Virtual Connect networking link at the following website:

http://www.hp.com/go/bladesystem/virtualconnect

In addition, see the HP Virtual Connect for c-Class BladeSystem User's Guide, available at the following location:

http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c00865618/c00865618.pdf

Cell-Based Server Terminology

A cell-based server—such as the HP rx7620, rx8720, or Superdome server—is a hardware complex that can run one or more operating systems and that supports dividing hardware resources into nPartitions. Thus, it enables you to configure a complex into one large system or into several smaller systems.

All processors and memory are contained in cells, each of which can be assigned for exclusive use by an nPartition. An nPartition defines a subset of the server hardware resources that is used as an independent system environment. An nPartition has its own EFI system boot interface and each nPartition boots and reboots independently. Each nPartition provides both hardware and software isolation so that hardware or software faults in one nPartition do not affect other nPartitions within the same server complex.

By using HP software-based nPartition management tools, you can configure nPartition definitions for a server without physically modifying the server hardware configuration. The main administration tools for nPartitions are the Partition Manager, which provides a graphical interface, and the nPartition Commands, which provides a command-line interface. Versions of these interfaces are provided on HP-UX, Linux, and Microsoft Windows systems. The nPartition Commands tool is also available on Linux systems. MP and EFI can also perform nPartition administrative tasks. Slightly different tool sets and capabilities are available on different server models. For more information, see your hardware documentation. In addition, see the nPartition Administrator's Guide (previously titled HP System Partitions Guide: Administration for nPartitions).

Getting Started: Main Steps After You Unpack Your Integrity Server

When you unpack your Integrity server, the main steps for getting OpenVMS up and running are those listed in Table 1.2. As indicated in the third column, some of the instructions are provided in this manual. However, for the most up-to-date information specific to your Integrity server model and version, always refer to the hardware documentation provided for your Integrity server.

Getting OpenVMS Started on Integrity Servers

Step

ActionDocumentation

1

Connect your console cable to the serial port; if MP is present on your server, connect to the MP serial port.Section 

2

Optionally, configure MP to accept connections over TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS.Hardware manual

3

From the EFI Shell interface or EFI Boot Manager menu, select the device for the OpenVMS console.Section ; if you ordered your server preinstalled, console selections are already made but you might need to change them

4

Power on your Integrity server, insert the OpenVMS I64 distribution media (DVD) into the drive, cycle power, and then use the EFI boot menu to boot from the DVD.For how to power on and recycle power, see the hardware documentation; for instructions on booting the DVD, see Section 

After the initial boot, you need not use EFI to configure boot options. You can configure EFI boot options while OpenVMS is running by using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM), as explained in Section . This utility is easier to use than EFI and allows you to configure the most pertinent options for your system. In addition, the OpenVMS installation (and upgrade) procedure can assist you in establishing and validating boot options for your system disk.

Examining Software and Hardware Components

Before you begin an installation or upgrade, be sure you have all the required hardware and software components, as described in the following sections.

Hardware Components

For hardware components, verify the following::

  • Be sure the hardware is installed and verified for proper operation. For detailed information, see the hardware manuals you received with your computer.

    For initial installations on Integrity servers, your console terminal requires a standard PC-to-PC file transfer cable (also known as a null modem cable; 9-pin female connectors at each end) to connect a PC, laptop, or similar device that includes terminal emulation software; alternatively, you can use a VGA monitor and USB keyboard (and USB mouse). For information about setting up your system console, see Section .

  • Be sure you know how to turn on and operate the components of your system, including the system unit, console, monitor, drives, terminals, and printers. If necessary, read the hardware manuals that came with these components.

  • Make sure you record the installation procedure. You need a transcript if a problem occurs during installation. If you are using terminal emulation software, set the software to log the session. Otherwise, set up your system to record the installation procedure on either a hardcopy terminal or a printer attached to the console terminal. (See your hardware manuals for more details about connecting those components to your system.)

Software Components

For software components, verify the following:

  • Be sure you have all the items listed on the bill of materials contained in the distribution kit. If your distribution kit is incomplete, notify HP Customer Support and request priority shipment of any missing items.

  • Before installing the OpenVMS operating system software, review all cover letters and release notes.

OpenVMS Alpha Operating System CD

Included in your OpenVMS Alpha kit is the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD, which you use to install or upgrade the operating system, or to perform operations such as backing up the system disk. The CD is labeled similar to the following:

CD label

HP OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 Operating System

Volume label

ALPHA083

The CD label is the printed label on the CD. The volume label is the machine-readable name that the OpenVMS Alpha operating system and InfoServer systems (or utilities) use to access the CD.

OpenVMS for Integrity Servers Operating Environment DVD

Included in your OpenVMS I64 kit is the OpenVMS for Integrity Servers OE DVD, which you use to install the operating system or to perform operations such as backing up the system disk. The DVD is labeled similar to the following:

DVD label

HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers Operating Environment

Volume label

I640831H1

The DVD label is the printed label on the OE DVD. The volume label is the machine-readable name that the OpenVMS I64 operating system uses to access and identify the DVD.

Firmware on Alpha Systems

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 performs a firmware check each time the system is booted. When you boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD, the system automatically checks the version of console firmware that is running on your computer. The system also provides information about how to update the firmware.

If you do not have the required version of console firmware, the system displays a message similar to the following:

%SYSBOOT-F-FIRMREV, Firmware rev.nnn is below the absolute minimum ofnnn.
          Please update your firmware to the recommended revision nnn,            
            Alpha Systems Firmware Update Vn.n.

If you do not have the recommended version of console firmware, the system displays a message similar to the following:

%SYSBOOT-W-FIRMREV, Firmware rev.nnn is below the recommended minimum ofnn.
         Please update your firmware to the recommended revision,
         which can be found on the firmware CD labeled:   
            Alpha Systems Firmware Update Vn.n.

The latest firmware CD is included with your OpenVMS Alpha media kit. It includes system firmware for current and recent Alpha systems and some I/O adapters. Firmware for older hardware might not be included on the current CD but can be found on previous CDs or online at:

http://ftp.digital.com/pub/DEC/Alpha/firmware/

HP recommends updating to the latest released firmware for all systems and I/O adapters. Firmware is released more often than the OpenVMS Alpha operating system. The firmware version recommendations included in OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 might be superseded before the next version of the OpenVMS Alpha operating system is released.

Firmware on Integrity Server Systems

HP Integrity servers include several firmware components (varying with system type), any of which might need updating. For the minimum versions recommended, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes. HP recommends that you sign up for Subscriber's Choice so that you can automatically receive email notices regarding the latest firmware updates. Make sure you register all your products to receive the appropriate firmware update notices. You can sign up for Subscriber's Choice at the following website:

http://itrc.hp.com

To update entry-class Integrity server firmware, follow the instructions provided in this section; for cell-based servers (midrange and high-end), contact HP Customer Support.

To update your firmware, perform the following steps:

  1. Determine the current firmware versions on your Integrity server (see Section ).

    Note:

    To receive notification of new firmware releases for the Integrity server you own, you can subscribe (free of charge) for drivers and software alerts, as instructed in Section .

  2. Create a firmware update CD on any system equipped with a CD or CD/DVD-recordable drive (see Section ).

    Note:

    HP continuously strives to improve firmware update methods. In a coming release, HP will provide a method that can be initiated from the running operating system. You will not have to update the firmware offline from a CD. To receive notification of new firmware releases for the Integrity server you own, you can subscribe (free of charge) for drivers and software alerts, as instructed in Section .

  3. Update the firmware on your Integrity server (see Section ).

Checking Firmware Version

To determine the firmware version in place on your Integrity server, you can use the Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) info fw command at the EFI Shell prompt, as in the following example. (For cell-based servers, check the firmware at the nPartition console.)

Shell> info fw

You can also use the EFI Boot Manager to obtain firmware information. With MP, you can use the MP sysrev command.

Note:

The info fw command at the EFI> Shell prompt cannot be used while OpenVMS is running. You can use the MP interface to check firmware on your system while OpenVMS is running.

Note:

EFI Shell commands are not case sensitive. However, in this manual, EFI and other Integrity server interface commands are displayed in lowercase to help distinguish them from OpenVMS DCL commands.

For more information about the latest firmware for your Integrity server, check the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes. In addition, see the information and resources provided on the HP Support website by following these steps:

  1. Go to the following website:

    http://www.hp.com/support/itaniumservers

  2. Select the appropriate server in the provided list.

    The HP Support page that appears provides a list of tasks and services to choose. To automatically receive drivers and support alerts from HP (free of charge), select “Signup: drivers and support alerts” from the list of services (you might need to select “See more...” to access the signup link), and fill out the forms as instructed.

    For more information about firmware for your Integrity server, select “Download drivers and software” from the list of tasks, and continue with the next step.

  3. On the “Download drivers and software” page, select “Cross operating system (BIOS, Firmware, Diagnostics, etc.)”.

  4. On the resulting page, locate the appropriate firmware (look for the latest update; previous versions might also be listed), and select the link for the firmware in the “Description” column.

  5. Select the “Release Notes” tab and read the information about the latest version of firmware available and the instructions on determining the version of firmware in place on your Integrity server. Compare your installed version with firmware versions listed in the release notes.

Creating a Firmware Update CD

To create a firmware update CD for your entry-class Integrity server, you need a CD-recordable drive and software, plus a blank CD-R or CD-RW disk. (For updating firmware on a cell-based server, you must contact HP Customer Support.)

Note:

The following instructions are for recording a DVD on an OpenVMS system. You can record the DVD on any system or PC, such as a Microsoft Windows computer, a Linux system, or an HP-UX system.

Note that in a future update, a tool will be available from HP that enables you to update the firmware while the operating system is running.

  1. Follow steps 1 through 3 from the preceding section.

  2. Locate the appropriate ISO-image firmware file. (Look for the latest update; previous versions might also be listed along with the latest.) Select the link for that file and read the instructions for the file included in the release notes, and then download the ISO-image firmware (zip-compressed) file to your system. (To access the release notes, see step 5 in the preceding section.)

  3. Unzip the firmware file into the corresponding .ISO file. The .ISO file is a block copy of the firmware disk for the Integrity server system. On OpenVMS systems, you can obtain the INFO-ZIP utility from an OpenVMS Freeware CD and use the UnZip utility provided with INFO-ZIP. OpenVMS Freeware CDs are packaged with the OpenVMS for Integrity Servers OE DVD, and the files on the Freeware CDs are available online at the following website:

    www.hp.com/go/openvms/freeware

    The following example shows the command for unzipping an .ISO image of the latest firmware for an rx2600 system (the file name changes with each update of the firmware available on the website):

    $ UNZIP PF_CPEAKSYS0nnn.ZIP
    Archive: SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSMGR]PF_CPEAKSYS0nnn.ZIP
     inflating: PF_CPEAKSYS0nnn.ISO
  4. Record the data on the CD, specifying the .ISO file as the source for the CD. For instructions on doing this, enter the following command:

    $ @SYS$MANAGER:CDRECORD HELP

    Note:

    OpenVMS software includes the CD recording tool CDRECORD. For online help, enter the @SYS$MANAGER:CDRECORD HELP command at the OpenVMS DCL prompt as shown previously. For CDRECORD source files, check the OpenVMS Open Source Tools CD supplied with your OpenVMS I64 OE DVD. For more information about the software, visit the following website:

    http://h71000.www7.hp.com/opensource/opensource.html

Updating Your Firmware from the Firmware Update CD

You update the firmware of an entry-class Integrity server from the firmware update CD created in the preceding section. For instructions, see the release notes provided for the firmware you downloaded.

Important:

To update Integrity server firmware on cell-based servers, contact HP Customer Support.

Device-Naming Conventions

When you perform specific operations, you are asked to specify a device name for the source drive and one for the target drive. When specifying those device names, note the following naming conventions:

  • When the source drive is a local CD or DVD drive, the device name is similar to the following:

    DQA0 (IDE drive) or DNA0 (USB drive)

    For a device name, such as DQA0:, note the following conventions:

    • DQ is the device code.

    • A is the device controller designation.

    • 0 is the unit number of the device.

  • When the target drive is a local disk, the device name is similar to the following:

    DKA0:

  • When the source drive is a virtual DVD drive served by the InfoServer, the device name is typically the following:

    DAD1:

  • On OpenVMS systems configured in certain OpenVMS Cluster or HSx environments, the device naming convention is similar to the following:

    DUA20.14.0.2.0

    The values you specify identify components such as the boot device, controller, unit number of the boot device, HSx controller node number, and channel numbers. Because these values vary depending on your specific hardware configuration, see the owner, operator, and technical service manuals that came with your computer for detailed information.

Using the Operating System Menu

The following sections describe how to use the operating system menu to install, upgrade, and modify your system disk, and perform other related tasks.

Note:

The OpenVMS Alpha CD and OpenVMS I64 DVD menu options are very similar. This section provides examples from the OpenVMS I64 menu system.

The OpenVMS operating system main menu displays automatically when you boot the OpenVMS operating system from the operating system media (for instructions on how to boot from the operating system media, see Section ). From the menu, you can choose options to perform any of the following tasks:

  • Install or upgrade the operating system from the operating system media.

  • Display a list of products that can be installed from the operating system media.

  • Install or upgrade layered products from the operating system media.

  • Show which products are installed on your system.

  • Reconfigure layered products installed on your system.

  • Remove products.

  • Find, install, and remove patches, and display and remove recovery data.

  • Enter the DCL environment from which you can perform preinstallation or maintenance tasks, such as mounting or showing devices and backing up or restoring files on the system disk.

  • Shut down the system.

The following is a sample display of the OpenVMS main menu:

  OpenVMS I64 Operating System, Version 8.3-1H1

  (c) Copyright 1976-2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.

  Installing required known files...

  Configuring devices... 

  ***************************************************************
  You can install or upgrade the OpenVMS I64 operating system
  or you can install or upgrade layered products that are included
  on the OpenVMS I64 distribution media (CD/DVD). 

  You can also execute DCL commands and procedures to perform
  "standalone" tasks, such as backing up the system disk. 
  
  Please choose one of the following:

    1) Upgrade, install or reconfigure OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1
    2) Display layered products that this procedure can install
    3) Install or upgrade layered products
    4) Show installed products     
    5) Reconfigure installed products
    6) Remove installed products
    7) Find, Install or Undo patches; Show or Delete recovery data
    8) Execute DCL commands and procedures
    9) Shut down this system      
    
Enter CHOICE or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/?)

Review the following sections to understand how the menu works. Then you can choose appropriate menu options when you are asked to do so before, during, and after an installation or upgrade.

Using the Install, Upgrade, or Reconfigure OpenVMS Option (1)

Select option 1 on the operating system main menu to install, upgrade, or reconfigure your OpenVMS software. Selecting option 1 implements a PCSI utility concept called a platform. The OpenVMS platform contains:

Note:

For use of Instant Capacity (iCAP), Temporary Instant Capacity (TiCAP), Global Instant Capacity (GiCAP), and Pay per use (PPU) (supported on cell-based Integrity servers), and for support of such products as gWLM and HP Systems Insight Manager (HP SIM), you must install TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS. SSL for OpenVMS is required and is installed automatically.

Global Instant Capacity (GiCAP) is managed from HP-UX management agents only.

Including the optional products in the OpenVMS platform allows you to install or upgrade these products along with the OpenVMS operating system.

When you choose to upgrade the system disk, and the OpenVMS software on the disk is the same version, you are given options to reinstall or to reconfigure the OpenVMS system or reconfigure the OpenVMS platform.

Before installing or upgrading OpenVMS, see the information in the following chapters, as appropriate:

Note:

Before installing or upgrading OpenVMS on a target drive in an OpenVMS Cluster, make sure the target system disk is not mounted elsewhere in the cluster. The target system disk must be dismounted clusterwide (except on the system from which the installation or upgrade is being performed) and must remain so during the installation or upgrade.

When you select option 1 on the operating system main menu, the system asks whether you want to preserve or initialize the system disk. The display is similar to the following:

    There are two choices for Installation/Upgrade:

    INITIALIZE - Removes all software and data files that were     
      previously on the target disk and installs OpenVMS I64.   

    PRESERVE -- Installs or upgrades OpenVMS I64 on the target disk 
      and retains all other contents of the target disk.

    * Note: You cannot use PRESERVE to install OpenVMS I64 on a disk on
   which any other operating system is installed. This includes
   implementations of OpenVMS for other architectures.

Do you want to INITIALIZE or to PRESERVE? [PRESERVE] 

INITIALIZE Option

When you specify the INITIALIZE option, the following operations take place:

  • All software and data files that already exist on the target disk are removed. The software can only be recovered from a backup of the disk, so make sure that you either have a backup or will not need the data again.

  • The operating system is installed.

Specify the INITIALIZE option and perform a full installation under any of the following conditions:

  • If your computer is new (it has never had any version of any operating system running on it, including factory-installed software).

  • If your computer is already running a version of the OpenVMS operating system and you want to overwrite the entire contents of the system disk (the operating system, application software, and user files).

  • If you want to keep an existing system disk and install OpenVMS on a different disk.

  • If you are running the OpenVMS operating system but cannot upgrade. For example, if you changed the names of system directories on the system disk, the upgrade procedure will not work correctly. Therefore, unless you restore the system disk to its original directory structure, you must reinstall the operating system using the INITIALIZE option.

Note:

During initialization of an OpenVMS I64 target system disk, the installation process creates a diagnostic partition, visible only at the console prompt. For more information about this partition and options you can take, see Appendix J.

For systems that support the Instant Capacity (iCAP) feature, CPU status (how many cores are available and how much time they have remaining) is not affected by initialization of the system disk. Such information is stored in NVRAM on the Integrity server.

PRESERVE Option

When you specify the PRESERVE option, the following operations take place:

IF ...THEN ...

The OpenVMS operating system is not already installed on the target disk

  • The operating system is installed.

  • All other contents of the target disk are retained.

The OpenVMS operating system is installed on the target disk

The operating system is upgraded, as follows:

  • Old operating system files and new files are merged or replaced.

  • All other contents of the target disk are retained.

Note:

If you intend to choose the PRESERVE option (because there are certain files on the disk that you want to retain), HP recommends that you first make a backup copy of your system disk. If there is any problem during the installation or upgrade that might affect the integrity of the disk, you will have the backup copy as a safeguard.

If you choose the PRESERVE option and choose a target disk that already contains the OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 software, you are provided with the option to either reconfigure or reinstall the OpenVMS operating system:

  • Reconfigure the operating system if you want to change the options you chose to include when the operating system was installed.

  • Reinstall the operating system if you think that your system files might have become corrupted.

For additional configuration information, see Section .

Using the Display Layered Products Option (2)

Use option 2 to display layered products that can be installed.

Note:

Although option 2 displays any patch kits available from the OpenVMS distribution media, HP recommends using option 7 to display patch kits; option 7 enables you to specify locations to search in addition to the standard location.

When you select option 2 on the operating system main menu, the following information is displayed:

  • The version of OpenVMS and versions of the required components and optional products that can be installed or upgraded when you select option 1 on the main menu.

  • The layered product kits that are available for installation when you select option 3 on the operating system main menu. The DECwindows graphical user interface and HP networking products are shown again, along with other layered products.

Note:

The two lists of products (the products that can be installed or upgraded and the layered product kits available for installation) might be the same or very similar. Generally, products that can be installed or upgraded along with the OpenVMS operating system should be installed or upgraded with the OpenVMS operating system.

The following is an example of a display. WBEMCIM is the file name used in the PCSI kit for the WBEM Services for OpenVMS product, which is available on OpenVMS I64 systems only. CIM stands for the Common Information Model, which differentiates the current OpenVMS WBEM product from the original one that is based on the Simple Network Maintenance Protocol (SNMP). The version numbers in this example do not necessarily reflect the version numbers of the products actually shipped with OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1.

     The following versions of the OpenVMS operating system, 
     required components and optional other products 
     are available on the OpenVMS distribution media (CD/DVD).
     They can be installed by selecting option 1:

   HP I64VMS VMS version V8.3-1H1
   HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3-1H1
   HP I64VMS CDSA version V2.3-306
   HP I64VMS KERBEROS version V3.1-152
   HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284
   HP I64VMS TDC_RT version V2.3-1
   HP I64VMS WBEMCIM version V2.61-A070728
   HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS version  V1.5-31   
   HP I64VMS DWMOTIF version V1.6
   HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS version V8.3-1H1
   HP I64VMS DECNET_PHASE_IV version V8.3-1H1
   HP I64VMS TCPIP version V5.6



     The following Layered Product kits are available on the OpenVMS
     Distribution media (CD/DVD). They can be installed by selecting
     option 3. If they are already installed, they can be reconfigured
     by selecting option 5, or removed by selecting option 6.

   ----------------------------------- ----------- ----------
   PRODUCT                              KIT TYPE   KIT FORMAT
   ----------------------------------- ----------- ----------
   HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3-1H1    Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306              Full LP    Compressed  
   HP I64VMS DECNET_PHASE_IV V8.3-1H1   Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3-1H1       Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6               Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS DWMOTIF_SUPPORT V8.3-1H1   Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152          Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284               Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6                 Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS TDC_RT V2.3-1              Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728      Full LP    Compressed
   HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31      Full LP    Compressed
   ----------------------------------- ----------- ----------

   12 items found

   Press Return to continue...

Using the Install or Upgrade Layered Products Option (3)

Use option 3 on the operating system main menu for normal installations or upgrades of the layered products.

Note:

Although option 3 installs any patch kits available from the OpenVMS distribution media, HP recommends using option 7 to install patch kits; option 7 enables you to install patch kits that are not located in the standard location. In addition, option 7 saves recovery data; when you use option 7 to remove patch kits, only kits with recovery data are removed.

You can use option 1 to install or upgrade the DECwindows graphical user interface and HP networking products along with the OpenVMS operating system. 

When you select option 3, the PCSI utility allows you to choose whether to install layered products or to register layered products that are on the target disk but are not in the Product Database. If you attempt to reinstall the same version of a product that is already installed, the product is reinstalled. Note that any patches that were applied to the product are removed. If you want to reconfigure, select the reconfigure option (5) on the main menu.

As of Version 8.3, most of the software kits included on the OpenVMS distribution media are signed using Secure Delivery. When you use option 3 of the OpenVMS I64 operating system menu, these kits are validated by the PCSI utility. When you use option 3 from the OpenVMS Alpha operating system menu, these kits are not validated; this restriction is due to the CD’s space limitations. You can install kits created before the secure delivery process was enabled in OpenVMS Version 8.3. (However, after you install or upgrade to OpenVMS Version 8.3 or later, signed kits that you install subsequently are validated, including any signed kits included on the distribution media.) The DCL command PRODUCT SHOW HISTORY displays the validation status of these kits as unsigned rather than as a validated kit.

As shown in the following example, you are also prompted for a target disk and asked whether you want brief or detailed descriptions. The procedure presents a list of products and allows you to select any or all of these products. Alternatively, you can exit without installing or upgrading any products.

Note:

The layered products listed include the required CDSA, Kerberos, SSL, TDC, Availability Manager, and for OpenVMS I64 only, WBEM Services for OpenVMS, and WBEM Providers for OpenVMS. Also included are the optional DECwindows, DECnet Phase IV, DECnet-Plus, and TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS products. Support of such features as Instant Capacity (iCAP), Temporary Instant Capacity (TiCAP), Global Instant Capacity (GiCAP), and Pay per use (PPU), and for products such as gWLM and HP SIM, requires TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS. When you use HP SIM to provision OpenVMS on an Integrity server, TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS is installed automatically.

You can install (or upgrade to) the new implementation of TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS (Version 5.6) as part of the OpenVMS upgrade. If you want to install Version 5.6 separately, choose the following product, selecting the appropriate option as in the example that follows.

    HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6
   ***********************************************************

   The procedure will ask a series of questions.

   () - encloses acceptable answers
   [] - encloses default answers

   Type your response and press the <Return> key. Type:

   ? - to repeat an explanation
   ^ - to change prior input (not always possible)
   Ctrl/Y - to exit the installation procedure

Do you want to INSTALL or REGISTER? (INSTALL/REGISTER/?) [INSTALL] INSTALL
    ***********************************************************

   If you choose to install or upgrade DECwindows Motif,
   please note the following:

   o If you did not select the OpenVMS DECwindows server support
     and workstation files options, DECwindows Motif will not run.
     You must add these options to use DECwindows Motif.

   If you choose to install or upgrade DECnet-Plus or DECnet Phase IV,
   please note the following:

   o If you did not select the OpenVMS DECnet option, neither version
     of DECnet will run. You must add this option to use DECnet.

   If you want to install a patch kit, please use main menu option 7.

Press Return to continue...

   You must enter the device name for the target disk on which
   the layered product(s) installation will be performed.

Enter device name for target disk: [DKB300] (? for choices) DKB300

   DKB300: is labeled V82SYS.


   The install operation can provide brief or detailed descriptions.
   In either case, you can request the detailed descriptions by typing "?".

Do you always want detailed descriptions? (Yes/No) [No] NO

 1 - HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3-1H1      Layered Product
 2 - HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306                Layered Product
 3 - HP I64VMS DECNET_PHASE_IV V8.3-1H1     Layered Product
 4 - HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3-1H1         Layered Product
 5 - HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6                 Layered Product
 6 - HP I64VMS DWMOTIF_SUPPORT V8.3-1H1     Layered Product
 7 - HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152            Layered Product
 8 - HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284                 Layered Product
 9 - HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6                   Layered Product  
10 - HP I64VMS TDC_RT V2.3-1                Layered Product
11 - HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728        Layered Product
12 - HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31        Layered Product
13 - All products listed above 
 ? - Help
 E - Exit

Choose one or more items from the menu separated by commas: 9

Note:

When you boot the OpenVMS operating system media and select the option to install layered products, the installation procedure for the selected layered product(s) does not run the Installation Verification Procedure (IVP) for layered products. Because the operating system is booted from the media and the layered products are installed on a different device (the target drive), the IVPs cannot execute correctly. However, you can run the IVP for each layered product after you boot the target system (see the layered product installation documents for information about running the IVP).

Using the Show Installed Products Option (4)

Use option 4 on the operating system main menu to display a list of products that have been installed on a selected target disk by the PCSI utility. Products that were installed by VMSINSTAL or other installation methods do not appear in this display unless they have been registered in the PCSI utility’s product database.

The following is a sample display of the prompts and information that appear when you select option 4. WBEM Services for OpenVMS and WBEM Providers for OpenVMS are available on OpenVMS I64 systems only. The version numbers in this example do not necessarily reflect the version numbers of the products actually shipped with OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1.

   You must enter the device name for the system disk for which
   you want to display installed products.

   If you enter an invalid device or one which is not a system disk
   an error will occur.

   (Enter "^" and press Return to return to main menu.)

Enter device name for system disk: [DKB300] (? for choices) DKB300
%MOUNT-I-MOUNTED, V82SYS mounted on _DKB300:

   The default is an 80-column display that does not include
   Maintenance (patches) or Referenced by information.

Do you want the full, 132-column display? (Yes/No) [No] NO

------------------------------------- ------------ ------------
PRODUCT                               KIT TYPE     STATE
------------------------------------- ------------ ------------
HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3-1H1     Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306               Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3-1H1        Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6                Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS DWMOTIF_SUPPORT V8.3-1H1    Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152           Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1            Platform     Installed
HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6                  Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS VMS V8.3-1H1                Oper System  Installed
HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284                Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS TDC_RT V2.3-1               Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728       Full LP      Installed
HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31       Full LP      Installed
------------------------------------- ------------ ------------

12 items found
Do you wish to display product history? (Yes/No) [No] YES

----------------------------------- ----------- ----------- --------------------
PRODUCT                             KIT TYPE    OPERATION   DATE AND TIME
----------------------------------- ----------- ----------- --------------------
HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3-1H1   Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306             Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3-1H1      Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6              Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152         Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1          Platform    Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6                Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS VMS V8.3-1H1              Oper System Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284              Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728     Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31     Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS TDC_RT V2.3-1             Full LP     Install     25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3       Full LP     Remove      25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS CDSA V2.2                 Full LP     Remove      25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS DECNET_PHASE_IV V8.3      Full LP     Remove      25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6              Full LP     Remove      25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3              Platform    Remove      25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS VMS V8.3                  Oper System Remove      25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3               Transition  Remove      25-SEP-2007 18:04:23
HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3               Transition  Reg Product 25-SEP-2007 17:20:44
HP I64VMS CDSA V2.1                 Full LP     Install     27-AUG-2004 21:07:15
HP I64VMS DECNET_PHASE_IV V8.2      Full LP     Install     27-AUG-2004 21:07:15
HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.5              Full LP     Install     27-AUG-2004 21:07:15
HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3              Platform    Install     27-AUG-2004 21:07:15
HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.4-18             Full LP     Install     27-AUG-2004 21:07:15
HP I64VMS VMS V8.3                  Oper System Install     27-AUG-2004 21:07:15
----------------------------------- ----------- ----------- --------------------

26 items found

Press Return to continue...

Note:

The products listed in the product history vary from system to system, depending on the actual history of the system. For definitions of the kit types, see the HP POLYCENTER Software Installation Utility Developer’s Guide.

Using the Reconfigure Installed Products Option (5)

Use option 5 to reconfigure layered products, including the DECwindows graphical user interface and HP networking products. This allows you to change the product choices you made during a previous installation or upgrade.

You can reconfigure a product only if all of the following conditions are true:

  • The product is available for installation while your system is booted from the operating system media. For information about displaying products that are available for installation, see Section  (option 2 on the main menu).

  • The product is installed. For information about displaying installed products, see Section  (option 4 on the main menu).

  • The version of the product that is available for installation is the same as the version of the product that is installed.

When you select option 5 on the operating system main menu, the procedure prompts you for a target disk name and asks whether you want brief or detailed descriptions about the reconfiguration options. The procedure then lists the products you can configure. You can select any or all of these products, or you can exit without reconfiguring products.

The following is a sample display of the prompts and information that might appear when you select option 5. The version numbers in this example do not necessarily reflect the version numbers of the products actually shipped with OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1.

   This procedure will ask a series of questions.

      () - encloses acceptable answers
      [] - encloses default answers

   Type your response and press the <Return> key. Type:

      ? - to repeat an explanation
      ^ - to change prior input (not always possible)
      Ctrl/Y - to exit the installation procedure


   You must enter the device name for the target disk on which
   the layered product(s) reconfiguration will be performed.

Enter device name for target disk: [DKB300] (? for choices) DKB300

   DKB300: is labeled V82SYS.


   The reconfigure operation can provide brief or detailed descriptions.
   In either case, you can request the detailed descriptions by typing "?".

Do you always want detailed descriptions? (Yes/No) [No] NO

 1 - HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3-1H1   Layered Product
 2 - HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306             Layered Product
 3 - HP I64VMS DECNET_PHASE_IV V8.3-1H1  Layered Product
 4 - HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3-1H1      Layered Product
 5 - HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6              Layered Product
 6 - HP I64VMS DWMOTIF_SUPPORT V8.3-1H1  Layered Product
 7 - HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152         Layered Product
 8 - HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284              Layered Product
 9 - HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6                Layered Product  
10 - HP I64VMS TDC_RT V2.3-1             Layered Product
11 - HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728     Layered Product
12 - HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31     Layered Product
13 - All products listed above
 ? - Help
 E - Exit
 
Choose one or more items from the menu separated by commas:

Using the Remove Installed Products Option (6)

Option 6 allows you to remove products that were installed or registered with the PCSI utility. (This option removes complete products. To remove patches, use option 7, as described in Section .)

Important:

Do not remove the following system-integrated products (SIPs): Availability Manager, CDSA, Kerberos, SSL, TDC_RT, WBEM Services for OpenVMS (WBEMCIM), and WBEM Providers for OpenVMS. These products are tightly bound with the operating system. Attempts to remove any of these products might not work as expected and can create undesirable side effects.

When you select option 6, you are prompted for a target disk name and whether you want brief or detailed descriptions about the remove options. The procedure then lists the products you can remove. You can select any or all of these products, or you can exit without removing any products.

The following is a sample display of the prompts and information that appear when you select option 6. The version numbers in this example do not necessarily reflect the version numbers of the products actually shipped with OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1.

   This procedure will ask a series of questions.

      () - encloses acceptable answers
      [] - encloses default answers

   Type your response and press the <Return> key. Type:

      ? - to repeat an explanation
      ^ - to change prior input (not always possible)
      Ctrl/Y - to exit the installation procedure


   You must enter the device name for the target disk on which
   the layered product(s) removal will be performed.

Enter device name for target disk: [DKB300:] (? for choices) DKB300

   DKB300: is labeled V82SYS.


   The remove operation can provide brief or detailed descriptions.
   In either case, you can request the detailed descriptions by typing "?".

Do you always want detailed descriptions? (Yes/No) [No] NO

 1 - HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3       Layered Product
 2 - HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306             Layered Product
 3 - HP I64VMS DECNET_PHASE_IV V8.3      Layered Product
 4 - HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3          Layered Product
 5 - HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6              Layered Product
 6 - HP I64VMS DWMOTIF_SUPPORT V8.3      Layered Product
 7 - HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152         Layered Product
 8 - HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284              Layered Product
 9 - HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6                Layered Product  
10 - HP I64VMS TDC_RT V2.3-1             Layered Product
11 - HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728     Layered Product
12 - HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31     Layered Product
13 - All products listed above 
 ? - Help
 E - Exit
 
Choose one or more items from the menu separated by commas:

Using the Patches and Recovery Data Option (7)

Select option 7 to install or undo patches and to perform related operations. When you select option 7, the following options submenu appears:

  This procedure can perform one of the following operations:

    1) Install one or more patches
    2) Undo recent patches for which there is recovery data
    3) Show recovery data
    4) Delete recovery data     
    5) Find patch kits   
    
Enter CHOICE or X to return to main menu: (1/2/3/4/5/X)

Note the following about these options:

  • When you choose submenu option 1, the following information is displayed:

       NOTE: Some patch kits cannot be correctly installed by this         
             procedure; this includes patch kits for versions of
             OpenVMS prior to V8.3.  Patches for OpenVMS V8.3 and
             later install correctly.  For patches to other products,
             check with the patch kit provider, or install the patch
             from the running system.
    
             Options 2 through 5 (undo, show, delete, and find) will work
             correctly for all patch kits.
  • When you choose submenu option 1, 2, 3, or 4, you are prompted for the target device on which to perform the operation:

       You must enter the device name for the target disk on which
       the operation will be performed.
      
    Enter device name for target disk: (? for choices) [DKB300]
  • When you choose submenu option 1, you are prompted to choose detailed or brief descriptions, as follows:

       The patch operation can provide brief or detailed descriptions.
       In either case, you can request the detailed descriptions by typing ?.
    
    Do you always want detailed descriptions? (Yes/No) [No]
  • For each of the submenu options (1 through 5), you are prompted for the patch kit source. You can specify alternate locations. You can use wildcards when you specify the location. The prompt and introductory information are displayed as follows:

       This procedure will look for patch kits in
       
              SYS$SYSDEVICE:[KITS.*]
    
       If you want to add an additional location, enter the
       device and directory specification and press return.
       Wildcards are allowed. For example:
    
              dka100:[dir1]
              dkb0:[dir1,dir2]
              dka200:[dir1,*]
              dkb300:[dir1...]
    
       Enter the single letter "D" to reset the default location.
    
       If you do not want to add an additional location, just press return
       without entering anything. 
    
    Enter additional location, D, or just press Return:

After you provide the necessary information, a PCSI /PRODUCT command automatically performs the operation you requested. If you chose options 1, 2, or 4 from the submenu, the PCSI utility prompts you for additional input and displays additional information.

Using the Execute DCL Option (8)

When you select option 8, you get access to a subset of DCL commands (such as SHOW DEVICE, MOUNT, and BACKUP) to perform specific preinstallation and maintenance operations. Note, however, that this is a restricted DCL environment in that certain DCL commands (such as PRODUCT) and certain utilities (such as VMSINSTAL) do not function as expected because you are booting from read-only or write-locked media, and because a full system startup has not been performed.

A triple dollar sign prompt ($$$) indicates that you are in this restricted DCL environment, as in the following example:

$$$ SHOW DEVICE

To exit the DCL environment and return to the main menu, enter the LOGOUT command.

Using the Shutdown Option (9)

When you select option 9 on the operating system main menu, your system shuts down and you are returned to the console prompt (>>> on Alpha systems; P00>>> on Integrity servers). The system displays a message similar to the following (this example shows the message from an OpenVMS I64 system):

   Shutting down the system

     SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE

**** Primary HALTED with code HWRPB_HALT$K_REMAIN_HALTED

****   Hit any key to cold reboot   ****
P00>>>

Making the Install/Upgrade/Backup Selection

Now that you have reviewed key terms, examined hardware and software requirements, and learned how to use the menu system included on the OpenVMS operating system media, you can do the following:

IF ...THEN GO TO...

You want to install the operating system in an OpenVMS Cluster environment

Chapter 2, and then Chapter 3. Perform postinstallation tasks described in Chapter 7.

You want to install the operating system in a nonclustered environment

Chapter 3. Perform postinstallation tasks described in Chapter 7.

You want to upgrade the operating system in an OpenVMS Cluster environment

Chapter 4, Chapter 5, and then Chapter 6. Perform postupgrade tasks described in Chapter 7.

You want to upgrade the operating system in a standalone environment

Chapter 4, and then Chapter 6. Perform postupgrade tasks described in Chapter 7.

You want only to back up or restore your system disk

Appendix F.

Chapter 2 Preparing to Install in an OpenVMS Cluster Environment

This chapter contains information to review and steps to perform before installing OpenVMS in an OpenVMS Cluster environment. If you are not installing your operating system in an OpenVMS Cluster environment, go to Chapter 3 for information about installing your system.

Preinstallation Tasks for OpenVMS Cluster Environments

Use the checklist in Table 2.1 to ensure that you perform all necessary tasks prior to installing your system in an OpenVMS Cluster environment.

Preinstallation Checklist

 TaskSection
Review relevant OpenVMS operating system and OpenVMS Cluster documentation.Section 
Familiarize yourself with mixed-version, mixed-architecture, and migration support in OpenVMS Cluster systems.Section 
Have information ready to provide at the system prompt during an installation.Section 
Make sure the target system disk is not mounted elsewhere in the cluster.Section 
Begin the installation.Chapter 3

Review OpenVMS Cluster Information

Before you install the operating system in an OpenVMS Cluster environment, review any relevant OpenVMS Cluster information contained in the following documents.

OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 Documents

  • The Cover Letter for HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers

  • The Software Product Descriptions included with your distribution kit

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes

OpenVMS Version 8.3 Documents

Information in the following documents remains valid except where superseded by the OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 documents listed previously.

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 New Features and Documentation Overview

Earlier OpenVMS Documents

Information in the following documents remains valid except where superseded by the OpenVMS documents listed previously.

  • HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems

  • Guidelines for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations

Be sure to consult your network or system manager as well.

Mixed-Version Support in OpenVMS Cluster Systems

HP provides two levels of support for mixed-version and mixed-architecture OpenVMS Cluster systems: warranted support and migration support.

Warranted support means that HP has fully qualified the two specified versions coexisting in an OpenVMS Cluster and will address all problems identified by customers using this configuration.

Migration support means that HP has qualified the versions for use together in configurations that are migrating in a staged fashion to a newer version of OpenVMS VAX, OpenVMS Alpha, or OpenVMS I64. Problem reports submitted against these configurations will be answered by HP. However, in exceptional cases, HP may request that you move to a warranted configuration as part of the solution. Migration support helps customers move to warranted OpenVMS Cluster pairs. For the minimum version supported for an upgrade to OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1, see Section .

Warranted cluster support is provided for the combinations shown in Table 2.2. (OpenVMS VAX systems are not supported with OpenVMS I64 systems in the same cluster.)

Warranted Cluster Support

Operating systemWarranted in these combinations

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 or 8.3

or

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and OpenVMS VAX Version 7.3

  

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 or 8.3 and OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3

or

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 and OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3

Note:

Only two architectures are supported in the same OpenVMS Cluster.

System disks are architecture specific and can be shared only by systems of the same architecture. An Alpha and I64 system, or an Alpha and VAX system, cannot boot from the same system disk. However, cross-architecture satellite booting is supported between an Alpha and VAX system. When you configure an OpenVMS Cluster to take advantage of cross-architecture booting, make sure that at least one system from each architecture is configured with a disk that can be used for installations and upgrades. For more information, see the Guidelines for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations and HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems.

Table 2.3 shows the supported migration pairs.

Supported Migration Pairs

Operating systemSupported with either of these migrating to OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1Supported with either of these migrating to OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.2-1

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.2

OpenVMS Alpha Version 7.3-2

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.2-1

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.2

OpenVMS Alpha Version 7.3-2

For more information, see the OpenVMS Technical Software Support Service website at:

http://www.hp.com/go/openvms/support

In addition, see the OpenVMS Operating System Support Chart at:

http://www.hp.com/go/openvms/supportchart

Before introducing an OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 system into an existing OpenVMS Cluster, you might need to install certain patch kits (also known as remedial kits) on cluster members running earlier versions of OpenVMS. For a complete list of required patch kits, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes and the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes.

For information about supporting the TDC_RT software in OpenVMS Clusters, see Section .

OpenVMS Cluster Information You Need

If during the installation you answer YES to the system prompt asking whether your system will be a member of an OpenVMS Cluster, you need to provide the following information after you boot the system disk:

Required InformationExplanation

Type of configuration

Configuration types (CI, DSSI, SCSI, local area, or mixed-interconnect) are distinguished by the interconnect device that the VAX, Alpha, or Integrity server computers in the OpenVMS Cluster use to communicate with one another. Note that HP Integrity servers do not support CI, DSSI, or MEMORY CHANNEL devices.

DECnet node name and node address

To obtain the DECnet node name and node address for the computer on which you are installing the OpenVMS operating system, consult the network or system manager. If you install DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS (Phase V) software and do not plan to use DECnet Phase IV for OpenVMS addresses, then you do not need to provide this information.

Allocation class value

During the installation procedure, you might be asked for the allocation class value (ALLOCLASS) of the computer on which you are installing the OpenVMS operating system. For example:

Enter a value for this_node ALLOCLASS parameter:

Note that in an OpenVMS Cluster environment, the allocation class value cannot be zero if the node serves DSSI or CI disks to other cluster members, or if volume shadowing will be used on this system or in the cluster. In either case, the ALLOCLASS value must be a number from 1 to 255.

After you enter the allocation class value, the installation procedure uses it to automatically set the value of the ALLOCLASS system parameter.

HP recommends that you thoroughly review the chapter on cluster storage devices in the HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manual. This manual also includes the rules for specifying allocation class values.

Whether you want a quorum disk

To help you determine whether you need a quorum disk in the cluster, see the HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manual.

Location of the page and swap files

On a nonclustered system, the page and swap files are on one or more local disks, but on a clustered system, the files might be on one or more local or clustered disks. See the HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manual to help you determine where the page and swap files will be located for the system on which you are installing the OpenVMS operating system software.

Systems that will be a MOP server[a], disk server, or tape server

If you are going to set up either a local area or a mixed-interconnect cluster, you need to make these determinations.

Cluster group number and cluster password[b]

If you are going to set up a local area or mixed-interconnect cluster that is LAN-based (Gigabit Ethernet), use the following rules to determine the cluster group number and password:

  • Cluster group number—A number in the range from 1 to 4095 or 61440 to 65535.

  • Cluster password—Must be from 1 to 31 alphanumeric characters in length and can include dollar signs ($) and underscores(_).

[a] Servers that use the Maintenance Operations Protocol (MOP).

[b] Cluster group number and password are required by any cluster nodes that use the local area network for cluster communications. In a cluster that uses mixed interconnects, if any of the interconnects require the cluster number and password, then you must set the cluster number and password for all nodes.

Dismounting the Target System Disk Elsewhere in the Cluster

Before installing OpenVMS on a target drive in an OpenVMS Cluster, make sure the target system disk is not mounted elsewhere in the cluster. The target system disk must be dismounted clusterwide (except on the system from which the installation is being performed) and must remain so during the installation. For instructions on dismounting cluster disks, see Section .

Beginning the Installation

After you have completed all the tasks in this chapter, go to Chapter 3 to begin the installation.

Chapter 3 Installing the OpenVMS Operating System

This chapter explains how to install the OpenVMS Alpha and I64 operating systemsOpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 operating system. It includes sample output similar to what you might see during an installation and explains how to respond to the prompts.

If you purchased a system with the operating system preinstalled, then most of the information in this chapter does not apply. The first time you power up your preinstalled system, you are prompted to enter only the information necessary to customize your installation. See the documentation provided with your system.

This chapter includes the procedures for booting the OpenVMS operating system kit. The boot procedures differ significantly between Alpha and Itanium-based systems. For additional information about booting Alpha systems, see Appendix A. Information about setting up and booting Itanium-based systems is located in Appendix BIf you are installing OpenVMS for the first time, see this appendix..If you are installing OpenVMS for the first time, see the appropriate appendix.

Once the system kit is booted, the procedures for installing OpenVMS Alpha and OpenVMS I64 are very similar.

Note:

Before you install the OpenVMS operating system, ensure that the correct version of firmware is running in your computer. For information about Alpha system firmware, see Section . For I64 system firmware, see Section .

This chapter is organized into sections and steps that describe the major tasks for installing OpenVMS, in the order in which these tasks must be performed. Section  includes a checklist that you can use to make sure you perform all the installation tasks described in this chapter.

Installation Tasks

Use the checklist in Table 3.1 to ensure that you perform all necessary installation tasks.

Installation Checklist

  TaskSection
 

Boot the OpenVMS operating system media.

Section 

 Install the OpenVMS operating system onto a system disk.Section 
 

Boot the OpenVMS system disk.

Section 

 Join the OpenVMS Cluster (optional).Section 
 Run AUTOGEN.Section 
 Reboot the operating system after AUTOGEN completes (this should occur automatically).Section 
 Log in to the SYSTEM account.Section 
 Perform postinstallation tasks, as necessary.Chapter 7

Booting the OpenVMS Operating System Media

The OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 operating system includes procedures and tools (such as the PCSI utility) that enable you to install the operating system easily. These tools are available once you boot the system properly. First, you must boot the OpenVMS Alpha CD or the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD. To boot the OpenVMS Alpha system CD, see Section . To boot the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD, see Section .

Booting the OpenVMS Alpha CD

This section explains how to boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD, either from your local CD drive, as described in Section , or from a CD drive served by the InfoServer, as described in Section . First, you need to identify the name of the CD drive, as explained in Section . For more information about booting operations, see Section .

Determining the Boot Device

To boot the operating system CD, you need to determine the identity of the CD drive. Follow these steps:

  1. Insert the operating system CD into the local CD drive.

  2. Enter the SHOW DEVICE command at the console prompt (>>>) and look for the correct drive listed in the output (for example, DKA400). If you are booting from the InfoServer, look for a device listed with its hardware address, as in the last line of the following example (EWA0):

    >>> SHOW DEVICE
    dva0.0.0.1000.0    DVA0                     RX23
    dka200.2.0.5.0     DKA200                   RZ28M  1004
    dka300.3.0.5.0     DKA300                   RZ29B  0016
    dka400.4.0.5.0     DKA400                   RRD42  442E
    ewa0.0.0.3.0       EWA0         00-00-F8-1F-70-3D

    For additional information, see the HP OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and HP OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 Software Product Description (SPD 82.35.xx) and the hardware manuals that you received with your Alpha computer.

Booting from the Local Drive

To boot the operating system CD from the local CD drive, enter the boot command in the following format:

BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 source-drive

Substitute the device name of the CD drive for source-drive, such as DKA400, as listed in the SHOW DEVICE display example in Section . In this case, you would enter the following command and press Enter:

>>>  BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 DKA400

Booting from the InfoServer

To boot the operating system CD using either the InfoServer hardware or the InfoServer utility, follow these steps. To use the InfoServer utility, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only), as described in Appendix C; note that the operating system CD must be mounted systemwide.

  1. Make sure that your operating system CD is being served from either the InfoServer hardware or the InfoServer utility. If you are using the InfoServer utility, certain configuration steps are required (one time only); see Appendix C.

  2. At the console prompt, enter the boot command in the following format:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 -FILE APB_0831H1 lan-device-name
    

    Substitute the name of the local area network device for lan-device-name, such as EWA0, as listed in the SHOW DEVICE display example in Section .

    The APB file name is the unique file name that was assigned to the APB.EXE file when it was copied from the operating system CD to the InfoServer. This file is the name of the APB program used for the initial system load (ISL) boot program.

    Note:

    If you are using a DEC 3000 or 4000 series system, note the following:

    • On DEC 3000 series systems, you can boot through the InfoServer using an alternate TURBOchannel device, such as a PMAD (Ethernet) or DEFTA (FDDI), by specifying the device name as “n/ESA0”. The value for n is the TURBOchannel slot number, which you can obtain by entering the SHOW CONFIGURATION command at the console prompt (>>>) and examining the display. For more information, see Section .

    • On DEC 4000 series systems, you must specify the ISL file name in uppercase (APB_0831H1).

  3. The InfoServer ISL program then displays the following menu:

       
     Network Initial System Load Function
     Version 1.2
    
    
       FUNCTION         FUNCTION
         ID
         1     -        Display Menu
         2     -        Help
         3     -        Choose Service
         4     -        Select Options
         5     -        Stop
    
     Enter a function ID value:
  4. Respond to the prompts as follows, pressing Enter after each entry:

    1. Enter 3 for the function ID.

    2. Enter 2 for the option ID.

    3. Enter the service name (ALPHA083 is the default service name for the InfoServer hardware; for the InfoServer utility, ask your system or network manager for the service name).

    A sample display follows:

     Enter a function ID value: 3
         OPTION          OPTION
        ID
        1     -       Find Services
        2     -       Enter known Service Name
    
     Enter an Option ID value: 2
    .Enter a Known Service Name: ALPHA0831H1

Note:

If you boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD from an InfoServer but lose your connection during the installation procedure (the system is unresponsive and pressing Ctrl/Y does not return you to the menu), do the following:

IF ... THEN ...

You previously chose the INITIALIZE option

  1. Boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD again from the network.

  2. Choose the install option (1) on the menu and perform the installation again, as described in this chapter.

You previously chose the PRESERVE option

  1. Boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD again from the network.

  2. Enter the DCL environment by choosing option 8 on the menu.

  3. Mount the device containing your backup copy of the target disk and the device that is your target disk.

  4. Restore the backup copy of your target disk by entering the appropriate BACKUP commands. (See Appendix F for complete information about using MOUNT and BACKUP commands to restore a system disk.)

  5. Log out from the DCL environment.

  6. Choose the install option (1) on the menu and perform the installation again, as described in this chapter.

Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD

You can boot the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD in any of the following ways. This section gives detailed instructions on booting from the local DVD drive. Detailed instructions on the other methods are available in the appendixes, as noted in the corresponding sections to follow.

  • From your local DVD drive (Section )

  • From a virtual DVD drive served over the network by the InfoServer utility (Section )

  • From an image on a PC or Windows server in the network accessed through the HP SIM interface (Section )

  • From an image on a PC or Windows server in the network using virtual media (vMedia) through a browser connected to your Integrity server iLO 2 MP port (Section )

The latter two options can be used for entry-class Integrity servers that support such means (note that you can use these options when a local DVD drive is not available on your Integrity server). For more information about booting operations, see Section .

Before you can boot your OpenVMS DVD, make sure your console is configured correctly. You can use a VGA graphics device, serial device, or network interface for the console. For information about configuring your system console, see Section .

Note:

When using a VGA console and installing from vMedia or a USB DVD drive with the keyboard plugged into a USB hub, the keyboard might not be operational. If so, simply unplug the hub and plug it back in.

HP recommends that you load and use the most current system firmware. For more information about system firmware, see Section  and the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes. For information about other required and optional tasks to be performed before or after booting the system, see Appendix B.

Caution:

To boot your OpenVMS I64 operating system on a cell-based server (Superdome servers, or midrange servers such as rx8620 and rx7620), note the following:

  • The ACPI configuration must be set correctly. For more information, see Section .

  • The nPartition on which OpenVMS I64 is booted must have all memory configured as interleaved memory (memory that can be mapped across more than one cell). For more information about cell memory and general notes on nPartition booting, see Section  and see your hardware documentation.

Booting from the Local Drive

Boot the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD from a local DVD drive by performing the steps included in this section. To boot the DVD on a cell-based server, a DVD device must be accessible by the nPartition on which OpenVMS is being installed.

  1. Make sure your Integrity server is powered on. If your system has an attached external device, make sure it is turned on and operational.

  2. Insert the DVD into the drive.

  3. Cycle power.

  4. From the main EFI boot menu (for cell-based servers, this must be the EFI boot menu for the nPartition on which OpenVMS is to be booted), select the appropriate item from the boot options list. Note that the EFI boot menu is timed; press any key to stop the countdown timer.

    For some systems, the boot option to select is the Internal Bootable DVD option. If that option is not listed in your EFI boot menu, move to the Boot From a File menu and select the Removable Media Boot option, if present.

    Alternatively (and this method is recommended for cell-based servers), boot the DVD drive from the EFI Shell prompt by entering the command shown in the following example, where fsn: corresponds to the Integrity server DVD drive (such as fs0:). Note that if you have navigated to a particular file system, the EFI Shell prompt reflects that file system; for example, if the current file system is fs0:, the EFI Shell prompt is fs0:>.

    Shell> fsn:\efi\boot\bootia64.efi

    To determine which device is the bootable DVD drive, examine the list of mapped devices and look for an fs device listing that includes the letters “CDROM”, as in the following line. In this line, fsn is the file system associated with the drive, which is usually fs0: (instead of "fsn", you might see something similar to "V8.3-1H1"; instead of Ata, you might see Scsi, depending on the server model):

    fsn : Acpi(HWP0002,400)/Pci(4|1)/Ata(Primary,Master)/CDROM(Entry0)

    You can use the following command to display the mapping of various EFI device names to OpenVMS device names, where fsn is the device you want to check (such as fs0:):

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_show dev -fs

    On most Integrity servers, the DVD drive is DQA0: (IDE) or DNA0: (USB). On systems that include a SCSI bus, such as the Superdome server, the DVD drive is DKA0:. For more information about the vms_show command, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual.

    Note:

    By default, certain versions of EFI might interpret the Delete (or Backspace) key differently than do OpenVMS Alpha systems or Microsoft Windows computers. In such cases, press Ctrl/H to delete the last character entered. For more information, see Section .

When the DVD boots properly, the OpenVMS operating system banner is displayed, followed by the operating system menu. You can now install your OpenVMS I64 operating system onto the target disk; see Section . If the methods documented in this section do not succeed in booting the DVD, see Section .

Note:

When booting OpenVMS from the installation DVD for the first time on any OpenVMS I64 system with a SAN storage device, you might experience a delay in EFI initialization because the entire SAN is scanned. Depending on the size of the SAN, this delay might range from several seconds to several minutes.

Booting Over the Network Using the InfoServer utility

To use the InfoServer utility to boot from the network, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only); see Appendix C. The instructions on booting over the network from a virtual DVD are also included in Appendix C.

Booting Using HP SIM Provisioning

To use HP SIM provisioning to boot an image of the OpenVMS OE DVD, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only). For these steps and the booting instructions, see Appendix D.

Booting Using vMedia

To use vMedia to boot an image of the OpenVMS OE DVD, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only); see Section . For instructions on booting with vMedia, see Section .

Installing the OpenVMS Operating System onto a System Disk

After booting the operating system media, you can create an operating system disk by using option 1 of the menu provided by the operating system media. The procedure for installing an OpenVMS I64 system is similar to that for installing OpenVMS Alpha operating systems. Exceptions are summarized in Section  and are noted in the installation instructions in Section .

Differences Between OpenVMS I64 and Alpha Installations

If you are unfamiliar with OpenVMS Alpha installations, skip to the next section.If you have not installed an OpenVMS I64 system before and are familiar with OpenVMS Alpha installations, the main differences between installations of these two systems onto a system disk include the following:

  • Output from the installation procedure is nearly identical for both Alpha and I64 except, of course, the operating system names as well as names of products included with the installation. For example, the OpenVMS I64 windowing and networking product names are all displayed as HP I64VMS product-name, such as HP I64VMS KERBEROS, while OpenVMS Alpha product names are displayed in any of three different ways, depending on the product and version:

    • HP product-name, such as HP AXPVMS KERBEROS

    • DEC product-name, such as DEC AXPVMS DWMOTIF

    • CPQ product-name, such as CPQ AXPVMS CDSA

  • The default target system disk and volume labels are unique for each system.

  • The OpenVMS I64 procedure does not ask whether your system will be an instance in an OpenVMS Galaxy; OpenVMS I64 does not support OpenVMS Galaxy.

  • The OpenVMS Alpha operating system includes several components that are not included with the OpenVMS I64, such as C Object Libraries and software support for translating images.

  • When installing OpenVMS I64 onto the system disk the first time, you are advised to set up the system with a boot option for the system disk (and to set it as the default boot device); you can allow the installation procedure to assist you in setting up and validating a boot entry. Whereas on Alpha systems you can configure boot devices only by shutting down the system and entering commands at the console, on I64 systems you can configure boot devices either before you shut down the system (using the installation procedure or, once OpenVMS is running, using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility) or after you shut down the system (using EFI Utilities for OpenVMS or EFI itself).

  • For OpenVMS I64, when you install the operating system by booting from the distribution media, the PCSI utility uses the Secure Delivery component of CDSA to validate kits that were signed. For OpenVMS Alpha, such validation is not performed when installing the operating system from the distribution media (CD). (Because of limitations of the OpenVMS Alpha CD boot environment, CDSA is not present on the distribution CD in usable form.) On both OpenVMS Alpha and I64 systems, signed PCSI kits that you install subsequently (including signed kits on the distribution media) are validated. In addition, on both OpenVMS Alpha and OpenVMS I64 systems, the DCL command PRODUCT SHOW HISTORY displays the validation status of installed products and identifies those that were installed from unsigned kits or wwere installed prior to the availability of the Secure Delivery functionality.

Responding to Prompts During the Installation

At different points during the installation, you must respond to prompts that ask you to supply specific information. This manual and the help text available during the installation procedure tell you how to obtain most of this information and how to make decisions when responding to specific prompts.

To repeat an explanation provided by the installation procedure, type a question mark (?) at the prompt. To change or correct a response made to an earlier question, enter the caret (^) character as many times as needed. Note that entering this character might take you back more than one question. To return to the main menu, press Ctrl/Y, which aborts the installation.

HP recommends that you review the following summary before you begin the installation so that you understand beforehand the types of information you need to provide.

During the installation, the procedure prompts you for the following information:

  • The names of the source drive, target drive, and LAN device (if booting is served by an InfoServer).

  • Whether you want to select the INITIALIZE or PRESERVE option (as described in Section ).

  • A volume label for the target disk (if you choose not to use the default volume label).

  • A password for the SYSTEM account.

  • Whether you want to form or join an OpenVMS Cluster system and, if so, what kind (as described in Section ).

  • DECnet node name and address (or values for the system parameters, SCSNODE and SCSSYSTEMID).

    Note:

    If you install the DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS software, but you want to use addresses compatible with DECnet Phase IV software, you still need to provide this information. These settings identify your system by name and number in a DECnet or cluster environment. Note that if you supply a DECnet Phase IV address, the procedure automatically calculates the SCSSYSTEMID value. If necessary, consult the network or system manager to obtain this information.

  • Information listed on Product Authorization Keys (PAKs) for your OpenVMS licenses. To register your licenses, you must enter the information listed on the PAK for each license. You may register your licenses after installing OpenVMS.

  • Optional operating system components that you want to install. You can install all components (by default), or you can select specific components from this list:

    • DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS (a graphical user interface)

      If you install this product, you must also include the DECwindows Server Support component. If you are not installing DECwindows as part of the OpenVMS installation now, but you plan to install it later, install the DECwindows Server Support component now.

    • OpenVMS Management Station

      If you need to create a kit to install the PC component of the OpenVMS Management Station software, then you must include the OpenVMS Management Station Software PC files component.

    • TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS

    • Either DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS or DECnet Phase IV for OpenVMS (but not both)

      If you install either DECnet implementation, you must also include the Support for DECnet component. If you are not installing DECnet-Plus or DECnet Phase IV now, but you plan to install one of them later, you should install the Support for the DECnet-Plus or DECnet Phase IV component now. (The same support component applies to both implementations of DECnet.)

    For a list of component options included with the OpenVMS operating system, see Example 3.1.

Installing OpenVMS Using Option 1 of the Operating System Menu

After booting the OpenVMS operating system media, install the OpenVMS operating system by following these steps:

  1. Select Option 1 on the Menu: When you boot the OpenVMS operating system CD or DVD (as instructed in Section ), the initial HP copyright message and other messages are displayed, followed by the operating system main menu that is shown in the following example. Choose option 1 to install the operating system, as shown. Note that after the initial copyright message, a few minutes might pass before the OpenVMS operating system menu appears.

    
        .
        .
      Installing required known files...
    
      Configuring devices...
    
      ****************************************************************
    
      You can install or upgrade the OpenVMS I64 operating system
      or you can install or upgrade layered products that are included
      on the OpenVMS I64 distribution media (CD/DVD).
        
      You can also execute DCL commands and procedures to perform
      "standalone" tasks, such as backing up the system disk.
        
      Please choose one of the following:
    
        1)  Upgrade, install or reconfigure OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1
        2)  Display layered products that this procedure can install
        3)  Install or upgrade layered products
        4)  Show installed products
        5)  Reconfigure installed products
        6)  Remove installed products
        7)  Find, Install or Undo patches; Show or Delete recovery data
        8)  Execute DCL commands and procedures
        9)  Shut down this system      
    
    Enter CHOICE or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9?) 1

    The OpenVMS operating system kit might contain patch kits. If it does, information similar to the following is displayed:

        The following PATCH kits are present on the OpenVMS I64
        distribution media.
    
        ----------------------------------- ----------- ----------
        PRODUCT                             KIT TYPE    KIT FORMAT
        ----------------------------------- ----------- ----------
        DEC I64VMS TCPIP_ECO V5.n-nnn       Patch       Compressed
        ----------------------------------- ----------- ----------
    
        1 item found
    
        Please consult the OpenVMS I64 Upgrade and Installation Manual,
        the Release Notes, and the Cover Letter to determine if any or
        all of these patches may be required for your system.

    If you have not already done so, determine whether you need to install any patches.

    The initial display from the procedure also includes information about how to respond to prompts (as described in Section ):

        ***********************************************************
        This procedure will ask a series of questions.
    
              () - encloses acceptable answers
              [] - encloses default answers
    
        Type your response and press the <Return>key.  Type:
    
              ? - to repeat an explanation
              ^ - to change prior input (not always possible)
              Ctrl/Y - to exit the installation procedure
  2. Create the System Disk: The procedure allows you to begin creating the system disk. First it displays the following information, followed by the prompt asking whether you want to initialize or preserve the disk:

        There are two choices for Installation/Upgrade:
    
        INITIALIZE - Removes all software and data files that were
            previously on the target disk and installs OpenVMS I64.
    
        PRESERVE -- Installs or upgrades OpenVMS I64 on the target disk
            and retains all other contents of the target disk.
    
       * NOTE: You cannot use preserve to install OpenVMS I64 on a disk on
             which any other operating system is installed. This includes
             implementations of OpenVMS for other architectures.
    
    Do you want to INITIALIZE or to PRESERVE? [PRESERVE] INITIALIZE

    Respond to the INITIALIZE or PRESERVE prompt as follows:

    IF ... THEN ...

    Your disk is new

    Type INITIALIZE and press Enter.

    You want to remove all files from an existing system disk

    Type INITIALIZE and press Enter.

    You want to retain OpenVMS files on an existing disk

    Press Enter to accept the default (PRESERVE); go to Chapter 6.

    Note:

    You cannot install OpenVMS on a disk where another operating system is installed. For example, you cannot take a UNIX disk, select the PRESERVE option, and then install OpenVMS on the disk. The UNIX disk is not structured in the format that OpenVMS requires.

    During initialization of an OpenVMS I64 target system disk, the installation process creates a diagnostic partition, visible only at the console prompt. For more information about this partition and the options you can take, see Appendix J.

  3. Specify the System Disk (Target Disk): The procedure next asks you for the name of the target disk. If you do not know the name of the disk, enter a question mark (?). The procedure displays a list of devices on your system. Select the appropriate disk and respond to the prompt. For example:

      You must enter the device name for the target disk on which
      OpenVMS I64 will be installed.
    
    Enter device name for target disk: (? for choices)  DKB400

    If this is the first installation on this system, no default device is indicated, as in this example. A default device name is listed if this is not the first installation (for example, [DKB400] or, for a Fibre Channel disk device, [$1$DGA567]).

    If you select a device that is not available or that cannot be used for some other reason, the procedure displays information indicating why the device cannot be used. For example, if you enter MKA500, a tape device, a message similar to the following is displayed:

       MKA500 is not a disk device
  4. Specify the Volume Label: If you select a device that can be used, the procedure then informs you of the volume label currently assigned to this device and asks whether you want to keep that label. If you choose not to keep that label, you are prompted for a new label, as shown in the following example. The OpenVMS operating system uses the volume label to identify and reference the disk. Make sure the label you use is unique; problems occur if the same label is used by different disk volumes.

       DKB400: is now labeled V82_nnn.
    Do you want to keep this label? (Yes/No) [Yes] NO
    
    Enter volume label for target system disk: [I64SYS]  I640831

    You can keep the label already assigned to the disk, accept the default label assigned by the system (for I64 systems, I64SYS), or specify a different volume label (with a limit of 12 characters that can include A to Z, 0 through 9, the dollar sign ($), hyphen (-), and underscore (_) characters).

    Note:

    OpenVMS requires that the volume labels for all disks on your system or OpenVMS Cluster have unique labels. If a disk having the same label as the system disk is mounted, various OpenVMS components do not function as intended or a node might crash during boot.

  5. Specify On-Disk Structure Level: After you enter the volume label for the target system disk, when you selected INITIALIZE, you are asked whether you want to initialize the target system disk with On-Disk Structure Level 2 (ODS-2) or Level 5 (ODS-5). The second paragraph in the following example appears during installations of OpenVMS I64 only.

        The target system disk can be initialized with On-Disk Structure
        Level 2 (ODS-2) or Level 5 (ODS-5). (? for more information)
    
        OpenVMS I64 systems include WBEM Services for OpenVMS; the WBEM data
        repository requires an ODS-5 disk.  If you choose to initialize the
        target system disk with ODS-5 the repository can be on the system
        disk; otherwise you will need to provide an additional ODS-5 disk. 
        (? for more information.
    
    Do you want to initialize with ODS-2 or ODS-5? (2/5/?) 

    For details about ODS-2 and ODS-5 file systems, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials. A brief summary follows.

    Note:

    HP recommends that your system disk be initialized in ODS-5 format, unless you plan to use software that requires ODS-2.

    Note also that although WBEM Services for OpenVMS can be installed on an ODS-2 disk, the WBEM Services for OpenVMS data repository requires an ODS-5 disk. A system disk in ODS-5 format can store everything; if you choose to have your disk in ODS-2 format, the procedure asks you to provide an ODS-5 disk for the data repository.

    • ODS-2

      ODS-2 allows for compatibility with OpenVMS VAX and Alpha systems that use ODS-2 disks (as well as OpenVMS I64 systems using ODS-2 disks). Choose ODS-2 if you do not need the new features of ODS-5 disks, including the support of applications ported from other operating systems (such as UNIX, Linux, and MS Windows).

    • ODS-5

      • ODS-5 supports file names that are longer, have a wider range of legal characters, and allow for mixed-case file names. This feature permits use of file names similar to those in a Microsoft Windows or UNIX environment.

      • ODS-5 supports hard links to files, access dates, and files whose names differ only by case.

      • ODS-5 volumes cannot be mounted on any version of OpenVMS prior to Version 7.2.

      • Systems running OpenVMS VAX Version 7.2 and higher can mount ODS-5 volumes, but cannot create or access files having extended names. (Lowercase file names are seen in uppercase on OpenVMS VAX systems.)

    Select ODS-2 or ODS-5 by entering 2 or 5 at the prompt.

  6. Enable Hard Links (ODS-5 Only): If you selected ODS-5, the procedure asks whether you want to enable hard links (if you selected ODS-2, skip to the next step). When you install OpenVMS I64, the procedure advises you that WBEM Services for OpenVMS does not require hard links, as shown in the following example. Enter YES or NO to indicate your choice.

       Hard links can be enabled on ODS-5 disks. WBEM Services for OpenVMS
                     does not require hard links. (? for more information)
    
    Do you want to enable hard links? (Yes/No/?) YES

    Both ODS-2 and ODS-5 support aliases, which are additional names for a file or directory. Only ODS-5 supports hard links. One of the main differences with hard links enabled is the way the DCL DELETE command works. With hard links enabled, if you enter the DELETE command to delete a file that has one or more aliases associated with it, the command only deletes the alias by which the file is being accessed. The actual file continues to exist and is accessible by any remaining alias. The file is deleted only when the last remaining alias is deleted. Without hard links enabled, the DELETE command deletes both the alias by which the file is being accessed and the file itself. Any other aliases remain but the file is no longer accessible because it is no longer present. Thus, the remaining aliases are unusable. If enabling hard links has any drawbacks, they are minor and probably of concern only in rare circumstances. For example, if disk quotas are in effect, though owners of a file can delete any links to a file in a directory they can access, hard links in other users’ directories might cause a file to be retained, and the file size continues to be charged against that owner’s disk quota.

    In general, be aware that enabling hard links does change the file system’s behavior and that applications and management practices should respond accordingly (instead of being alias-specific, for example).

    For more information about hard links, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

  7. Confirm Target System Disk Choices: The procedure displays your target system disk choices and asks you to confirm that they are correct. In the following example, the choices made were to initialize the disk with ODS-5 and with hard links. The volume label is I640831H1.

        You have chosen to install OpenVMS I64 on a new disk.
    
        The target system disk, DKB400:, will be initialized
        with structure level 5 (ODS-5).
        Hard links WILL be enabled.
        It will be labeled I640831H1.
        Any data currently on the target system disk will be lost.
    
    Is this OK? (Yes/No) YES
    
        Initializing and mounting target....
    %EFI-I-VOLINIT, FAT volume DIAGNOSTICS has been initialized
    
        Creating page and swap files....
  8. Configure and Validate Boot Options (I64 Only): On OpenVMS I64 installations, the procedure next asks whether you want to create or validate boot options.

       Boot options in the EFI Boot Manager boot option menu can provide a
       convenient way to boot your system.  The installation  procedure can
       automatically create a new boot option (if none exists) or validate
       existing boot options.
    
    Do you want to create or validate boot options? (Yes/No) [Yes] YES

    If your newly installed system disk will normally be booted on this system and this device, and if you want the installation procedure to assist you in setting up or validating boot options on the EFI console in the EFI Boot Manager menu, answer YES. The installation procedure creates and validates a new boot option if one does not exist, or validates existing boot options, just before the installation completes (see step 21).

    When you answer YES and no boot option exists, the procedure allows you to set OpenVMS boot flags (VMS_FLAGS), as shown in the following example. Enter the OpenVMS flags (for example, 0,1), or press Enter to set no flags (the default). If a boot option exists, you can change boot flags after the installation completes (for information about changing boot flags, see Section ).

       You can set VMS_FLAGS or accept the default, 0,0.
    
    Enter the value for VMS_FLAGS: (n.n) [0,0]

    If you do not want the installation procedure to assist you in setting up or validating boot options on the EFI console, answer NO.

    HP recommends that you allow the installation procedure to assist you in setting up and validating boot options.

    Note:

    If your newly installed system disk is a Fibre Channel device, HP recommends that you add it as a boot option in the EFI boot menu. If you do not allow the installation procedure to add the device to the boot menu, you can add it by using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM) after the installation completes. (To add Fibre Channel devices to the EFI boot menu, use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility instead of EFI.)

    HP recommends using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility to add shadowed system disks in a multiple-member shadow set to the EFI boot device list and dump device list. Be sure to add all members to both lists.

    For information about the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility, see Section . For more information about configuring and booting Fibre Channel devices, see Appendix E.

  9. Specify SYSTEM Account Information (Initialized Disks Only): If you are initializing the target disk, you are prompted for SYSTEM account information. Before you respond to the prompt asking you to enter a password for the SYSTEM account, note the following:

    • Passwords must be at least 8 characters in length (but must not exceed 31 characters). Valid characters for the password include A through Z, 0 through 9, the dollar sign ($), and underscore (_). Passwords must contain at least one alphabetic character (A through Z). The system converts all characters to uppercase, so the case of characters you enter does not matter.

    • Press Enter after you enter the password. (The password does not display as you type it.)

    • After you enter the password, the procedure checks to make sure it meets the requirements for a valid password.

    • Reenter the password for verification.

    The following is a sample display:

        You must enter a password for the SYSTEM account.
    
        The password must be a minimum of 8 characters in length, and
        may not exceed 31 characters.  It will be checked and verified.
        The system will not accept passwords that can be guessed easily.
    
        The password will not be displayed as you enter it.
    
    Password for SYSTEM account: 
    
    Re-enter SYSTEM password for verification:

    If you reenter the password incorrectly or if the procedure determines that the password is too easy for another user to guess, the procedure displays an error message and allows you to specify a valid password.

  10. Declare OpenVMS Cluster Membership: The procedure now asks whether your system will be part of an OpenVMS Cluster. The display is similar to the following:

    Will this system be a member of an OpenVMS Cluster? (Yes/No)  

    You should answer YES if the system will be a member of an OpenVMS Cluster. Answering YES to this question causes SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG.COM to run automatically when your newly installed system is first booted. The CLUSTER_CONFIG procedure asks a series of questions about the cluster. Your response to this question determines how the VAXCLUSTER system parameter is set. (The VAXCLUSTER system parameter is set for OpenVMS I64 systems as well as Alpha and VAX systems; it is not specific to OpenVMS VAX systems.) For more information, see the Guidelines for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations manual.

    If you answer YES to the cluster question, the display is similar to the following:

        When your new system is first booted you will be required to answer
        additional questions in order to configure the OpenVMS Cluster.

    If you answer NO to the cluster question, the system can still be a member of an OpenVMS Cluster. However, in this case you must explicitly configure the node into the cluster after the installation is completed. For more information, see Section .

    For more information about cluster configuration, see the HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manual.

  11. Declaring System as OpenVMS Galaxy Instance (Alpha only): The procedure next asks whether your system will be an instance in an OpenVMS Galaxy. (This question is asked in OpenVMS Alpha installations only. OpenVMS I64 does not support OpenVMS Galaxy.) The display is similar to the following:

    Will this system be an instance in an OpenVMS Galaxy? (Yes/No)

    Your answer to this question determines how the GALAXY system parameter is set.

  12. Set SCSNODE System Parameter: The procedure now asks you to specify a value for the first of two system parameters, the SCSNODE parameter. (Step 13 describes the output and prompts for the second system parameter, SCSSYSTEMID.) SCSNODE is a name that can be from one to six letters or numbers; it must include at least one letter. If this system is part of an OpenVMS Cluster, SCSNODE must be unique within the cluster. If you are using DECnet Phase IV for OpenVMS or DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS with DECnet Phase IV addresses, then SCSNODE must be the same as your DECnet node name.

    The following is an example of the display and a valid response:

        For your system to operate properly, you must set two parameters:
         SCSNODE and SCSSYSTEMID.
       
         SCSNODE can be from 1 to 6 letters or numbers. It must contain at
         least one letter.
    
         If you plan to use DECnet, SCSNODE must be the DECnet Phase IV
         node name, or the DECnet-Plus (Phase V) node synonym.
    
         If you have multiple OpenVMS systems, the SCSNODE on each system 
         must be unique.
    
    Enter SCSNODE:  I64CSI
  13. Declare Use of DECnet; Setting SCSSYSTEMID System Parameter: The next prompt asks whether you plan to use DECnet. It also informs you that the SCSYSYSTEMID system parameter is based on the DECnet Phase IV address. SCSSYSTEMID must also be unique within an OpenVMS Cluster.

        If you plan to use DECnet, SCSSYSTEMID must be set based on the
        DECnet Phase IV address.
    
    Do you plan to use DECnet (Yes/No) [YES]:  YES

    If you answer YES, the information about the DECnet Phase IV addresses is displayed along with a prompt for a DECnet Phase IV address. Enter a valid DECnet Phase IV address, as in the following example:

        DECnet Phase IV addresses are in the format
    
           DECnet_area_number.DECnet_node_number
    
        DECnet_area_number is a number between 1 and 63.
        DECnet_node_number is a number between 1 and 1023.
    
        If you plan to use DECnet WITHOUT Phase IV compatible addresses, 
        enter 0.0.
    
    
    Enter DECnet (Phase IV) Address [1.1]:  63.180

    A display such as the following informs you of the value assigned to SCSSYSTEMID:

      SCSSYSTEMID will be set to 64692.
    
         This was calculated as follows:
    
         (DECnet_area_number * 1024) + DECnet_node_number

    If you are not using DECnet, or if you enter 0.0 as the DECnet Phase IV address, you are prompted to enter a SCSSSYSTEMID in the range of 1 to 65535. If this is a standalone system, the default of 65534 is acceptable. However, if this system is part of an OpenVMS Cluster, you must enter a SCSSYSTEMID that is unique within the cluster. The following is a sample display:

        The system cannot calculate SCSSYSTEMID from an address that is not
        compatible with DECnet Phase-IV.
        You will have to choose a value for SCSSYSTEMID.
         
        If you plan to use LAT software, you may have to add /NODECNET to any
        CREATE LINK commands in SYS$MANAGER:LATSYSTARTUP.COM.
    
        Please choose a SCSSYSTEMID between 1 and 65535. If you have multiple
        OpenVMS systems, the SCSSYSTEMID on each system must be unique.
    
    Enter SCSYSTEMID [65535]:  12345
  14. Set Local Time Zone: Now the procedure asks you to configure the local time zone. For local time zone support to work correctly, the installation procedure must set the time zone that accurately describes the location you want to be your default time zone. Usually, this is the time zone in which your system is running. In addition, the procedure asks you to set the OpenVMS time differential factor (TDF).

    The procedure displays the main time zone menu. You can select the time zone in either of two ways:

    • Select the number in the main time zone menu that best represents the time zone desired. (If multiple time zones exist for the selection you make, you must select the exact time zone from another menu.)

    • Use a search option that allows you to bypass the time zone menu and search by name (partial or full).

    If you select one of the numbers in the time zone menu, the corresponding time zone is selected. At any prompt, you can enter a question mark (?) for help information.

    Note:

    An asterisk (*) next to a number indicates that more than one time zone exists for that selection. If you select such a number, an additional menu displays choices that allow you to select the appropriate time zone. For example, if you choose the United States (US) time zone from the main time zone menu, a second menu displays the specific time zones within the United States.

    The following example shows how you would select the Eastern time zone for the United States by using the menu number:

      Configuring the Local Time Zone
    
    TIME ZONE SPECIFICATION -- MAIN Time Zone Menu      "*" indicates a menu
    
      0* GMT
      1* AFRICA          17) EST             33) IRAN            49) PORTUGAL
      2* AMERICA         18) EST5EDT         34) ISRAEL          50) PRC
      3* ANTARCTICA      19* ETC             35) JAMAICA         51) PST8PDT
      4* ARCTIC          20* EUROPE          36) JAPAN           52) ROC
      5* ASIA            21) FACTORY         37) KWAJALEIN       53) ROK
      6* ATLANTIC        22) GB-EIRE         38) LIBYA           54) SINGAPORE
      7* AUSTRALIA       23) GB              39) MET             55) TURKEY
      8* BRAZIL          24) GMT-0           40* MEXICO          56) UCT
      9* CANADA          25) GMT             41* MIDEAST         57) UNIVERSAL
     10) CET             26) GMT0            42) MST             58* US
     11* CHILE           27) GMTPLUS0        43) MST7MDT         59) UTC
     12) CST6CDT         28) GREENWICH       44) NAVAJO          60) W-SU
     13) CUBA            29) HONGKONG        45) NZ-CHAT         61) WET
     14) EET             30) HST             46) NZ              62) ZULU
     15) EGYPT           31) ICELAND         47* PACIFIC        
     16) EIRE            32* INDIAN          48) POLAND         
    
    Press "Return" to redisplay, enter "=" to search or "?" for help, or
    Select the number above that best represents the desired time zone: 58
    
    US Time Zone Menu                            "*" indicates a menu
    
      0* RETURN TO MAIN TIME ZONE MENU
      1) ALASKA           5) EAST-INDIANA     9) MICHIGAN        13) SAMOA
      2) ALEUTIAN         6) EASTERN         10) MOUNTAIN       
      3) ARIZONA          7) HAWAII          11) PACIFIC-NEW    
      4) CENTRAL          8) INDIANA-STARKE  12) PACIFIC        
    
    Press "Return" to redisplay, enter "=" to search or "?" for help, or
    Select the number above that best represents the desired time zone: 6
    
    You selected US /EASTERN as your time zone.
    Is this correct? (Yes/No) [YES]:

    To use the search option instead of menu numbers to select the time zone, enter an equals sign (=) at the menu prompt instead of a number. You can enter one or more words or partial words immediately after the equals string, or you can enter the equals sign alone, in which case the procedure prompts you for the words or partial words of the time zone you want to select. After you enter that information, the procedure displays all matching time zones, and you can then select the appropriate one.

    The following example shows how you would select the Eastern time zone for the United States by using the search option:

      Configuring the Local Time Zone
    
    TIME ZONE SPECIFICATION -- MAIN Time Zone Menu       "*" indicates a menu
    
      0* GMT
      1* AFRICA          17) EST             33) IRAN            49) PORTUGAL
      2* AMERICA         18) EST5EDT         34) ISRAEL          50) PRC     
      3* ANTARCTICA      19* ETC             35) JAMAICA         51) PST8PDT 
      4* ARCTIC          20* EUROPE          36) JAPAN           52) ROC     
      5* ASIA            21) FACTORY         37) KWAJALEIN       53) ROK     
      6* ATLANTIC        22) GB-EIRE         38) LIBYA           54) SINGAPORE
      7* AUSTRALIA       23) GB              39) MET             55) TURKEY  
      8* BRAZIL          24) GMT-0           40* MEXICO          56) UCT     
      9* CANADA          25) GMT             41* MIDEAST         57) UNIVERSAL
     10) CET             26) GMT0            42) MST             58* US      
     11* CHILE           27) GMTPLUS0        43) MST7MDT         59) UTC     
     12) CST6CDT         28) GREENWICH       44) NAVAJO          60) W-SU    
     13) CUBA            29) HONGKONG        45) NZ-CHAT         61) WET     
     14) EET             30) HST             46) NZ              62) ZULU    
     15) EGYPT           31) ICELAND         47* PACIFIC             
     16) EIRE            32* INDIAN          48) POLAND         
    
    Press "Return" to redisplay, enter "=" to search or "?" for help, or
    Select the number above that best represents the desired time zone: =EAST
    
    Search for Time Zone by Full or Partial Name
        "*" indicates a menu
    
        1) BRAZIL / EAST
        2) CANADA / EAST-SASKATCHEWAN
        3) CANADA / EASTERN
        4) CHILE / EASTERISLAND
        5) MIDEAST / RIYADH87
        6) MIDEAST / RIYADH88
        7) MIDEAST / RIYADH89
        8) PACIFIC / EASTER
        9) US / EAST-INDIANA
       10) US / EASTERN
    
    Press "Return" to redisplay this menu,
    enter "=" to search for a new zone,
    enter "0" to return to the Main Time Zone Menu, enter "?" for help, or
    Select the number above that best represents the desired time zone: 10
    
    You selected US / EASTERN as your time zone.
    Is this correct? (Yes/No) [YES]: 

    The procedure then prompts you for the TDF.

    For more information about local time zone support, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

  15. Set Time Differential Factor (TDF): The procedure now provides information about and prompts you to enter the time differential factor (TDF). The TDF is the difference between your system time and Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), which is an international standard (similar to Greenwich Mean Time) for measuring time of day. The procedure supplies a default for TDF, which is generally the correct response. If the time zone you selected supports daylight saving time, the procedure asks you whether daylight saving time is currently in effect. The following example shows TDF information and prompts displayed by the procedure:

       Configuring the Time Differential Factor (TDF)
    
    
       Default Time Differential Factor for standard time is -5:00.
       Default Time Differential Factor for daylight saving time is -4:00.
    
    
       The Time Differential Factor (TDF) is the difference between your
       system time and Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).  UTC is similar
       in most respects to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).
    
       The TDF is expressed as hours and minutes, and should be entered
       in the hh:mm format.  TDFs for the Americas will be negative
       (-3:00, -4:00, etc.); TDFs for Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia
       will be positive (1:00, 2:00, etc.).
    
    This time zone supports daylight saving time.
    Is this time zone currently on daylight saving time? (Yes/No): YES
    
    Enter the Time Differential Factor [-4:00]:
    
       NEW SYSTEM TIME DIFFERENTIAL FACTOR = -4:00
    
    Is this correct? [Y]:

    For more information about TDF support, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials. Once OpenVMS has been installed and booted from the system disk, you can determine whether your system is set for daylight saving time by using the following DCL command to display the translation for the daylight saving time logical:

    $  SHOW LOGICAL *TIMEZONE*
    "SYS$TIMEZONE_DAYLIGHT_SAVING"="1"
            .
            .
            .
  16. Register Licenses (Optional at this time): After setting the TDF, the procedure asks whether you want to register any Product Authorization Keys (PAKs), as in the following display:

       If you have Product Authorization Keys (PAKs) to register,
       you can register them now.
    
    Do you want to register any Product Authorization Keys? (Yes/No) [Yes]

    You can register the PAKs now by responding YES to the prompt, or later by responding NO. You register licenses later by following the directions in Section .

    To register your licenses now, be sure you have the following before proceeding:

    • A copy of the Product Authorization Key (PAK) for each license that you are registering.

    • The HP OpenVMS License Management Utility Manual, which contains complete, detailed information about the licensing procedure.

    For the OpenVMS I64 operating system, a single Operating Environment (OE) license grants the right to use all the components bundled in the purchased OE. Each OE is offered with Per Core Licenses (PCLs). One PCL is required for each active processor core in the system or hard partition. (If additional processor cores are added later to the system or hard partition, each requires an additional PCL.) The License Management utility supports these OpenVMS I64 licensing practices. The OpenVMS Unlimited User License is included with the Foundation Operating Environment (FOE) and, therefore, is included with the other OEs available. For more information, see the HP Operating Environments for OpenVMS for Integrity Servers Software Product Description (SPD 82.34.xx).

    The OpenVMS Alpha operating system uses one or more of several types of licenses, as described in the HP OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and HP OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 Software Product Description (SPD 82.35.xx) .

    For more information about licensing terms and policies, contact your local HP sales office, or see the HP software licensing information at the following location:

    http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/software/info/terms/swl_sld.html

    When you answer YES to the prompt to register your licenses now, the installation procedure launches the SYS$UPDATE:VMSLICENSE.COM procedure, which displays the following options menu:

       VMS License Management Utility Options:
         
           1. REGISTER a Product Authorization Key
           2. AMEND an existing Product Authorization Key
           3. CANCEL an existing Product Authorization Key
           4. LIST Product Authorization Keys
           5. MODIFY an existing Product Authorization Key
           6. DISABLE an existing Product Authorization Key
           7. DELETE an existing Product Authorization Key
           8. COPY an existing Product Authorization Key
           9. MOVE an existing Product Authorization Key
          10. ENABLE an existing Product Authorization Key
          11. SHOW the licenses loaded on this node
          12. SHOW the unit requirements for this node
                
          99. Exit this procedure
    
          Type '?' at any prompt for a description of the information 
          requested. Press Ctrl/Z at any prompt to return to this menu.
         
    Enter one of the above choices [1]

    Select the REGISTER option and enter each license key until you have successfully registered all required PAKs. After you register all your licenses, exit the License Management procedure by entering 99 at the prompt.

  17. Install Windowing, Networking, and Related Products: The procedure now asks whether you want to install the optional DECwindows GUI (DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS) and networking software (DECnet and TCP/IP) included with OpenVMS. The software that you choose to install (including the required software) is installed along with the OpenVMS operating system. You can change the default values for these products later in the installation procedure.

    Note:

    The following display shows what you might see during an OpenVMS I64 installation. Some of the products listed are supported on OpenVMS I64 systems only.

      The following products are part of the OpenVMS installation;
      they will be installed along with the OpenVMS operating sytem:
     
         o Availability Manager (base) for OpenVMS I64
         o CDSA for OpenVMS I64
         o KERBEROS for OpenVMS I64
         o SSL for OpenVMS I64
         o Performance Data Collector (base) for OpenVMS I64
         o WBEM Services for OpenVMS (WBEMCIM)
         o WBEM Providers for OpenVMS (WBEMPROVIDERS)
    
      You can also install the following optional products along with the
      OpenVMS operating system:
    
         o DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS I64
         o DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS I64
         o DECnet Phase IV for OpenVMS I64
         o HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS
    
      If you want to change your selections, you can do so later in the
      installation by answering "NO" to the following question:
                                    
          "Do you want the defaults for all options?"    
    
      Do you want to install DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS I64 V1.6? (Yes/No) [Yes]  Y

    If you want to install the OpenVMS graphical user interface and you have the hardware that supports it and the license to use it, answer YES; otherwise, answer NO.

    You may install any of the optional software products separately after the OpenVMS installation completes.

    Note:

    Beginning with OpenVMS Version 8.3, DECwindows client files are made available through the DWMOTIF_SUPPORT kit. (Prior to Version 8.3, the client files were included directly with the OpenVMS operating system kit.) The OpenVMS installation procedure installs this kit automatically. The DWMOTIF_SUPPORT kit name is listed during the installation.

    The OpenVMS installation menu offers the choice to install DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS or DECnet Phase IV for OpenVMS networking software. You cannot have both installed on your system at the same time. You can also choose to install neither DECnet product; however, certain products that depend on DECnet might be adversely affected.

    If you have installed DECnet-Plus and TCP/IP on your system, you can run DECnet applications over your TCP/IP network. For more information about DECnet over TCP/IP, see the DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS Network Management manual.

    The software products display is similar to the following:

    Beginning with OpenVMS V7.1, the DECnet-Plus kit is provided with 
    the OpenVMS operating system kit.  HP strongly recommends that 
    DECnet users install DECnet-Plus.  DECnet Phase IV applications are
    supported by DECnet-Plus.
    
    DECnet Phase IV is also provided as an option.  
    
    If you install DECnet-Plus and TCP/IP  you can run DECnet 
    applications over a TCP/IP network.  Please see the OpenVMS 
    Management Guide for information on running DECnet over TCP/IP.    
    
    Do you want to install DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS I64 V8.3-1H1? (Yes/No) [YES] 

    If you answer NO to the DECnet-Plus prompt, you are prompted to install DECnet Phase IV:

    Do you want to install DECnet Phase IV for OpenVMS I64 V8.3-1H1? (Yes/No) [Yes]

    Finally, you are asked whether you want to install TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS:

    Do you want to install HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS V5.6? 
    (Yes/No) [Yes] Y
    

    Note:

    For support of Instant Capacity (iCAP) and Pay per use (PPU) functionality (supported on cell-based Integrity servers), and for support of such products as gWLM and HP SIM, you must install TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS. When you use HP SIM to provision OpenVMS on an Integrity server, TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS is installed automatically.

  18. Choose Descriptive Help Text (Optional): After you respond to the prompt for TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS, the final stages of the installation proceed. First, the procedure asks whether you want detailed descriptions:

        The installation can provide brief or detailed descriptions.
        In either case, you can request the detailed descriptions by typing ?.
    
    Do you always want detailed descriptions? (Yes/No) [No]

    If you answer YES, the procedure displays additional explanatory text with each prompt.

    As of Version 8.3, most PCSI kits included on the OpenVMS distribution media are signed using Secure Delivery. Each target file includes an associated digital signature file that is used for Secure Delivery validation. This validation involves authenticating the originator (HP, in this case) and verifying the contents of the target file. (The digital signature file is also referred to as a manifest; it has the same file name as the target file plus _ESW appended to the file extension, as in filename.PCSI$COMPRESSED_ESW.) When you install OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 from the distribution media, the procedure validates any signed PCSI kits that are being installed. For each kit successfully validated, you see a message similar to the following:

    Performing product kit validation ...
    %PCSI-I-VALPASSED, validation of
    DKB400:[KITS.CDSA]HP-I64VMS-CDSA-Vnnnn-nnn-n.PCSI$COMPRESSED;1 succeeded
       .
       .
       .

    Note that because of limitations in the OpenVMS Alpha CD boot environment, OpenVMS Alpha kits are not validated when installed from the distribution CD. On both OpenVMS Alpha and I64 systems, signed PCSI kits that you install susbsequently (including any signed kits on the distribution media) are validated. In addition, on both OpenVMS Alpha and OpenVMS I64 systems, the DCL command PRODUCT SHOW HISTORY displays the validation status of installed products. Any signed PCSI kits that you install susbsequently (including any signed kits on the distribution media) are validated. In addition, the DCL command PRODUCT SHOW HISTORY displays the validation status of installed products.

  19. Select Product Component Options (Accept All Defaults or Select Individually): The procedure displays a message such as the following, indicating that it is ready to install the operating system:

    The following product has been selected:
       HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1           Platform (product suite)
     
    
    Configuration phase starting ...
    
       
    You will be asked to choose options, if any, for each selected product and
    for any products that need to be installed to satisfy software dependency   
    requirements.
     
    HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1: OPENVMS and related products Platform
     
       COPYRIGHT 1976, 13-JUN-2007
    
       Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
    
    Do you want the defaults for all options? [YES]

    When selecting options, note the following:

    • If you want all the default values, press Enter.

      If you want to select options individually, answer NO. The procedure then prompts you for each option and suboption shown in Example 3.1.

    • Review the list of options and compare them with the requirements for your system. If you are selecting components individually, be sure that you include all components necessary to support the needs of your users. Note also that certain components depend on the installation of other components.

    • If you are not sure whether you want certain options, request help by entering a question mark (?) at the prompt for that option.

    • After you select all the options you want, you can view your selections and make changes (if necessary).

    • OpenVMS Management Station software is automatically installed on your OpenVMS system disk when you accept all the default values. If you do not accept the default values, you must select the OpenVMS Management Station component (server and client files) if you plan to use this product. After the installation is complete, you can prepare your OpenVMS system and your PC to run OpenVMS Management Station by following the procedures described in Appendix H.

    • If you decide after the installation to change which OpenVMS operating system options you want installed on your system, you must reconfigure the installation as described in Section  and Section .

    • After you boot the new system disk and log in, you can obtain information about individual system files by entering HELP SYSTEM_FILES at the dollar sign prompt ($).

    Note:

    Unless you have specific reasons to do otherwise, HP recommends that you accept the defaults and install all OpenVMS options. OpenVMS and layered products have various dependencies on many of these options. Even if you think you do not need certain options, some OpenVMS or layered product operations might not work correctly if other OpenVMS options are not installed.

    Note also that, for OpenVMS I64 installations, the availability of certain options depends on the OE you have purchased. For example, OpenVMS Management Station is available with the Enterprise Operating Environment (EOE) and the Mission Critical Operating Environment (MCOE).

    If you answer YES to accept the defaults for all options, the procedure displays a message similar to the following, the contents of which depend on the products you chose to install. If you answer NO, the procedure prompts you for each option and suboption.

    Availability Manager (base) for OpenVMS I64
        
    CDSA for OpenVMS I64 
    
    KERBEROS for OpenVMS I64
    
    SSL for OpenVMS I64
    
    Performance Data Collector for OpenVMS 
    
    
    WBEM Services for OpenVMS (WBEMCIM)
      HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728: HP WBEM Services for OpenVMS
        Copying WBEM Services for OpenVMS Release Notes to SYS$HELP
    ....There are post-installation tasks you must complete.
    
    WBEM Providers for OpenVMS (WBEMPROVIDERS)
    
       HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6: DECwindows Motif
    
        If a Language Variant is installed, refer to the Installation Guide.
    
  20. Finish Installation onto System Disk – Review and Confirm Options: When you have answered all the prompts and selected the options you want installed, the procedure displays information about the products you have selected. The procedure allows you to review your selections and make changes if necessary, then installs the product, provides informational messages, and returns you to the original menu.

    First, you are asked whether you want to review the options:

    Do you want to review the options? [NO] 

    If you answer YES, the procedure displays all the selected options and suboptions, similar to Example 3.1. If you answer NO, the installation continues as described with the sample script (beginning with "Execution phase starting ...") that follows.

    Component Options and Suboptions

        DECdtm Distributed Transaction Manager
        Support for DECnet-Plus or DECnet for OpenVMS
        Programming Support
            Debugger Utility
            Image Dump Utility
            Macro libraries
            Macro-32 Migration Compiler
            TLB intermediary form of STARLET
            C Object Libraries  (1)
            C Header Files
            VMS text libraries of Ada declarations
        RMS Journaling Recovery Utility
        System Programming Support
            Delta Debugger
            System Dump Analyzer Utility
            Miscellaneous Symbol Table Files
        OpenVMS Management Station Software -- PC files
        Utilities
            Phone Utility
            Error Log Generator Utility  (1)
            XPG4 Internationalization Utilities
            World Wide PostScript Printing Subsystem
        Bliss Require Files
        Example Files
        Message Facility Files (HELP/MESSAGE)
        Translated Image Support  
        UETP Files
        DECwindows Server Support
        Delete any obsolete OpenVMS files
        Delete files archived by OpenVMS remedial kits
    
    (1) (1)

    Alpha only

    The component options listed in Example 3.1 are included within the OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 operating system. Except as noted, these options apply to both OpenVMS Alpha and I64 systems. Depending on the products you chose to install with the operating system, additional components are included as well. After the procedure displays all selected options and suboptions, you are prompted as follows:

    Are you satisfied with these options? [YES]

    If you answer NO to this question, you are allowed to selectively configure options and suboptions, even if you did not do so previously. When you finish, you are asked again whether you are satisfied with the options you selected. When you answer YES to indicate you are satisfied with the selections, the installation begins installing OpenVMS onto the target disk. The following is a sample display:

    Note:

    Alpha systems only: If you perform two installations at the same time to systems connected by MEMORY CHANNEL, you might see a message similar to the following every 5 seconds:

                 
     %PMA0 CPU00: 25-SEP-2007 14:58:40 Remote System Conflicts with 
     Known System - REMOTE NODE
     %PMA0 CPU00: 25-SEP-2007 14:58:45 Remote System Conflicts with 
     Known System - REMOTE NODE

    Disregard the message. The installation or upgrade will proceed normally and the message is not present when the system reboots with its actual node name.

    Note:

    Names of products installed with OpenVMS differ between OpenVMS Alpha and I64 installations. For example, the OpenVMS I64 windowing and networking product names are all displayed as HP I64VMS product-name, such as HP I64VMS KERBEROS, while OpenVMS Alpha product names are displayed in any of three different ways, depending on the product and version:

    • HP product-name, such as HP AXPVMS KERBEROS V3.1

    • DEC product-name, such as DEC AXPVMS DWMOTIF V1.6

    • CPQ product-name, such as CPQ AXPVMS CDSA V2.3

    Execution phase starting ...
      
    The following products will be installed to destinations:
        HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3-1H1    DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306              DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3-1H1       DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6               DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS DWMOTIF_SUPPORT V8.3-1H1   DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152          DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1           DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284               DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6                 DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS TDC_RT V2.3-1              DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS VMS V8.3-1H1               DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728      DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
        HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31      DISK$I64SYS:[VMS$COMMON.]
    
    
    Portion done: 0%..10%..20%..30%..40%..50%..60%..70%..80%..90%
    
    %PCSI-I-PRCOUTPUT, output from subprocess follows ...
    % - Execute SYS$MANAGER:TCPIP$CONFIG.COM to proceed with configuration of
    %   HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS.
    % 
    Portion done: 100%

    Depending on the options you selected, certain messages such as the preceding TCP/IP message might be displayed at this point.

  21. Final Installation Confirmation and Information Messages:The installation continues, displaying the products that have been installed and relevant information. The version numbers in this example do not necessarily reflect the version numbers of the products actually shipped with OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1.

      
    
    The following products have been installed:
        HP I64VMS AVAIL_MAN_BASE V8.3-1H1   Layered Product
        HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306             Layered Product
        HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3-1H1      Layered Product
        HP I64VMS DWMOTIF V1.6              Layered Product
        HP I64VMS DWMOTIF_SUPPORT V8.3-1H1  Layered Product
        HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152         Layered Product
        HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1          Platform (product suite)
        HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284              Layered Product
        HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6                Layered Product
        HP I64VMS TDC_RT V2.3-1             Layered Product
        HP I64VMS VMS V8.3-1H1              Operating System
        HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728     Layered Product
        HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31     Layered Product
     
    HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1: OPENVMS and related products Platform
     
       HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152   
     
         Configure and set up Kerberos 
     
         If Kerberos will be run on this system, but has not been
         used previously, you need to perform the following steps.
            
         o Run the Kerberos configuration procedure:
          
           @SYS$STARTUP:KRB$CONFIGURE.COM            
    
         o Add the following line to SYS$MANAGER:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM:
            
            $ @SYS$STARTUP:KRB$STARTUP
    
         o Add the following line to SYS$MANAGER:SYLOGIN.COM:
    
           $ @SYS$MANAGER:KRB$SYMBOLS
    Press RETURN to continue:
    
      HP I64VMS SSL V1.3-284: SSL for OpenVMS I64 V1.3 (Based on OpenSSL 0.9.7e)
    
        There are post-installation tasks that you must complete
    
        after upgrading from previous SSL versions
    
        including verifying startup command procedures and logical names.
           
        Refer to SYS$HELP:SSL013.RELEASE_NOTES for more information.      
     
      HP I64VMS TDC_RT V2.3-1: The Performance Data Collector (base) for OpenVMS
    
        Users of this product require the following privileges:
         (CMKRNL,LOG_IO,WORLD,PHY_IO,SYSPRV,SYSLCK)
    
        Users of this product require the following process resource limits:
         WSQUO minimum 7000
    
        A read-me file is available in SYS$COMMON:[TDC]TDC_README.TXT
         
        Release notes are available in SYS$COMMON:[TDC]TDC_RELEASE_NOTES.TXT
    
      HP I64VMS TCPIP V5.6   : HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS.
     
        Check the release notes for current status of the product. 
  22. Installation Creates and Validates Boot Options (I64 only): At this point in an OpenVMS I64 installation, the procedure creates and validates boot options if you chose to have the procedure do so (see step 8).

    • If you answered NO in step 8, the following message is displayed:

      If there is an existing boot option that was used to boot this
      system disk, you may be able to use it. Otherwise, you will have
      to use the EFI Shell the first time that you boot the newly
      installed system. After booting, use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager
      to create a Boot Option. To do this log in to a privileged
      account and execute this command:
      
         $ @SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS

      The procedure then informs you that the installation is complete and prompts you to press Return (Enter) to continue, at which point it returns you to the OpenVMS main menu. You can select option 8 (“Execute DCL commands and procedures”) on the OpenVMS main menu and enter the command at the DCL triple dollar sign prompt ($$$) to start the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility.

    • If you answered YES in step 8, the installation procedure determines whether a boot entry already exists for the system disk (in this example, DKB400:):

      • If an entry is found, a message similar to the following is displayed:

            The EFI Boot Manager menu includes the following boot option(s)
            for DKB400:
        
        EFI Boot Options list:    Timeout = 0 secs.
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        01. DKB400 PCI(0|20|1|0)  Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)  "OpenVMS on DKB400: PKA0.1"
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        1 entries found.

        In this example, one boot option is found. If multiple entries are found and if they are all SCSI devices, the procedure displays the following message and then notifies you that the installation is complete:

        Please use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager to ensure that you 
        have a valid boot option for the system you have just installed.

        When one entry is found, or when multiple Fibre Channel entries are found, the procedure validates the boot options, as in the following example, in which the found entry fails to boot and is then fixed and validated:

        Validate EFI Boot Options list:    Timeout = 0 secs.
        -------------------------------------------------------------------
           1 OpenVMS on DKB400: PKA0.1
              DKB400 PCI(0|20|1|0) Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)  
              efi$bcfg: Option Failed. Fixing Boot Entry automatically.
                
         efi$bcfg: Entry 1 Boot0001 removed.
         efi$bcfg: DKB400 PCI(0|20|1|0) Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)  (Boot0001) Option
         successfully added 
        -----------------------------------------------------------------------
        1 entries validated.
      • If no existing entry is found, a boot option is created and the procedure displays the validation text, as in the following example:

        efi$bcfg: DKB400: (Boot0003)  Option successfully added
        
            The Boot Option is called OpenVMS on DKB400:;
            it is the first entry in the Boot Options menu, and is
            configured (by default) to boot from SYS0.
        
        VMS_FLAGS are set to -fl 0,30000
  23. Installation Completes and Returns to OpenVMS Menu: The installation procedure is now complete. The procedure displays information about the special startup procedure that runs when the newly installed system is first booted. It then prompts you to press Return (Enter) to continue. After you do so, you are returned to the OpenVMS operating system menu. The following is a sample display:

       The installation is now complete.
    
       When the newly installed system is first booted, a special
       startup procedure will be run.  This procedure will:
    
           o  Configure the system for standalone or OpenVMS Cluster operation.
           o  Run AUTOGEN to set system parameters.
           o  Reboot the system with the newly set parameters.
    
    
        You may shut down now or continue with other operations.
    
    
      Process I64VMS_INSTALL logged out at 25-SEP-2007 14:45:49.54
    
     Press Return to continue...
    
      ****************************************************************
    
      You can install or upgrade the OpenVMS I64 operating system
      or you can install or upgrade layered products that are included
      on the OpenVMS I64 distribution media (CD/DVD).
        
      You can also execute DCL commands and procedures to perform
      "standalone" tasks, such as backing up the system disk.
        
      Please choose one of the following:
    
        1)  Upgrade, install or reconfigure OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1
        2)  Display layered products that this procedure can install
        3)  Install or upgrade layered products
        4)  Show installed products
        5)  Reconfigure installed products
        6)  Remove installed products
        7)  Find, Install or Undo patches; Show or Delete recovery data
        8)  Execute DCL commands and procedures
        9)  Shut down this system      
        
    Enter CHOICE or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/?)
  24. Shut Down the System: Unless you want to perform other operations prior to booting the new system disk, choose the shutdown option (9) on the OpenVMS main menu to shut down the operating system, as shown in the following example. If you want to install layered products that have not been installed yet, HP recommends doing so during the postinstallation phase, as described in Section .

    Enter CHOICE or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/?)  9
        Shutting down the system
    
    
            SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE

    After you complete the installation and shut down the system, you can boot your new operating system disk, as explained in Section . If you are installing OpenVMS I64, make sure you remove the DVD from the drive before booting the system disk.

Booting the New OpenVMS System Disk

After you have successfully installed the OpenVMS operating system, the next step is to make the new system disk the default boot device. For OpenVMS Alpha systems, see Section . For OpenVMS I64 systems, this step may already have been done (see step 21 of the installation procedure in Section ), in which case you can boot the OpenVMS I64 system disk by performing the steps in Section .

To boot the OpenVMS Alpha system disk, follow the instructions provided in Section .

Booting the OpenVMS Alpha System Disk

For booting the OpenVMS Alpha system disk, first designate the new system disk as the default boot device by performing the steps in Section . Then, to boot the disk, perform the steps in Section .

Specifying the Default Boot Device on Alpha Systems

Before you boot the new system disk, perform the following steps:

  1. Halt the system by pressing either Ctrl/P or Halt. For more information about halting your Alpha computer, see Appendix A.

  2. At the console prompt (>>>), enter the SET BOOTDEF_DEV command in the following format:

    SET BOOTDEF_DEV target-drive

    Substitute the device name of the system disk for target-drive. The SET BOOTDEF_DEV command tells the system which disk to boot from. For example, if the system disk has the device name DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>>  SET BOOTDEF_DEV DKA400

    If the system disk is connected to a hierarchical storage device (HSx), the format for specifying that drive is different. For example, on a DEC 7000 series system connected to an HSC device, the command is similar to the following:

    >>>  SET BOOTDEF_DEV DUA20.14.0.2.0

    For more information about setting and showing the default boot device, see Appendix A .

How to Boot the New System Disk

To boot the system disk, enter the following command and press Enter:

>>>  BOOT -FLAGS 0,0

When the system starts booting, the initial informational messages displayed are similar to the following:

OpenVMS (TM) Alpha Operating System, Version 8.3

Installing required known files...

Configuring devices...
(c) Copyright 1976-2006 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.

Booting the OpenVMS I64 System Disk

The following steps explain how to boot your new OpenVMS I64 system disk. For more information about this and special booting operations, see Section . You can also use vMedia to boot an OpenVMS system disk; see Section .

Note:

Make sure you remove the DVD from the DVD/CD drive before booting the system disk.

The actions you take to boot the system disk depend on whether you have configured your system with a boot option for your system disk:

  • If you have configured your system with a boot option for your system disk, your system disk is displayed as a boot option in the EFI Boot Manager menu. Select your system disk and press Enter. If your system disk is the first option in the EFI Boot Manager menu, it might boot automatically after the 10-second countdown.

  • If you have not configured your system with a boot option for your disk, follow these steps:

    1. Press Enter or any other key. (You might see text that instructs you to "hit any key to cold reboot.") The machine displays several boot-related messages and then displays the EFI Boot Manager menu.

    2. Go to the EFI Shell prompt by selecting the EFI Shell [Built-in] option from the EFI Boot Manager menu. (This might be selected automatically if you do not make a selection before the EFI countdown completes.) A display similar to the following appears. An explanation of the two types of devices shown (blk and fs) follows the example.

      EFI Display of Boot Options
      fs

      The fs devices are file-structured logical partitions on physical disks that are included with your Integrity server system. One or more fs device exists for each volume with a bootable partition or diagnostic partition. Generally, fs0: corresponds to the target disk on which you installed OpenVMS I64 (unless the DVD was not removed, in which case fs1: corresponds to the target disk). For example, if the target disk is DKA0, then fs0: most likely corresponds to the target disk. On the other hand, if the target disk is a DKA100 or DKB200 or similar, the corresponding EFI device depends on what partitions are configured on the target disk.

      blk

      The blk devices are block devices. Multiple blk devices exist for each volume that has a bootable partition or diagnostic partition. These devices may include the DVD device as well as the diagnostic partitions on OpenVMS system disks. Diagnostic partitions are intended and reserved for use by HP Services. (For more information about this partition, see Appendix J.)

    3. To boot the OpenVMS I64 system disk, enter the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: is the device associated with the system disk (probably fs0:):

      Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi

      The OpenVMS I64 operating system now starts booting. A display similar to the following appears, followed by the prompt for user name and password:

       HP OpenVMS Industry Standard 64 Operating System, Version 8.3-1H1
        (c) Copyright 1976-2006 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.

      Note that HP Integrity servers maintain a system event log (SEL) within system console storage, and OpenVMS I64 automatically transfers the contents of the SEL into the OpenVMS error log. On certain machines, during a successful boot operation while using a console, you might see a message indicating that the Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) SEL is full. You can safely continue when the BMC SEL is full by following the prompts; OpenVMS processes the contents of the SEL.

Next Steps

When you boot OpenVMS from a new system disk, a special startup procedure runs that does the following:

  • Gives you the opportunity to configure the system for standalone or OpenVMS Cluster operation (see Section ).

  • Runs AUTOGEN to evaluate your hardware configuration, estimate typical workloads, and set system parameters (see Section ).

  • Reboots your system with the new parameters (see Section ).

After the system is rebooted with the new parameters, you can log into your SYSTEM account, as explained in Section . On Integrity servers, if you did not allow the OpenVMS installation procedure to create a boot option for your system disk, you can set up such an option now, as explained in Section . Appendix B includes additional information regarding setting up and booting HP Integrity servers.

Joining an OpenVMS Cluster

If you answered YES to the question about joining an OpenVMS Cluster, the system now asks a series of questions about your configuration (such as CI, DSSI, SCSI, local area, or mixed interconnect). If you answered NO to this question, the system immediately runs AUTOGEN, as described in Section . If you answered NO, you can still set up or join an OpenVMS Cluster after the installation is completed by manually running the cluster configuration utility. On an OpenVMS Alpha system, you can do this by entering the following command:

$ @SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG

On an OpenVMS I64 system, youYou can do this by entering the following command:

$ @SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG_LAN

For more information about cluster configuration, see the HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manual or the Guidelines for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations manual.

Table 3.2 lists the OpenVMS Cluster prompts and suggested responses. These prompts appear if you answered YES to the question about joining an OpenVMS Cluster or if you manually run SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG.COM or SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG_LAN.COM. Note that, depending on your responses and the particular cluster configuration, some prompts are not displayed.

Prompts for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations

QuestionHow to Respond

Will this node be a cluster member (Y/N)?

Enter Y.

What is the node's DECnet node name?

Enter the DECnet node name (for example, MYNODE). The DECnet node name can be from one to six alphanumeric characters in length and cannot include dollar signs ($) or underscores (_). This is the name you specified in step 12 of the installation procedure.

What is the node's DECnet node address?

Enter the DECnet node address; for example, 2.2. This is the address you specified in step 13 of the installation procedure.

Will the Ethernet be used for cluster communications (Y/N)? (Alpha only)

Enter N for an OpenVMS CI-only cluster or DSSI-only cluster. Otherwise, enter Y.[a]

Enter this cluster's group number:[b]

Enter a number in the range of 1 to 4095 or 61440 to 65535.

Enter this cluster's password:[b]

Enter the cluster password. The password must be from 1 to 31 alphanumeric characters in length and can include dollar signs ($) and underscores (_).

Reenter this cluster's password for verification:

Reenter the password.

Will MYNODE be a disk server (Y/N)?

Enter Y if you want local disks to be served to the cluster (mandatory for local area and mixed-interconnect configurations). See the HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manual for information about served cluster disks.

Will MYNODE serve RFxx disks (Y)? (Alpha only)

Enter a response appropriate for your DSSI configuration, if such disks are available.

Enter a value for MYNODE’s ALLOCLASS parameter.

In an OpenVMS Cluster environment, the allocation class value cannot be zero if the node serves DSSI or CI disks to other cluster members, or if volume shadowing will be used on this system. In either case, theThe ALLOCLASS value must be a number from 1 to 255.

HP recommends that you thoroughly review the chapter on cluster storage devices in the HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manual. This manual also includes the rules for specifying allocation class values.

Does this cluster contain a quorum disk (Y/N)?

For CI-only, SCSI, local area, and mixed-interconnect configurations, enter Y or N, depending on your configuration. For most DSSI systems, enter Y. However, if you are adding a two-system DSSI configuration to an existing cluster (in which case you might not need a quorum disk), you can answer N. If you enter Y, the system asks for the name of the quorum disk. Enter the device name of the quorum disk. For information about quorum disks, see the HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manual.

[a] The Ethernet might not be required for communication within a local area OpenVMS Cluster system configured with FDDI devices. Within certain Digital Storage Systems Interconnect (DSSI) or computer interconnect (CI) mixed-interconnect configurations, neither the Ethernet nor FDDI are required for communication. If your configuration fits either scenario, you can answer NO (N) to this question.

[b] Cluster group number and password are required by any cluster nodes that use the local area network. In a cluster that uses mixed interconnects, if any of the interconnects require the cluster number and password, then you must set the cluster number and password for all nodes.

Running AUTOGEN

At this point, the system automatically runs AUTOGEN to evaluate your hardware configuration and estimate typical workloads. AUTOGEN then sets system parameters, the sizes of page, swap, and dump files, and the contents of VMSIMAGES.DAT. When AUTOGEN finishes and your system reboots, the installation procedure is complete.

The installation procedure displays messages similar to the following:

    AUTOGEN will now be run to compute the new system parameters. The system
    will then shut down and reboot, and the installation or upgrade will be
    complete.

    After rebooting you can continue with such system management tasks as:

         Decompressing the System Libraries (not necessary on OpenVMS I64)
         Configuring networking software (TCP/IP Services, DECnet, other) 
         Using SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG.COM to create an OpenVMS Cluster
         Creating FIELD, SYSTEST, and SYSTEST_CLIG accounts if needed

%AUTOGEN-I-BEGIN, GETDATA phase is beginning.
%AUTOGEN-I-NEWFILE, A new version of SYS$SYSTEM:PARAMS.DAT has been created.
        You may wish to purge this file.
%AUTOGEN-I-END, GETDATA phase has successfully completed.
%AUTOGEN-I-BEGIN, GENPARAMS phase is beginning.
%AUTOGEN-I-NEWFILE, A new version of SYS$MANAGER:VMSIMAGES.DAT has been created.
        You may wish to purge this file.
%AUTOGEN-I-NEWFILE, A new version of SYS$SYSTEM:SETPARAMS.DAT has been created.
        You may wish to purge this file.
%AUTOGEN-I-END, GENPARAMS phase has successfully completed.
%AUTOGEN-I-BEGIN, GENFILES phase is beginning.
%SYSGEN-I-EXTENDED, SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSEXE]PAGEFILE.SYS;1 extended
%SYSGEN-I-EXTENDED, SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSEXE]SWAPFILE.SYS;1 extended
%SYSGEN-I-CREATED, SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSEXE]SYSDUMP.DMP;1 created

%AUTOGEN-I-REPORT, AUTOGEN has produced some informational messages that
        have been stored in the file SYS$SYSTEM:AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT. You may
        wish to review the information in that file.

%AUTOGEN-I-END, GENFILES phase has successfully completed.
%AUTOGEN-I-BEGIN, SETPARAMS phase is beginning.
%AUTOGEN-I-SYSGEN, parameters modified
%AUTOGEN-I-END, SETPARAMS phase has successfully completed.
%AUTOGEN-I-BEGIN, REBOOT phase is beginning.

The system is shutting down to allow the system to boot with the 
generated site-specific parameters and installed images.

Note:

After booting and running AUTOGEN, several messages are displayed at DECwindows startup. For information about these messages and how to avoid them, see the HP DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS Release Notes.

Rebooting After AUTOGEN

After AUTOGEN finishes, the system automatically shuts down and displays messages similar to the following:

The system will automatically reboot after the shutdown and the
installation will be complete.



     SHUTDOWN -- Perform an Orderly System Shutdown
                 on node I64CSI

%SHUTDOWN-I-BOOTCHECK, performing reboot consistency check...
%SHUTDOWN-I-CHECKOK, basic reboot consistency check completed
  .
  .
  .

The OpenVMS Alpha system should automatically reboot after the shutdown; the installation is finished. However, if the Alpha system does not reboot automatically, reboot the system manually. For example, if the system disk is on an RZ25 disk drive with a unit number of 1, enter the following command and press Enter:

>>> BOOT DKA400

After shutdown of an OpenVMS I64 system, it reboots automatically only if you have set the system disk boot option accordingly; otherwise, you must boot the system manually, as described in Section .

When the system reboots, it displays informational messages and accounting information indicating that your OpenVMS operating system has finished booting and is now ready for use. For example:

%SET-I-INTSET, login interactive limit = 64, current interactive value = 0
  SYSTEM       job terminated at  25-SEP-2007 14:51:23.47
   Accounting information:
   Buffered I/O count:            2177     Peak working set size:    6848
   Direct I/O count:              1358     Peak page file size:    179552
   Page faults:                   1805     Mounted volumes:             0
   Charged CPU time:     0 00:00:13.37     Elapsed time:    0 00:01:06.20

Logging In to the SYSTEM Account

The following two sections explain how to log in to the SYSTEM account from a character-cell terminal and from a workstation.

Logging In from a Character-Cell Terminal

Log in from a character-cell terminal by entering the user name SYSTEM followed by the password. The display is similar to the following:


        OpenVMS I64 Operating System, Version 8.3-1H1

Username: SYSTEM                                    
Password: 
  .                                       
  .
  .
   OpenVMS I64 Operating System, Version 8.3-1H1 

If you forget your password for an OpenVMS I64 SYSTEM account, follow the instructions in Section  to perform an emergency startup. If you forget your password for an OpenVMS Alpha SYSTEM account, see Section .

Logging In from a Workstation

If you installed the DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS software on your workstation, do the following after the login window is displayed on your screen:

  1. Enter the user name SYSTEM, press Tab, and then enter the password.

  2. Press Enter or click OK with your mouse.

  3. At this point, you can create a DECterm session or initiate other management functions. For information about creating a DECterm session, see the DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS Applications Guide.

Postinstallation Tasks

After you have successfully installed the OpenVMS operating system and logged in to the SYSTEM account, you must perform certain postinstallation tasks before you can use the system. For complete information, see Chapter 7.

Chapter 4 Before Upgrading the OpenVMS Operating System

This chapter describes which tasks you should perform prior to beginning an upgrade. Section  includes a checklist that you can use to make sure you perform all the tasks described in this chapter.

Preupgrade Tasks

Use the checklist in Table 4.1 to ensure that you perform all necessary tasks prior to upgrading your system.

Preupgrade Checklist

 TaskSection
Review relevant documentation.Section 

Review notes, cautions, and restrictions about the following:

  • Upgrade paths to Version 8.3-1H1

  • Update license requirements

  • Components you choose not to install

  • Upgrade issues after the system disk directory structure has been changed

  • Licenses and possible reinstallation requirements for layered products

Section 
Check for software that must be manually removed.Section 
Save files that you do not want deleted by the upgrade procedure.Section 
Prepare the system disk.Section 
Ensure that you have a recent FEEDBACK.DAT file.Section 
Perform required actions before upgrading in a volume shadowing environment.Section 
Back up the current system disk.Section 
Shut down the system.Section 

Documentation to Review Before Upgrading Your System

In addition to reviewing the information in this chapter, you might need to refer to the following sources of information as well.

OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 Documents

  • The Cover Letter for HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers

  • The Software Product Descriptions included with your distribution kit

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes

OpenVMS Version 8.3 Documents

Information in the following documents remains valid except where superseded by the OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 documents listed previously.

  • The Software Product Descriptions included with your distribution kit

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 New Features and Documentation Overview

Earlier OpenVMS Version Documents

Information in the following documents remains valid except where superseded by the OpenVMS documents listed previously.

  • HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems

  • Guidelines for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations

  • HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems (specifically, the chapter entitled “Managing System Parameters”), for information about using AUTOGEN, modifying the system parameters file (MODPARAMS.DAT), and related operations

  • HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual, for information about using system management utilities such as SYSMAN and ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE

  • HP OpenVMS Guide to System Security, for information about reestablishing your security environment after the upgrade

Notes, Cautions, and Restrictions

This section provides important information that can affect the success of your upgrade. Review the cautions, restrictions, and notes carefully before you begin the upgrade.

Upgrade Paths

You can upgrade directly to OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 from only the following versions of OpenVMS I64:

  • Version 8.3

  • Version 8.2-1

The following subsections describe the various types of upgrades to OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1.

Direct Upgrade Paths

You can upgrade directly to OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 from only the following versions of OpenVMS I64:

  • Version 8.3

  • Version 8.2-1

You can upgrade directly to OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 from only the following versions of OpenVMS Alpha:

  • Version 8.2

  • Version 7.3-2

Indirect Upgrade Paths

If you are running a version of OpenVMS Alpha earlier than Version 7.3-2, you cannot upgrade directly to Version 8.3. Instead, you must first upgrade to Version 7.3-2 (depending on the version of OpenVMS you are running, you might need to upgrade to an intermediate version first). For example, if you are running OpenVMS Alpha Version 7.1, you first need to upgrade to either Version 7.2, 7.2-1, or 7.2-2, and then you can upgrade to Version 7.3-2, and then to Version 8.3. If you are running OpenVMS Alpha Version 7.2 or later, you can upgrade directly to Version 7.3-2, and then to Version 8.3.

Update License Requirements

Important:

Before upgrading to OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1, you must have the appropriate OE license loaded on your system.Similarly, before upgrading your OpenVMS Alpha system, you must have the appropriate Alpha licenses loaded on your system.

HP software licenses grant the right to use the current version of a product or any previous version of the product at the time of purchase.

Note:

When you initially purchase the OpenVMS software and license, HP provides a Product Authorization Key (PAK) that is required to enable the License Management Facility (LMF) to register the license and to validate and authorize subsequent use of the product. A PAK does not provide license or new version rights. For more information about licensing and the License Management Facility, see the HP OpenVMS License Management Utility Manual.

If you need an Update License, please contact your HP Sales representative.

Components You Choose Not to Install

If you choose not to install optional OpenVMS networking software (DECnet or TCP/IP) or the DECwindows/Motif GUI during the upgrade, the upgrade procedure removes these products from the system disk. Note that TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS is installed automatically when OpenVMS is installed by HP SIM provisioning. For information about checking for appropriate versions of software on your system and for certain products requiring that you manually remove older versions, see Section .

Note:

Unless you have specific reasons to do otherwise, HP recommends that you accept the defaults and install all OpenVMS options. OpenVMS and layered products have various dependencies on many of these options. Even if you think you do not need certain options, some OpenVMS or layered product operations might not work correctly if other OpenVMS options are not installed.

Note also that, for OpenVMS I64 installations, the availability of certain options depends on the OE you have purchased. For example, OpenVMS Management Station is available with the Enterprise Operating Environment (EOE) and the Mission Critical Operating Environment (MCOE).

Licenses and Layered Products

The upgrade procedure is designed so that you do not need to reinstall most layered products after the upgrade. However, you might need to reinstall certain layered products because of product-specific installation procedures.

The upgrade procedure leaves your OpenVMS license and layered product licenses intact. You do not need to reinstall these licenses after you upgrade.

Software That Must Be Manually Removed

Before upgrading, if you are currently using DECram or TDC V2.0, these products must be removed manually; otherwise, the upgrade might fail. For other information about software that might need to be removed manually, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes and the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes.

Note:

The OpenVMS Alpha upgrade procedure checks for older versions of SSL and removes them if found.

Remove Older Versions of DECram for OpenVMS (Alpha Only)

Beginning with OpenVMS Version 8.2, DECram for OpenVMS becomes an integral part of the OpenVMS operating system. Before upgrading to OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3, you must manually remove earlier versions of DECram for OpenVMS that were customer installed. The upgrade procedure cannot remove DECram for OpenVMS automatically. If an old version of DECram for OpenVMS is installed, the upgrade procedure might abort; if the upgrade does complete, DECram for OpenVMS might cause errors or work improperly. This section explains how to remove an older version of DECram for OpenVMS from your operating system.

Before you shut down the operating system that you plan to upgrade, follow these steps to remove DECram for OpenVMS (if you have already shut down your operating system, you must reboot before continuing).

Important:

Perform these steps only on versions of OpenVMS Alpha prior to 8.2.

  1. Check for a POLYCENTER software installation (PCSI) utility DECram for OpenVMS installation by logging on to a privileged account and entering the following command:

    $ PRODUCT SHOW PRODUCT DECRAM

    If the resulting display shows that DECram is not found on the system, skip to step 3; otherwise, proceed to step 2.

  2. If the SHOW PRODUCT display shows that DECram for OpenVMS is installed, enter the following command to remove the product:

    $ PRODUCT REMOVE DECRAM

    Once this command has completed successfully, you are finished; you do not need to perform the next steps. If the product removal fails, go on to step 3.

  3. Check for files on your system from a VMSINSTAL utility DECram for OpenVMS installation by entering the following commands:

    $ DIRECTORY SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYS$LDR]SYS$MDDRIVER.EXE
    $ DIRECTORY SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYSEXE]MDMANAGER.EXE
    $ DIRECTORY SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYSMGR]MDRECOVER.EXE
    $ DIRECTORY SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYSHLP]DECRAM$HELP.HLB;*
    $ DIRECTORY SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYSTEST]DECRAM$IVP.COM;*

    If files are found, use the commands in step 4 to remove them. If no files are found, skip to step 5.

  4. Remove the files found in step 3 by entering the appropriate DELETE commands (the /NOCONFIRM/NOLOG qualifiers are optional):

    $ DELETE/NOCONFIRM/NOLOG SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYS$LDR]SYS$MDDRIVER.EXE*
    $ DELETE/NOCONFIRM/NOLOG SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYSEXE]MDMANAGER.EXE;*
    $ DELETE/NOCONFIRM/NOLOG SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYSMGR]MDRECOVER.EXE;*
    $ DELETE/NOCONFIRM/NOLOG SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYSHLP]DECRAM$HELP.HLB;*
    $ DELETE/NOCONFIRM/NOLOG SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*.SYSTEST]DECRAM$IVP.COM;*
  5. In addition, remove the DECram for OpenVMS startup file from the startup database by entering the following commands:

    $ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:SYSMAN
    SYSMAN> STARTUP SET DATABASE STARTUP$STARTUP_LAYERED
    SYSMAN> STARTUP REMOVE FILE MDRECOVER.EXE

    Ignore any “-STARTUP-E-FILNOTFND, STARTUP file MDRECOVER.EXE not found” errors. To exit from SYSMAN, press Ctrl/Z or enter EXIT.

Remove TDC Version 2.0 (Alpha Only)

TDC Version 2.0 was released for use on OpenVMS Alpha Version 7.3-2 systems. Prior to installing the current release of OpenVMS Alpha, remove TDC Version 2.0 from your system. (When you install the current version of TDC from the website mentioned in Section , the Version 2.0 files are removed automatically.)

Before you shut down the operating system that you plan to upgrade, follow these steps to remove TDC V2.0 (if you have already shut down your operating system, you must reboot before continuing):

  1. Check for a POLYCENTER software installation (PCSI) utility TDC V2.0 installation by logging on to a privileged account and entering the following command:

    $ PRODUCT SHOW PRODUCT TDC

    If the resulting display shows that TDC is not found on the system, no action is required; if TDC is found, proceed to step 2.

  2. If the SHOW PRODUCT display shows that TDC V2.0 is installed, enter the following command to remove the product:

    $ PRODUCT REMOVE TDC

Saving Archived Files from Being Deleted by the Upgrade

By default, the upgrade procedure deletes files that were archived as filename.type_OLD by OpenVMS remedial kits. If you do not want these files deleted, you can rename them before you perform the upgrade. Alternatively, you can have the upgrade procedure save them by responding to the prompts, as described in Section .

Preparing the System Disk

The following sections describe how to prepare the system disk for the upgrade. Operations include the following:

  • Checking for appropriate directory structure and preserving your security protections

  • Checking the SYSCOMMON directories

  • Examining the system disk

  • Checking the size of the system disk

  • Returning authorization and AGEN$INCLUDE files to the system disk

  • Verifying system parameters

Checking the Directory Structure and Preserving Your Security Protections

If you changed the directory structure on your system disk, the upgrade procedure does not work correctly. Restore your system disk to a standard directory structure before you attempt an upgrade.

The OpenVMS upgrade procedure provides new files and directories in the directory [VMS$COMMON...]. If you have any special protections and access control lists (ACLs), you need to reapply them to reestablish the security environment you currently have. For more information about creating and maintaining a secure environment, see the HP OpenVMS Guide to System Security manual.

Checking the SYSCOMMON Directories

For the upgrade to be successful, the SYSCOMMON directories in all system roots must be aliases (or hard links) for the VMS$COMMON directory. To check whether this is the case, enter the following commands if you are booted from the system disk that you are upgrading, and compare the displayed file identifiers to ensure that they are all the same:

$ DIRECTORY/FILE_ID/NOHEADING/NOTRAILING SYS$SYSDEVICE:[000000]VMS$COMMON.DIR
$ DIRECTORY/FILE_ID/NOHEADING/NOTRAILING SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYS*]SYSCOMMON.DIR

If you did not boot from the system disk that you are upgrading, mount the disk to be upgraded and specify the actual device name in the command. For example, if the system disk to be upgraded is mounted on DKA100, you would use commands similar to the following:

$ DIRECTORY/FILE_ID/NOHEADING/NOTRAILING DKA100:[000000]VMS$COMMON.DIR
$ DIRECTORY/FILE_ID/NOHEADING/NOTRAILING DKA100:[SYS*]SYSCOMMON.DIR

Output from the first command should list a single file. Output from the second command should list one file for each system root on the disk. Check whether the file ID is the same for all of the listed files and take action as follows:

  • If all the file IDs are the same, continue with the procedure described in the next section.

  • If all the file IDs are not the same, this system disk does not have the directory structure that OpenVMS requires, and the upgrade will not succeed. For assistance on resolving this, contact your software support representative.

Examining the System Disk

Examine and repair (if necessary) the system disk using the ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE command. (See the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: A-L for more information about this command.) Use the following procedure:

  1. Analyze the system disk for inconsistencies and errors in the file structure by entering the following command:

    $ ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE SYS$SYSDEVICE

    Ignore the following message:

    %ANALDISK-I-OPENQUOTA, error opening QUOTA.SYS
  2. If you find any other errors on the system disk, repair the errors by entering the following command:

    $ ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE/REPAIR SYS$SYSDEVICE

    Repeat steps 1 and 2 until no errors (other than the one shown in step 1) are returned.

Checking the Size of the System Disk

It is difficult to determine in advance how many blocks of disk space you need for the upgrade. It depends on how many files you have on the target disk already and on how many components you select during the upgrade procedure. However, the following information will help:

  • The maximum amount of disk space you need is approximately 675,000 blocks, but your system might use substantially less.

  • After you select the components you want installed on the system for the upgrade, the upgrade procedure calculates whether you have enough disk space, displaying the number of available blocks and the number required for the upgrade. If the procedure determines that your disk does not have enough space to perform the upgrade, it displays a message to alert you and allows you to terminate the upgrade so you can create more disk space and try the upgrade again.

    Note:

    If the files on your system disk are badly fragmented, you might not be able to complete an upgrade, even when the amount of disk space appears to be sufficient. HP recommends that you back up and restore the system disk prior to upgrading. Restoring the system disk from an image backup defragments the disk. For information about backing up and restoring your system disk, see Appendix F.

To see how much space you have on the system disk, enter the following command:

$ SHOW DEVICE SYS$SYSDEVICE

Returning Authorization and AGEN$INCLUDE Files to the System Disk

If you place authorization and AGEN$INCLUDE files on disks other than the system disk, the upgrade procedure will not find these files. This is because the other disks are not mounted during the upgrade. In addition, the logical names you set up to point to these files are not defined during the upgrade. The following sections explain how to make these files available to the upgrade procedure.

Authorization Files

OpenVMS allows you to relocate certain system files (mostly authorization files) off the system disk. You do this by copying the files to another location and then defining logical names as documented in the file SYS$MANAGER:SYLOGICALS.TEMPLATE. The logical names are defined in SYS$STARTUP:SYLOGICALS.COM.

When you boot your system from the OpenVMS operating system media, the logical names pointing to these files are not defined, and the disks where they are located are not mounted. Because of this, the upgrade cannot access the relocated files, possibly resulting in an incorrect or incomplete upgrade. The upgrade might finish without error, but the files might not be in place as expected.

Before upgrading your system, check the definitions of these logical names on your system. (If a file has not been relocated, the corresponding logical name might not be defined. This is acceptable.) If any logical name points to a location or file name other than the location and file name listed in Table 4.2, return the file to the default location and file name. To prevent the system from referencing the files located off the system disk, either delete the associated logical name (using the DCL command DEASSIGN/SYSTEM/EXEC), or shut down the operating system and reboot from the operating system media. After the upgrade and before booting the operating system, you can move these files back to their original locations off the system disk, using the DCL option (8) from the OpenVMS operating system menu.

Note:

Some files listed in Table 4.2, such as SYS$SYSTEM:VMS$PASSWORD_HISTORY.DATA and SYS$LIBRARY:VMS$PASSWORD_POLICY.EXE, might not exist on your system, depending on certain configuration settings. For information about these files, see the HP OpenVMS Guide to System Security manual.

Logical Names for Relocated Authorization Files

Logical NameLocation and File Name
LAN$NODE_DATABASESYS$SYSTEM:LAN$NODE_DATABASE.DAT
LMF$LICENSESYS$SYSTEM:LMF$LICENSE.LDB
NETNODE_REMOTESYS$SYSTEM:NETNODE_REMOTE.DAT
NETNODE_UPDATESYS$MANAGER:NETNODE_UPDATE.COM
NETOBJECTSYS$SYSTEM:NETOBJECT.DAT
NETPROXYSYS$SYSTEM:NETPROXY.DAT
NET$PROXYSYS$SYSTEM:NET$PROXY.DAT
RIGHTSLISTSYS$SYSTEM:RIGHTSLIST.DAT
SYSUAFSYS$SYSTEM:SYSUAF.DAT
SYSUAFALTSYS$SYSTEM:SYSUAFALT.DAT
SYSALFSYS$SYSTEM:SYSALF.DAT
VMSMAIL_PROFILESYS$SYSTEM:VMSMAIL_PROFILE.DATA
VMS$AUDIT_SERVERSYS$MANAGER:VMS$AUDIT_SERVER.DAT
VMS$OBJECTSSYS$SYSTEM:VMS$OBJECTS.DAT
VMS$PASSWORD_DICTIONARYSYS$LIBRARY:VMS$PASSWORD_DICTIONARY.DATA
VMS$PASSWORD_HISTORYSYS$SYSTEM:VMS$PASSWORD_HISTORY.DATA
VMS$PASSWORD_POLICYSYS$LIBRARY:VMS$PASSWORD_POLICY.EXE

AGEN$INCLUDE Files

If you use the AGEN$INCLUDE feature in SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT to include files containing additional parameter settings, and the files that are being included are not on the system disk, then do the following before upgrading:

  1. Move the files to the system disk.

  2. Update the AGEN$INCLUDE entries to reflect the new locations of these files. For these entries, do not use logical names that you defined in SYS$STARTUP:SYLOGICALS.COM or elsewhere for your normal startup procedure. When you boot the system from the OpenVMS operating system media for an upgrade, your normal startup procedure is not run, and so these logical names are not defined for the upgrade. In addition, when you first boot the upgraded system, a special startup procedure is used.

After the upgrade is complete, you can move these included files back to their original locations. If you do so, remember to re-set the AGEN$INCLUDE entries in SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT.

Verifying System Parameters

Verify (and modify if necessary) system parameters. (For information about verifying and modifying system parameters, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems .) During an upgrade, AUTOGEN initially generates parameter values based on parameter defaults. However, during the GETDATA phase, AUTOGEN modifies parameter values based on entries stored in SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT. In addition, AUTOGEN analyzes feedback information stored in the AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT file and, if the data is valid, adjusts any related parameter values accordingly. (AUTOGEN considers data as valid if the system has been up at least for 24 hours and the feedback is no more than 30 days old.) To ensure that your feedback data is up to date, follow the instructions in Section .

Important:

Any system parameters that you modified and did not enter in the SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT file are lost during the upgrade. To retain these parameters, enter their names and the values that you have in use for them in SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT. When AUTOGEN runs after the upgrade, it uses the values in SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT.

For example, if the current value of GBLPAGES is 30000, and you modified GBLPAGES by 128 pages above the default, add the following line to SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT:

MIN_GBLPAGES=30128  !Increased by 128 by PLM for product z 12/12/04

AUTOGEN compares the computed value of GBLPAGES with this MIN_ value (30128). If the computed value is less than the specified MIN_ value, AUTOGEN increases the value of GBLPAGES to the MIN_ value. Each time AUTOGEN runs, it makes the same comparison and adjusts the value of GBLPAGES, but never below the minimum indicated by MIN_GBLPAGES.

Important:

If you modify system parameters, note the following:

  • In general, you should allow AUTOGEN to calculate system parameters. You can hardcode values (such as GBLPAGES=value), but doing so overrides AUTOGEN and might not allow it to set an optimal value based on observed usage.

  • Whenever possible, use MIN_parameter values (such as MIN_GBLPAGES) to set the minimum value that can be set for a parameter by AUTOGEN. AUTOGEN increases the value if necessary. It also adjusts related parameters, unless they are hardcoded, in which case information is provided in the AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT file. Use MAX_parameter values to set a maximum value when you need to limit a parameter to a known maximum value.

  • Enter numeric values as integers, without commas (for example, 10000). Enter alphabetic characters in lowercase or uppercase.

  • HP recommends that you include comments in the MODPARAMS.DAT file indicating who changed the value, when it was done, and why it was done. An exclamation point serves as a comment starter and can appear anywhere on a line. The following is an example illustrating the modifications recommended in the preceding bulleted items:

    ! the following changes made by K.Newcomb on 9/20/03
    !
    SWAPFILE=0                 ! don’t re-size the SWAPFILE on AUTOGEN runs
    MIN_gblsections=750        ! required for DECwindows MOTIF
    MIN_NPAGEDYN=2750000       ! set npagedyn to a min of 2.75 million

For more information about using AUTOGEN as recommended, see Section .

If your system was upgraded previously, a new SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT file was created then. This file has comments and possibly duplicated entries that were created during that upgrade. If you upgrade again, SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT can become unnecessarily large and potentially confusing. HP recommends that you edit and reorganize SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT before you upgrade again.

Note:

On a cluster system disk, the MODPARAMS.DAT file should exist in SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSEXE] for each root. You must edit MODPARAMS.DAT as necessary for each root.

Ensuring You Have a Recent FEEDBACK.DAT File

Before upgrading your system, HP recommends that you have a recent AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT file. This file is in SYS$SPECIFIC:[SYSEXE] (that is, in [SYSx.SYSEXE], where x is the root; for example, SYS0 or SYS1). In OpenVMS Cluster systems, this file should exist in each node’s SYS$SPECIFIC directory. When the system (or each system in a cluster) is rebooted after the upgrade, AUTOGEN runs. If a recent AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT file is available, it is used. The data in this file helps AUTOGEN set system parameters for your specific applications and workload.

Note:

If you do not have a current AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT file, AUTOGEN might calculate system parameters that do not reflect your system's requirements. In that case, multiple cycles of running AUTOGEN and rebooting might be necessary before all layered products can be started. In some cases, successful startup can require additional entries in MODPARAMS.DAT. This should not be necessary if a current AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT file is available.

If you do not have the AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT file on your system, HP recommends that you create a current AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT file during a time when your system is running under a typical workload. To ensure the greatest data reliability, the system should be running for more than 24 hours but less than 30 days. Enter the following command:

$ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:AGEN$FEEDBACK.EXE

This runs very quickly and should not affect the performance of your system while it executes.

You can also specify the SAVE_FEEDBACK option when you execute the SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN.COM procedure; however, the data captured might not fully reflect the typical workload on your system.

Important:

If you start AUTOGEN without specifying the execution-mode parameter (FEEDBACK, NOFEEDBACK, or CHECK_FEEDBACK), AUTOGEN uses the feedback information in its calculations. However, if the feedback information reflects system up time of less than 24 hours, or if the feedback information is more than 30 days old, AUTOGEN includes warnings in the AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT file to alert you to potential problems with the feedback data. If you wrongly assume the feedback is valid, the parameter settings might vary significantly from your expectations.

If you specify FEEDBACK (or NOFEEDBACK), AUTOGEN uses (or does not use) the feedback regardless of the data’s reliability. AUTOGEN proceeds through the SETPARAMS phase (if you specified SETPARAMS, SHUTDOWN, or REBOOT as the end phase) and sets system parameters to the values it computed.

If you specify CHECK_FEEDBACK, AUTOGEN checks the validity of the feedback data. If AUTOGEN determines the feedback is suspect, then AUTOGEN ignores the feedback when computing parameter values. It stops at the TESTFILES phase and issues a warning in the report that parameters have not been changed. You must read the report and decide whether the calculated values are acceptable. You can either use them (by running the AUTOGEN SETPARAMS phase) or rerun AUTOGEN with valid feedback data.

Shadowing Environment

Because you cannot upgrade the operating system on a shadowed system disk (the upgrade will fail), you need to disable shadowing of the system disk and perform other operations before you can upgrade the operating system.

There are several methods for creating a nonshadowed target disk. This chapter describes how to change one of your existing shadowed system disks in a multiple-member shadow set to a nonshadowed disk that you can use as your target disk for the upgrade.

If you have a larger configuration with disks that you can access physically, you might want to use a copy of the system disk as your target disk. HP Volume Shadowing for OpenVMS describes two methods you can use to create this copy (using volume shadowing commands or BACKUP commands) and how to disable volume shadowing.

Setting the Boot Device

Be sure your system is set to boot by default from the disk you intend to upgrade. For OpenVMS Alpha systems, use the SHOW BOOTDEF_DEV and SET BOOTDEF_DEV console commands to accomplish this task. (For more information, see Appendix A.)

For OpenVMS I64 systems, HP recommends using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM) to add shadowed system disks in a multiple-member shadow set to the EFI boot device list and dump device list. Be sure to add all members to both lists. For more information about setting boot options and using this utility, see Section .

Creating a Nonshadowed Target Disk

Perform the steps described in this section to change one of your existing shadowed system disks to a nonshadowed disk.

Important:

If you simply use a MOUNT/OVERRIDE=SHADOW_MEMBERSHIP command to mount the volume to be upgraded, volume shadowing can overwrite the newly upgraded disk with information from a prior volume that has not been upgraded.

  1. Shut down all systems booted from the shadowed system disk.

  2. Perform a conversational (interactive) boot (for OpenVMS Alpha systems, see Section ; for OpenVMS I64 systems, see Section ) on the system disk you have chosen for your target disk. For OpenVMS Alpha systems, for example, enter the following command:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA100

    For OpenVMS I64 systems, enter the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: is the device associated with the system disk (such as fs1:):

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi -flags 0,1
  3. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, enter the following command to disable volume shadowing of the system disk:

    SYSBOOT> SET SHADOW_SYS_DISK 0
  4. Enter the CONTINUE command to resume the boot procedure. For example:

    SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
  5. After the boot completes, go to Section .

You now have a nonshadowed system disk that you can use for the upgrade.

Backing Up the System Disk

HP strongly recommends that you make a backup copy of the system disk and, if your configuration allows it, upgrade the backup copy. Then, if there are problems, you still have a working system disk.

Note:

OpenVMS Engineering has encountered cases where recovery from a failed upgrade has been difficult, expensive, or impossible because no backup of the preupgrade system disk was available. Various hardware or software failures or a power failure can make a partially upgraded system disk unusable. A backup copy might be the only route to recovery. The minimal time required to make a backup is a very wise investment.

To back up the system disk, follow these steps:

  1. Shut down the system (for OpenVMS Alpha systems, see Section ; for OpenVMS I64 systems, see Section ).

  2. Boot the operating system media, following the instructions for OpenVMS I64 in Section , and for OpenVMS Alpha in Section .

  3. Use the menu system to enter the DCL environment (option 8).

  4. Mount the system device and the target device on which you will make the backup copy. (If you are backing up to tape, skip to the next step.) For example, if your system disk is on DKA0: and the target device is on DKA100:, you might use the following commands. The /OVERRIDE qualifier used in this example allows you to mount the system disk without entering its volume label. The /FOREIGN qualifier is required for the target disk when you use the BACKUP /IMAGE command.

    $$$ MOUNT /OVERRIDE=IDENTIFICATION DKA0:
    $$$ MOUNT /FOREIGN DKA100:
  5. To back up the system disk to a magnetic tape, enter the following commands, where MTA0: is the magnetic tape drive and label is the volume label. Note that the BACKUP command automatically mounts the tape and begins the backup to it.

    $$$ INITIALIZE MTA0: label
    $$$ MOUNT /OVERRIDE=IDENTIFICATION DKA0:
    $$$ BACKUP /IMAGE /LOG DKA0: MTA0:label.BCK
  6. To back up to a device other than a magnetic tape drive, enter the BACKUP command. For example, if your system disk is on DKA0: and your target disk is on DKA100:, use the following command (the colons are required):

    $$$ BACKUP /IMAGE /LOG DKA0: DKA100:

    The /IMAGE qualifier causes the Backup utility to produce a functionally equivalent copy of the system disk, which is also bootable. The /LOG qualifier causes the procedure to display the specification of each save set file being processed. To compare the backed up files to the source files, use the /VERIFY qualifier. If any discrepancies are detected, the Backup utility displays an error message indicating the discrepancies.

  7. Log out from the DCL environment.

  8. Shut down the system by selecting option 9 on the menu.

For more complete information about backup operations, including a description of an alternative method that does not require booting from the operating system media, see Appendix F. For more information about the Backup utility, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: A-L.

Finishing Preupgrade Tasks

Continue the preupgrade tasks as follows, depending on whether you are upgrading in a standalone or OpenVMS Cluster environment:

IF ... THEN ...

You are upgrading a standalone system

  1. Review the checklist at the beginning of this chapter to verify that you have performed the necessary tasks.

  2. Log in to the SYSTEM account.

  3. Enter the following command:

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
  4. When the procedure asks whether an automatic system reboot should be performed, enter N (NO).

  5. Go to Chapter 6 to begin the upgrade procedure.

You are upgrading an OpenVMS Cluster system

  1. Review the checklist at the beginning of this chapter to verify that you have performed the necessary tasks.

  2. Go to Chapter 5.

Chapter 5 Preparing to Upgrade in an OpenVMS Cluster Environment

This chapter describes how to prepare to upgrade in an OpenVMS Cluster environment. If you are not upgrading in an OpenVMS Cluster environment, go to Chapter 6.

Preupgrade Tasks for OpenVMS Cluster Environments

Note:

Be sure you have performed the preupgrade tasks described in Chapter 4 before you upgrade your OpenVMS Cluster system.

Use the checklist in Table 5.1 to ensure that you perform all necessary tasks prior to upgrading your system in an OpenVMS Cluster environment.

Preupgrade Checklist for OpenVMS Cluster Environments

 TaskSection
Review relevant OpenVMS operating system and OpenVMS Cluster documentation. Section 
Familiarize yourself with mixed-version, mixed-architecture, and migration support in OpenVMS Cluster systems.Section 
If you are adding a new OpenVMS computer system to an existing OpenVMS Cluster, choose one of two options for upgrading.Section 

Perform the preliminary tasks required for the type of upgrade:

  • Concurrent upgrade

  • Rolling upgrade

Section :

Begin the upgrade.Chapter 6

Review OpenVMS Cluster Information

When you upgrade the operating system in an OpenVMS Cluster environment, be sure you review any relevant OpenVMS Cluster information contained in the following documents.

OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 Documents

  • The Cover Letter for HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers

  • The Software Product Descriptions included with your distribution kit

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes

OpenVMS Version 8.3 Documents

Information in the following documents remains valid except where superseded by the OpenVMS documents listed previously.

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 New Features and Documentation Overview

Earlier OpenVMS Documents

Information in the following documents remains valid except where superseded by the OpenVMS documents listed previously.

  • HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems

  • Guidelines for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations

Mixed-Version Support in an OpenVMS Cluster Environment

HP provides two levels of support for mixed-version and mixed-architecture OpenVMS Cluster systems: warranted support and migration support.

Warranted support means that HP has fully qualified two specified versions coexisting in an OpenVMS Cluster and will address all problems identified by customers using these configurations.

Migration support means that HP has qualified the versions for use together in configurations that are migrating in a staged fashion to a newer version of OpenVMS. Problem reports submitted against these configurations will be answered by HP. However, in exceptional cases, HP may request that you move to a warranted configuration as part of the solution. Migration support helps customers move to warranted OpenVMS Cluster pairs.

Warranted cluster support is provided for the combinations shown in Table 5.2.

Warranted Cluster Support

Operating systemWarranted in these combinations

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 or 8.3

or

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and OpenVMS VAX Version 7.3

  

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 or 8.3 and OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3

or

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 and OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3

Note:

Only two architectures are supported in the same OpenVMS Cluster: OpenVMS I64 and OpenVMS Alpha, or OpenVMS Alpha and OpenVMS VAX, but not OpenVMS I64 and OpenVMS VAX.

System disks are architecture specific and can be shared only by systems of the same architecture. An Alpha and I64 system, or an Alpha and VAX system, cannot boot from the same system disk. However, cross-architecture satellite booting is supported between an Alpha and VAX system. When you configure an OpenVMS Cluster to take advantage of cross-architecture booting, make sure that at least one system from each architecture is configured with a disk that can be used for installations and upgrades. For more information, see the Guidelines for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations and HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manuals.

Table 5.3 shows the supported migration pairings.

Supported Migration Pairing

Operating systemSupported with either of these migrating to OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1Supported with either of these migrating to OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.2-1

OpenVMS Alpha Version 7.3-2

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.2

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3

OpenVMS I64 Version 8.2-1

OpenVMS Alpha Version 7.3-2

OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.2

For information about valid upgrade paths, see Section .

For more information, see the OpenVMS Technical Software Support Service website at:

http://www.hp.com/go/openvms/support

In addition, see the following website for the OpenVMS Operating System Support Chart at:

http://www.hp.com/go/openvms/supportchart

Before introducing an OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 system into an existing OpenVMS Cluster, you might need to install certain patch kits (also known as remedial kits) on cluster members running earlier versions of OpenVMS. In a mixed-architecture cluster, you need to install an LMF patch on any OpenVMS Version 7.3-2 Alpha members. For a complete list of required patch kits, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes and the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes.

For information about supporting the Performance Data Collector base software (TDC_RT) in OpenVMS Clusters, see Section .

Adding a New System to an OpenVMS Cluster

To add a new OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 Alpha or I64 system to an existing OpenVMS Cluster configuration, all existing Alpha nodes in the cluster must be running OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3, and all existing OpenVMS I64 nodes must be running OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3 or later. Any node in the cluster that is running an older version of OpenVMS must be upgraded appropriately before you can add a Version 8.3-1H1 node. If you have a VAXcluster, any node running an older version of OpenVMS VAX must be upgraded to Version 7.3 of OpenVMS VAX before you can add an Alpha Version 8.3 node.

Alternatively, any OpenVMS Alpha or I64 node that needs to be upgraded can be removed temporarily from the cluster and added back after it has been upgraded. This allows you to form a supported cluster immediately, adding nodes back into the cluster as they are upgraded. Note that, depending on the number of nodes being added, you might need to adjust the EXPECTED_VOTES system parameter to reflect the number of voting nodes and any quorum disk votes (if a quorum disk is being used). In addition, for any node being removed from the cluster, you should specify the REMOVE_NODE option during system shutdown so that the quorum for the remaining nodes is correctly adjusted.

Types of Upgrades

Two types of cluster upgrades are available: a concurrent upgrade and a rolling upgrade. The type of upgrade you use depends on whether you want to maintain the availability of the cluster during the upgrade and whether you have more than one system disk. Review this chapter and then perform the preliminary tasks for the upgrade procedure (concurrent or rolling) that best suit your configuration.

Concurrent Upgrade

This section describes the following:

  • How a concurrent upgrade works

  • Preparing your system for a concurrent upgrade

How a Concurrent Upgrade Works

During a concurrent upgrade, you must shut down the entire cluster and upgrade each system disk. No one can use the cluster until you upgrade each system disk and reboot each computer. When the cluster reboots, each computer will run the upgraded version of the OpenVMS operating system.

If all systems in the OpenVMS Cluster environment are booted from one system disk, you must perform a concurrent upgrade.

Preparing Your System for a Concurrent Upgrade

To prepare for a concurrent upgrade, follow these steps:

  1. Log in locally to the SYSTEM account.

    If you have more than one system disk, make sure that you have performed the preupgrade tasks on each system disk that you are upgrading. Make sure the target system disk is not mounted on any other node in the cluster and remains dismounted during the upgrade. It should be mounted only on the system that is performing the upgrade. (For information about dismounting disks, see Section .) Then go to Chapter 6 and perform an upgrade on each system disk. You do not have to reboot the operating system media for each upgrade. You only need to choose option 1 on the menu for each upgrade.

  2. Shut down all systems by entering the following command on each system (satellite nodes first, then the boot nodes):

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
  3. When the procedure asks whether an automatic system reboot should be performed, enter N (NO).

  4. Choose the CLUSTER_SHUTDOWN option.

  5. When the shutdown procedure is finished on all nodes, halt each system by either pressing Ctrl/P or Halt. For more information about halting your Integrity server, see Section . For information about halting your Alpha computer, see Section .

  6. If you have only one system disk for your cluster, go to Chapter 6 to begin the upgrade procedure.

    After the upgrade is complete, you are instructed to reboot each computer in the OpenVMS Cluster environment before beginning other postupgrade procedures.

Rolling Upgrade

This section describes the following:

  • How a rolling upgrade works

  • Notes and restrictions

  • Preparing your system for a rolling upgrade

How a Rolling Upgrade Works

A rolling upgrade allows you to have a mixed-version cluster. During a rolling upgrade, you keep some of the computers in the cluster running and available while you upgrade others (you must have more than one system disk). You upgrade each system disk individually, allowing old and new versions of the operating system to run together in the same cluster.

Notes and Restrictions

The following restrictions apply to rolling upgrades. For additional compatibility issues and restrictions information, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes and the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes.

  • The system being upgraded does not attempt to access any disk that is being accessed by one or more of the remaining OpenVMS Cluster systems.

  • The remaining OpenVMS Cluster systems do not attempt to access the target disk of the system being upgraded.

    If the target disk being upgraded is locally attached to the system performing the upgrade, then it is not accessible to the remaining OpenVMS Cluster systems. (The OpenVMS system booted from the operating system media does not MSCP serve local disks.) HP recommends that, whenever possible, you perform the upgrade on a local disk or that you perform a concurrent upgrade.

    During the upgrade, be sure that the target disk you select, as well as any disk you access from the DCL menu option, is either a local disk or one that is not being accessed by any of the remaining OpenVMS Cluster members. Make sure the target system disk is not mounted on any other node in the cluster and remains dismounted during the upgrade. It should be mounted only on the system that is performing the upgrade. (For information about dismounting disks, see Section .)

    Note:

    Any attempt to access the target system disk from the remaining OpenVMS Cluster members will corrupt the target disk. Even if the target system disk is mounted only by a remaining cluster member and no file access is performed, the target disk will probably be corrupted. If a disk is corrupted in this way, the only supported recovery is to restore the backup copy of the corrupted disk.

  • HP recommends that all Alpha computers in a cluster run the same (preferably the latest) version of the OpenVMS Alpha operating system, and that all Integrity servers run the same version of the OpenVMS I64 operating system.

  • You cannot perform a rolling upgrade if all systems boot from a single system disk. Perform a concurrent upgrade instead.

  • The upgrade procedure affects the queuing system as follows:

    • The queuing system is not active on the system you are upgrading; do not attempt to execute a START/QUEUE/MANAGER command.

    • You cannot create a queue database on the operating system CD/DVD (because it is not writable).

    • The queue manager process on other nodes in the cluster can continue to run during the upgrade if the queue database is not on the disk being upgraded.

Preparing Your System for a Rolling Upgrade

To prepare for a rolling upgrade, follow these steps:

  1. Log in to any node where the target disk is mounted as a data disk rather than as the system disk. (That disk must be the one on which you already performed the preupgrade tasks described in Chapter 4.)

  2. Check the votes and make adjustments to maintain the proper quorum so the cluster can continue to operate throughout the upgrade. (HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems describes this procedure in detail.)

  3. Use the DCL command DISMOUNT/CLUSTER to dismount the data disk. (You can also perform this operation using the SYSMAN utility.)

    Note that you can ignore messages from nodes where the specified data disk is being used as the system disk.

  4. Verify that the data disk has been dismounted successfully by entering the following commands:

    $ MCR SYSMAN
    SYSMAN> SET ENVIRONMENT/CLUSTER
    SYSMAN> DO SHOW DEVICE disk-name

    Examine the display to be sure the disk is not mounted on any nodes as a data disk. Noting the value listed in the Trans Count field can help you make that determination: A value of less than 50 indicates that the disk is mounted as a data disk rather than as the system disk; a much larger value (for example, 300) indicates that the disk most likely is the system disk.

  5. If the disk is still mounted on any nodes as a data disk, use the SYSMAN utility to dismount the disk; otherwise, exit the SYSMAN utility.

  6. Use the following command to shut down any nodes that boot from the system disk you are upgrading (shut down satellite nodes first):

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
    1. When the procedure asks whether an automatic system reboot should be performed, enter N (NO).

    2. Choose the REMOVE_NODE option.

If a proper quorum is not maintained at any time during the upgrade procedure, the shutdown procedure hangs the cluster. If the cluster hangs during a shutdown, you can use the Interrupt Priority C (IPC) facility to adjust quorum from the system console of a system that is still a cluster member.

From an OpenVMS Alpha cluster member, press Ctrl/P. The IPC facility displays help information about IPC commands. Enter the commands at the console:

$ Ctrl/P
>>> D SIRR C
>>> C
Interrupt Priority C

Commands:

  C device    Cancel Mount Verification
  Q           Adjust Quorum
  CTRL-Z      Exit IPC
  CTRL-P      Prompt for Crash
IPC> Q
IPC> Ctrl/Z

From an OpenVMS I64 cluster member, pressing Ctrl/P puts the system directly into the IPC facility, which displays help information about IPC commands. To adjust quorum, enter the commands shown in the following example. Note that if systems are booted with XDELTA, pressing Ctrl/P brings the OpenVMS I64 system into XDELTA. The IPC facility is not available in this case.

$ Ctrl/P
Interrupt Priority C

Commands:

  C device    Cancel Mount Verification
  Q           Adjust Quorum
  CTRL-Z      Exit IPC
  CTRL-P      Prompt for Crash
IPC> Q
IPC> Ctrl/Z

You can also adjust quorum using Availability Manager or DECamds. The method is equivalent to that used by IPC except you do not have to use the console (this assumes the Data Analyzer is running on a system outside the OpenVMS Cluster, which is recommended). For more information, see the “Adjust Quorum” section in the Availability Manager User’s Guide or the DECamds User’s Guide. The Availability Manager User’s Guide is available at:

http://www.hp.com/products/openvms/availabilitymanager

After the shutdown procedure is finished on all nodes, go to Chapter 6 to begin the upgrade procedure.

Caution:

During the upgrade it is very important that the system disk being upgraded is accessed only by the node on which the upgrade is being performed. If the disk can be accessed from other nodes in the cluster, for example, through an HSC or HSJ device, you must ensure that this does not happen. Even if the disk is only mounted and no file access is performed, the disk can still become corrupted.

Ensure that any users who might mount disks know that they must not access the system disk being upgraded. Also make sure that any procedures that might mount the disk do not run during the upgrade. If you have automatic procedures that periodically check and remount disks, it would be wise to disable them during the upgrade.

Chapter 6 Upgrading the OpenVMS Operating System

This chapter explains how to upgrade the OpenVMS operating system from a local CD or DVD drive and includes information about reinstalling or reconfiguring your system.

This chapter is organized into sections that describe the major tasks for upgrading OpenVMS, in the order in which these tasks must be performed. Section  includes a checklist that you can use to make sure you perform all the upgrade tasks described in this chapter.

Upgrade Tasks

Use the checklist in Table 6.1 to ensure that you perform all necessary upgrade tasks.

Upgrade Checklist

 TaskSection
Boot the OpenVMS operating system media.Section 
Use option 1 of the operating system menu to upgrade your OpenVMS operating system, respond to the prompts, and shut down the system when the upgrade completes.Section , Section 
If you did not allow the upgrade procedure to create a boot option for your upgraded system disk, add a boot option now, if desired. (OpenVMS I64 only)Section 
Reboot your system. (The steps vary according to the type of upgrade you are performing.) Section 
Perform postupgrade tasks, as necessary. Chapter 7

Booting the OpenVMS Operating System Media

The OpenVMS operating system includes procedures that allow you to easily upgrade the operating system using the PCSI utility. These tools are available once you boot the system properly. To boot the OpenVMS Alpha system CD, see Section . To boot the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD, see Section .

You can use a VGA graphics device, serial device, or network interface for the console. For information about configuring your system console, see Section .

Note:

When using a VGA console and upgrading from vMedia or a USB DVD drive with the keyboard plugged into a USB hub, if the keyboard is not responding, simply unplug the hub and plug it back in.

Booting the OpenVMS Alpha Operating System CD

To get started, boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD either from your local CD drive or from a CD drive served by the InfoServer, as described in Section  and Section . First, you need to identify the name of the CD drive, as explained in Section . For more information about booting operations, see Section .

Determining the Boot Device

To boot the operating system CD, you need to determine the identity of the CD drive. Follow these steps:

  1. Insert the operating system CD into the local CD drive.

  2. Enter the SHOW DEVICE command at the console prompt (>>>) and look for the correct drive listed in the output (for example, DKA400). If you are booting from the InfoServer, look for a device listed with its hardware address, as in the last line of the following example (EWA0):

    >>> SHOW DEVICE
    dva0.0.0.1000.0    DVA0                     RX23
    dka200.2.0.5.0     DKA200                   RZ28M  1004
    dka300.3.0.5.0     DKA300                   RZ29B  0016
    dka400.4.0.5.0     DKA400                   RRD42  442E
    ewa0.0.0.3.0       EWA0         00-00-F8-1F-70-3D

    For additional information, see the HP OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and HP OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 Software Product Description (SPD 82.35.xx) and the hardware manuals that you received with your Alpha computer.

Booting from the Local Drive

To boot the operating system CD from the local CD drive, enter the boot command in the following format:

BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 source-drive

Substitute the device name of the CD drive for source-drive, such as DKA400, as listed in the SHOW DEVICE display example in Section . In this case, you would enter the following command and press Enter:

>>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 DKA400

Booting from the InfoServer

To boot the operating system CD using either the InfoServer hardware or the InfoServer utility, follow these steps. To use the InfoServer utility, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only), as described in Appendix C; note that the operating system CD must be mounted systemwide.

  1. At the console prompt, enter the boot command in the following format:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 -FILE APB_083 lan-device-name
     

    Substitute the name of the local area network device for lan-device-name, such as EWA0, as listed in the SHOW DEVICE display example in Section .

    The APB file name is the unique file name that was assigned to the APB.EXE file when it was copied from the operating system CD to the InfoServer. This file is the name of the APB program used for the initial system load (ISL) boot program.

    Note:

    If you are using a DEC 3000 or 4000 series system, note the following:

    • On DEC 3000 series systems, you can boot through the InfoServer using an alternate TURBOchannel device, such as a PMAD (Ethernet) or DEFTA (FDDI), by specifying the device name as n/ESA0. The value for n is the TURBOchannel slot number, which you can obtain by entering the SHOW CONFIGURATION command at the console prompt (>>>) and examining the display. For more information, see Section  in Appendix A.

    • On DEC 4000 series systems, you must specify the ISL file name in uppercase (APB_083).

  2. The InfoServer ISL program then displays the following menu:

       
    Network Initial System Load Function
    Version 1.2
    
    
       FUNCTION         FUNCTION
         ID
         1     -        Display Menu
         2     -        Help
         3     -        Choose Service
         4     -        Select Options
         5     -        Stop
    
     Enter a function ID value:
  3. Respond to the prompts as follows, pressing Enter after each entry:

    1. Enter 3 for the function ID.

    2. Enter 2 for the option ID.

    3. Enter the service name (ALPHA083 is the default service name for the InfoServer hardware; for the InfoServer utility, ask your system or network manager for the service name).

    A sample display follows:

     Enter a function ID value: 3
      OPTION          OPTION
        ID
        1     -       Find Services
        2     -       Enter known Service Name
        
     Enter an Option ID value: 2
     Enter a Known Service Name: ALPHA083

Note:

If you boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD from an InfoServer system but lose your connection during the upgrade procedure (the system is unresponsive and pressing Ctrl/Y does not return you to the menu), do the following:

  1. Boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD again from the network.

  2. Enter the DCL environment by choosing option 8 on the menu.

  3. Mount the device containing your backup copy of the target disk and the device that is your target disk.

  4. Restore the backup copy of your target disk by entering the appropriate BACKUP commands. (See Appendix F for complete information about using MOUNT and BACKUP commands to restore a system disk.)

  5. Log out from the DCL environment.

  6. Perform the upgrade again by choosing the upgrade option (1) on the menu and following the procedures described in this chapter.

Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD

You can boot the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD in any of the following ways. This section gives detailed instructions on booting from the local DVD drive. Detailed instructions on the other methods are available in the appendixes, as noted in the corresponding sections that follow.

  • From your local DVD drive (Section )

  • From a virtual DVD drive served over the network by the InfoServer utility (Section )

  • From an image on a PC or Windows server in the network accessed through the HP SIM interface (Section )

  • From an image on a PC or Windows server in the network using vMedia through a browser connected to your Integrity server iLO 2 MP port (Section )

The latter two options can be used for entry-class Integrity servers that support such means; they can be used when a local DVD drive is not available. For more information about booting operations, see Section .

Booting from the Local Drive

To boot a local OpenVMS I64 OE DVD, follow these steps. To boot the DVD on a cell-based server, a DVD device must be accessible by the nPartition that OpenVMS is being installed on.

  1. Make sure your Integrity server is powered on. If your system has an attached external device, make sure it is turned on and operational.

  2. Insert the DVD into the drive you want to use.

  3. Cycle power.

  4. From the main EFI boot menu (for cell-based servers, this must be the EFI boot menu for the nPartition on which OpenVMS is to be booted), select the appropriate item from the boot options list. Note that the EFI boot menu is timed; press any key to stop the countdown timer.

    For some systems, the boot option to select is the Internal Bootable DVD option. If that option is not listed in your EFI boot menu, move to the Boot From a File menu and select the Removable Media Boot option, if present.

    Alternatively (and this method is recommended for cell-based servers), boot the DVD drive from the EFI Shell prompt by entering the command shown in the following example, where fsn: corresponds to the Integrity server DVD drive (such as fs0:). Note that if you have navigated to a particular file system, the EFI Shell prompt would reflect that file system; for example, if the current file system is fs0:, the EFI Shell prompt would be fs0:>.

    Shell> fsn:\efi\boot\bootia64.efi

    To determine which device is the bootable DVD drive, examine the list of mapped devices and look for an fs device listing that includes the letters “CDROM”, as in the following line, where fsn is the file system associated with the drive, which is usually fs0: (instead of "fsn", you might see something similar to "V8.3-1H1"; instead of Ata, you might see Scsi, depending on the server model):

    fsn : Acpi(HWP0002,400)/Pci(4|1)/Ata(Primary,Master)/CDROM(Entry0)

    You can use the following command to display the mapping of various EFI device names to OpenVMS device names, where fsn is the device you want to check (such as fs0:):

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\ms_show dev -fs

    On most Integrity servers, the DVD drive is DQA0: (IDE) or DNA0: (USB). On systems that include a SCSI bus, such as the Superdome server, the DVD drive is DKA0:. For more information about the vms_show command, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual.

    Note:

    By default, certain versions of EFI might interpret the Delete (or Backspace) key differently than do OpenVMS Alpha systems or Microsoft Windows computers. In such cases, press Ctrl/H to delete the last character entered. For more information, see Section .

When the DVD boots properly, the OpenVMS operating system banner appears, followed by the operating system menu. You can now upgrade your OpenVMS I64 operating system on the target disk (see Section ). If the methods documented in this section do not succeed in booting the DVD, see Section .

Note:

When booting OpenVMS from the installation DVD for the first time on any OpenVMS I64 system with a SAN storage device, you might experience a delay in EFI initialization because the entire SAN is scanned. Depending on the size of the SAN, this delay might range from several seconds to several minutes.

Booting Over the Network Using the InfoServer Utility

To use the InfoServer utility to boot from the network, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only); see Appendix C. The instructions on booting over the network from a virtual DVD drive are also included in Appendix C.

Booting Using HP SIM Provisioning

To use HP SIM provisioning to boot an image of the OpenVMS OE DVD, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only). For these steps and the booting instructions, see Appendix D. For upgrades, your OpenVMS boot flags must be set to (0,0).

Booting Using vMedia

To use vMedia to boot an image of the OpenVMS OE DVD, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only); see Section . For instructions on booting with vMedia, see Section .

Performing the Upgrade

The following sections describe how to upgrade from the operating system media.

Upgrading the System Using Option 1 of the Operating System Menu

After you boot the operating system CD (OpenVMS Alpha) or DVD (OpenVMS I64 OE DVD), the HP copyright banner and several messages appear, followed eventually by the operating system main menu. Choose the upgrade option (1) on the menu, as in the following example:


  Installing required known files...

  Configuring devices...
       .
       .
       .
  ****************************************************************

  You can install or upgrade the OpenVMS I64 operating system
  or you can install or upgrade layered products that are included
  on the OpenVMS I64 distribution media (CD/DVD).

  You can also execute DCL commands and procedures to perform
  "standalone" tasks, such as backing up the system disk.
    
  Please choose one of the following:

  1)  Upgrade, install or reconfigure OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1
  2)  Display layered products that this procedure can install
  3)  Install or upgrade layered products
  4)  Show installed products
  5)  Reconfigure installed products
  6)  Remove installed products
  7)  Find, Install or Undo patches; Show or Delete recovery data
  8)  Execute DCL commands and procedures
  9)  Shut down this system      
    
Enter CHOICE or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/?) 1

Choosing INITIALIZE or PRESERVE

The procedure displays the following information and prompts:

  ***********************************************************

  This procedure will ask a series of questions.

       () - encloses acceptable answers
       [] - encloses default answers

  Type your response and press the <Return>key.  Type:

       ? - to repeat an explanation
       ^ - to change prior input (not always possible)
       Ctrl/Y - to exit the installation procedure

  There are two choices for installation/upgrade:

  Initialize - removes all software and data files that were
      previously on the target disk and installs OpenVMS I64.

  Preserve -- installs or upgrades OpenVMS I64 on the target disk
      and retains all other contents of the target disk.

  * NOTE: You cannot use preserve to install OpenVMS I64 on a disk on
       which any other operating system is installed. This includes
       implementations of OpenVMS for other architectures.

Do you want to INITIALIZE or to PRESERVE? [PRESERVE]) 

For an upgrade, press Enter (or Return) to accept the default (PRESERVE).

Specifying the Target Disk

Next the procedure asks for the name of the target disk. If you enter a question mark (?), the system displays a list of devices on your system. Select the appropriate disk and respond to the prompt. For example:

  You must enter the device name for the target disk on which
  OpenVMS I64 will be installed.

Enter device name for target disk: [DKB300] (? for choices)  DKB400

If you select a device that is not available or that cannot be used for some other reason, the system displays information indicating why the device cannot be used. For example, if you enter MKA500, a tape device, a message similar to the following is displayed:

MKA500 is not a disk device

Caution:

If the selected target disk includes .EXE or .COM files installed by a previous upgrade or installation in one or more system-specific root directories in SYS$COMMON, the upgrade procedure tells you that when you boot from a root that contains any of these files, they are used instead of the files provided by the newer version of OpenVMS. This can make the upgraded system unbootable or cause errors after booting. Unless an HP representative has advised you to keep one or more of these files where they are, you must delete, rename, or move these files from the system-specific root directory. The procedure lists the names and locations of these files. Record these if you are not using a hardcopy terminal. The procedure gives you the option of terminating the upgrade so that you can do what is necessary for these files: select option 8 (“Execute DCL commands and procedures”) on the OpenVMS main menu and enter the appropriate DCL commands.

Selecting Reinstallation and Reconfiguration Options

If you are using the OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 operating system media and you selected a target disk that already has Version 8.3-1H1 installed, you are presented with several configuration options. A sample display follows. See also the example in Section .

  Version 8.3-1H1 of the OpenVMS operating system is already installed 
  on DKB400:.

  Please choose one of the following:

     1)  Reconfigure the OpenVMS platform.
     2)  Reconfigure the OpenVMS operating system.
     3)  Reinstall the OpenVMS operating system.
     4)  Return to the Main Menu (abort the upgrade/installation).

     Enter a "?" for more information.

If you enter a question mark (?), the following information is displayed:

o Reconfigure the OpenVMS platform.

  This action will allow you to change your selections of which  
  products you installed along with the OpenVMS operating system
  installation.

  This will NOT change any options in the OpenVMS operating system,
  nor will it reinstall any operating system files.

o Reconfigure the OpenVMS operating system.

  This action will allow you to change your choices about which
  options you included for the OpenVMS operating system.

  This will NOT change any options for the products you installed
  along with the OpenVMS operating system installation, nor will
  it reinstall or upgrade any of them.

o Reinstall the OpenVMS operating system.

  This action will cause ALL operating system  files to be replaced.
  You can also change your choices about which options you included
  for the OpenVMS operating system.

  This will NOT change any options for the products you installed
  along with the OpenVMS operating system installation, nor will
  it reinstall or upgrade any of them.

  Reinstall will take longer than Reconfigure.  Reinstall may be
  appropriate if you suspect that files in the operating system,
  or in the windowing and network products have become corrupted.


If you want to reinstall or upgrade any of the products you installed 
along with the OpenVMS operating system installation, choose "Install
or upgrade layered products" (option 3) from the main menu.

If you want to change your choices about which options you included
for any of the products you installed along with the OpenVMS operating
system installation, choose "Reconfigure installed products" (option 5) 
from the main menu.

Next the menu is redisplayed:

   Please choose one of the following:

      1)  Reconfigure the OpenVMS platform.
      2)  Reconfigure the OpenVMS operating system.
      3)  Reinstall the OpenVMS operating system.
      4)  Return to the Main Menu (abort the upgrade/installation).


Enter choice or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/?)

For additional configuration information, see Section .

Checking for Recovery Data

If you specify the /SAVE_RECOVERY_DATA qualifier with the PRODUCT INSTALL command, the PCSI utility saves information that can be used for removing patches and mandatory update kits at a later time. Use the PRODUCT UNDO PATCH command to remove the patches and kits. The /SAVE_RECOVERY_DATA qualifier and PRODUCT UNDO PATCH command were first added to OpenVMS Alpha in Version 7.3-2; they were backported to OpenVMS Alpha Version 7.2-2, 7.3, and 7.3-1.

The upgrade procedure now checks the disk for recovery data saved by the PCSI utility. Any recovery data must be removed before the upgrade can continue because this data becomes invalid after the upgrade. If no recovery data is present, the upgrade continues. If recovery data is present and all the data found applies only to the OpenVMS operating system, the upgrade procedure deletes the data and continues. (The procedure does not display the deletion of the files because earlier patches to OpenVMS are always removed as part of the upgrade.) If any of the recovery data applies to products other than the OpenVMS operating system, then the upgrade procedure displays a message similar to the following:

     The target system has recovery data from PRODUCT operations which
     used the /SAVE_RECOVERY_DATA qualifier.  This data must be deleted
     to continue the OpenVMS upgrade.

     Please examine the following display.

     If you wish to delete this data and continue the OpenVMS upgrade,
     answer YES to the question "Do you want to continue?"

     If you do not wish to delete this data, answer NO.  A NO answer
     will preserve the recovery data and abort the OpenVMS upgrade.

 The following patch recovery data has been selected:

 RECOVERY DATA SET 001 created 25-JUL-2007 15:23:39.69
   -------------------------------------- ---------------------------------
   PATCH                                  APPLIED TO
   -------------------------------------- ---------------------------------

   JAK VMS RM1 V1.0                       JAK VMS RMTEST V1.0
   -------------------------------------- ---------------------------------
 
* If you continue, recovery data for the patches listed above will be deleted.
* The deletion of recovery data does not affect the installation status of
* patches applied to products that are not participating in this operation.
* However, continuing with this operation prevents you from uninstalling
* these patches at a future time by use of the PRODUCT UNDO PATCH command.
 
 Do you want to continue? [YES]

If you answer YES (the default), the recovery data sets are deleted and the OpenVMS upgrade continues.

    
Deleting RECOVERY DATA SET 001 ...

If you answer NO, the recovery data sets are not deleted and the OpenVMS upgrade aborts.

Do you want to continue? [YES] NO
%PCSIUI-I-USERABORT, operation terminated by user request

     You chose to retain recovery data on the target system disk.
     The OpenVMS upgrade cannot continue.

     Please correct the situation that prevents you from deleting the
     recovery data and then retry the upgrade.

Specifying the Volume Label

After you specify the target disk and, if applicable, check for recovery data, the procedure informs you of the volume label currently assigned to the target disk you specified and asks whether you want to keep that label. As shown in the following example, if you choose not to keep the label, you are prompted for a new label. The OpenVMS operating system uses the volume label to identify and reference the disk. Make sure the label you use is unique; problems occur if the same label is used by different disk volumes.

   DKB400: is now labeled I64SYS.
Do you want to keep this label? (Yes/No) [Yes] NO

Enter volume label for target system disk: [I64SYS]  I640831H1

You can accept the default label assigned by the system or specify a different volume label. (The label name has a limit of 12 characters that can include A to Z, 0 to 9, the dollar sign ($), hyphen (-), and underscore(_) characters).

Note:

OpenVMS requires that the volume labels for all disks on your system or OpenVMS Cluster have unique labels. If a disk that has the same label as the system disk is mounted, various OpenVMS components will not function as intended or a node might crash during boot.

If you change the volume label for a disk in an OpenVMS Cluster, be sure to change the command that mounts the disk on other nodes in the cluster; otherwise, the disk will not mount on those nodes once they are rebooted.

Specifying the On-Disk Structure Level

If the target disk is currently initialized with On-Disk Structure Level 2 (ODS-2), the procedure informs you and gives you the option to convert the disk to On-Disk Structure Level 5 (ODS-5), as in the following example. The information pertaining to WBEM Services for OpenVMS appears only if you are upgrading an OpenVMS I64 system. If the target disk is currently initialized with ODS-5, the upgrade continues without displaying information about the disk structure. You are not asked whether to convert the system disk's structure or whether to enable hard links.

Note:

If your disk was initialized with ODS-5, and hard links was not enabled but now you want to enable hard links, you can enable them prior to the upgrade by using the following commands as shown:

$ SET VOLUME/VOLUME_CHARACTERISTICS=HARD_LINKS SYS$SYSDEVICE
$ ANALYZE DISK_STRUCTURE/REPAIR SYS$SYSDEVICE
   The target system disk is currently at On-Disk Structure Level 2
   (ODS-2).  It can be converted to On-Disk Structure Level 5 (ODS-5).

   OpenVMS I64 systems include WBEM Services for OpenVMS; the WBEM data
   repository requires an ODS-5 disk.  If you choose to convert the
   target system disk to ODS-5, the repository can be on the system 
   disk; otherwise you will need to provide an additional ODS-5 disk. 
   (? for more information.)

Do you want to convert the target system disk to ODS-5? (Yes/No/?) 

If you answer YES, the disk will be converted to ODS-5. The procedure informs you that you can use the BACKUP/CONVERT command to convert ODS-5 disks back to ODS-2 format; for more information, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: A-L.

Note:

HP recommends that your system disk be structured in ODS-5 format unless you use software that requires ODS-2. A brief comparison of ODS-2 and ODS-5, including advantages and disadvantages, follows this note.

Note also that although WBEM Services for OpenVMS can be installed on an ODS-2 disk, the WBEM Services for OpenVMS data repository requires an ODS-5 disk. A system disk in ODS-5 format can store everything; if you choose to have your disk in ODS-2 format, the procedure asks you to provide an ODS-5 disk for the data repository.

A brief summary of ODS-2 and ODS-5 file systems follows; for more information, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

  • ODS-2

    ODS-2 allows for compatibility with OpenVMS VAX and Alpha systems that use ODS-2 disks (as well as OpenVMS I64 systems using ODS-2 disks). Choose ODS-2 if you do not need the new features of ODS-5 disks, including the support of applications ported from other operating systems (such as UNIX, Linux, and MS Windows) available with ODS-5 disks.

  • ODS-5

    • ODS-5 supports file names that are longer and have a wider range of legal characters. This feature permits use of file names similar to those in a Windows or UNIX environment.

    • ODS-5 supports hard links to files, access dates, and files whose names differ only by case.

    • ODS-5 volumes cannot be mounted on any version of OpenVMS prior to Version 7.2.

    • Systems running OpenVMS VAX Version 7.2 and higher can mount ODS-5 volumes but cannot create or access files that have extended names. (On OpenVMS VAX systems, lowercase file name characters are seen in uppercase.)

If you choose not to change to ODS-5, the upgrade continues and the target disk is mounted. For example:

Do you want to convert the target system disk to ODS-5? (Yes/No/?)  NO

...OpenVMS I64 will be upgraded on DKB400:.

If you choose to change to ODS-5, you are given the option to enable hard links. (For more information about hard links, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.) The upgrade then continues.

Do you want to convert the target system disk to ODS-5? (Yes/No/?) YES

  DKB400: has been converted to ODS-5.

  You can use the BACKUP/CONVERT command to convert ODS-5 disks back
  to ODS-2 format. For more information, refer to the OpenVMS System
  Management Utilities Reference Manual.

  Hard links can be enabled on ODS-5 disks. WBEM Services for OpenVMS
  does not require hard links. (? for more information)
  (***Enabling hard links can take from 5-10 minutes to an hour or more.***)

Do you want to enable hard links? (Yes/No/?)  YES

If you choose to enable hard links, the procedure automatically executes an ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE/REPAIR operation to correctly set the reference (link) counts. ANALYZE/DISK/REPAIR counts the number of directory entries that reference each file, and sets the link count if it is incorrect. This operation can take from 5 to 10 minutes to an hour or more, depending on the complexity of the system disk configuration, the number of layered products installed, and the number of user files. During the process, messages similar to the following are displayed:

  Hard links have been enabled on DKB400:.
    
  The newly enabled hard links are not correct and need to be updated.
  The Analyze/Disk_Structure utility will now be run to do this.

  This can take from 5 - 10 minutes to an hour or more.  It is a normal
  requirement when hard links are enabled on an existing disk.

%ANALDISK-I-COUNT, 1000 hard link updates completed 
%ANALDISK-I-COUNT, 2000 hard link updates completed 
%ANALDISK-I-COUNT, 3000 hard link updates completed 
%ANALDISK-I-COUNT, 4000 hard link updates completed 
%ANALDISK-I-COUNT, 5000 hard link updates completed 
%ANALDISK-I-COUNT, 6000 hard link updates completed

  OpenVMS I64 will be upgraded on DKB400:.

Choosing Whether to Allow the Procedure to Create and Validate Boot Options (I64 only)

On OpenVMS I64 upgrades, the procedure next asks whether you want to create or validate boot options.

   Boot options in the EFI Boot Manager boot option menu can provide a
   convenient way to boot your system.   The installation procedure can
   automatically create a new boot option (if none exists) or validate
   existing boot options.

Do you want to create or validate boot options? (Yes/No) [Yes] YES

If your system disk will normally be booted on this system and this device, and if you want the upgrade procedure to assist you in setting up or validating boot options on the EFI console in the EFI Boot Manager menu, answer YES. The procedure creates and validates a new boot option if one does not exist, or it validates existing boot options, just before the upgrade completes. (See Section .)

If you answer YES and no boot option exists, the procedure allows you to set OpenVMS boot flags (VMS_FLAGS), as shown in the following example. Enter the OpenVMS flags (for example, 0,1), or press Enter to set no flags (the default). If a boot option exists, you can change boot flags after the upgrade completes (for information about changing boot flags, see Section ).

   You can set VMS_FLAGS or accept the default, 0,0.

Enter the value for VMS_FLAGS: (n.n) [0,0]

If you do not want the procedure to assist you in setting up or validating boot options on the EFI console, answer NO.

HP recommends that you allow the procedure to assist you in setting up and validating boot options.

Note:

If your newly upgraded system disk is a Fibre Channel device, HP recommends that you add it as a boot option in the EFI boot menu. If you do not allow the upgrade procedure to add the device to the boot menu, you can add it by using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM) after the upgrade completes. (To add Fibre Channel devices to the EFI boot menu, you must use this utility instead of EFI.)

HP recommends using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility to add shadowed system disks in a multiple-member shadow set to the EFI boot device list and dump device list. Be sure to add all members to both lists.

For information about the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility, see Section . For more information about configuring and booting Fibre Channel devices, see Appendix E.

Warning About Removal of the DECRAM Command

When upgrading from versions of OpenVMS prior to 8.3, the procedure displays a message similar to the following that warns you that the DCL command DECRAM is being removed to prevent conflict with the DECRYPT command:

Beginning with OpenVMS V8.3, the DCL commands ENCRYPT and DECRYPT
are provided as part of OpenVMS.

Because "DECRYPT" conflicts with the existing command "DECRAM",
this upgrade will remove the DECRAM command.

If you use the command DECRAM interactively or in command
procedures, please see the release notes for more information.

The DECRYPT command (introduced with OpenVMS Version 8.3) overwrites the default definition of DECR, which you might have been using to run DECram. You should update any command procedures that use the DECRAM command so that they use the foreign command style of DCL to run DECram:

$ DECRAM == "$MDMANAGER"

This change affects only the use of the DCL command; all other aspects of the DECram product remain the same.

Setting OpenVMS Cluster Membership Information

The procedure now asks whether your system will be part of an OpenVMS Cluster. For example:

Will this system be a member of an OpenVMS Cluster? (Yes/No)

Unlike an installation, answering YES to this question does not cause the SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG.COM procedure to run automatically when your upgraded system is first booted. However, correct cluster membership information is required by the upgrade procedure. Note that you can run run this procedure manually to configure or reconfigure your system as a member of an OpenVMS Cluster. For more information about configuring a member of an OpenVMS Cluster, see Guidelines for OpenVMS Cluster Configurations.

Setting OpenVMS Galaxy Information (Alpha Only)

The procedure next asks whether your system is an instance in an OpenVMS Galaxy. The display is similar to the following:

Will this system be an instance in an OpenVMS Galaxy? (Yes/No)

If you answer YES to this question, and you also answered YES to the OpenVMS Cluster question, then information about required remedial kits is displayed. Your answer to this question determines how the system parameter GALAXY is set.

Updating Time Zone Information

For local time zone support to work correctly, the time zone that accurately describes the location you want to be considered as your default time zone must be set. In addition, your system must be configured correctly to use a valid OpenVMS time differential factor (TDF).

If the installation procedure determines that time zone information is incomplete, it prompts you to set the correct default time zone and TDF for your system. For information about setting the time zone information, see Section .

For more information about TDF and local time zone support, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Upgrading Windowing, Networking, and Related Products

The procedure now presents information about the optional DECwindows GUI (DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS) and networking (DECnet and TCP/IP) products that will be upgraded along with the OpenVMS operating system. As noted by the procedure, you can change the default values for these products later in the installation procedure.

Note:

The following display shows what you might see during an OpenVMS I64 installation. Some of the products listed are supported on OpenVMS I64 systems only.

    The following products are part of the OpenVMS installation;
    if necessary they will be installed or upgraded along with the OpenVMS operating system:

      o Availability Manager (base) for OpenVMS I64
      o CDSA for OpenVMS I64 
      o KERBEROS for OpenVMS I64
      o SSL for OpenVMS I64
      o Performance Data Collector (base) for OpenVMS I64
      o WBEM Services for OpenVMS (WBEMCIM)
      o WBEM Providers for OpenVMS (WBEMPROVIDERS

    If necessary, the following optional products will also be upgraded
    along with the OpenVMS operating system:

      o DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS I64
      o DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS I64
      o DECnet Phase IV for OpenVMS I64
      o HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS

    If you want to add or delete optional products, you can do so later
    in the upgrade by answering NO to the following question:

        "Do you want the defaults for all product options?"    

    Availability Manager (base) for OpenVMS I64
    is already installed on your system. An upgrade is not required.

    CDSA for OpenVMS I64 ...
    is installed on your system. It will be upgraded.

    KERBEROS for OpenVMS I64...
    is installed on your system. It will be upgraded.

    SSL for OpenVMS I64...
    is installed on your system. An upgrade is not required.

    Performance Data Collector (base) for OpenVMS I64...
    is installed on your system. It will be upgraded.

    DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS I64 V1.6
    is installed on your system. An upgrade is not required.

    Beginning with OpenVMS V7.1, the DECnet-Plus kit is provided with
    the OpenVMS operating system kit.  HP strongly recommends that
    DECnet users install DECnet-Plus.  DECnet Phase IV applications are
    supported by DECnet-Plus.

    DECnet Phase IV is also provided as an option.

    If you install DECnet-Plus and TCP/IP you can run DECnet
    applications over a TCP/IP network.  Please see OpenVMS
    Management Guide for information on running DECnet over TCP/IP.

    Do you want to install DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS I64 V8.3-1H1? (Yes/No) [Yes]

    HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS
    is already installed on your system. An upgrade is not required.

    WBEM Services for OpenVMS (WBEMCIM)
    is installed on your system. It will be upgraded.

    WBEM Providers for OpenVMS (WBEMPROVIDERS) 
    is installed on your system. It will be upgraded.

Note:

Beginning with OpenVMS Version 8.3, DECwindows client files are made available through the DWMOTIF_SUPPORT kit. (Prior to Version 8.3, the client files were included directly with the OpenVMS operating system kit.) The OpenVMS installation procedure installs this kit automatically. The DWMOTIF_SUPPORT kit name is listed during the installation.

Required versions of some of the windowing and networking products might already be installed on the system. If so, you will see a message to this effect, as seen for most of the products in the previous example. For some of the windowing and networking products, earlier versions might be installed that still work on OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1. In this case, you will see a message indicating the software is already installed and asking whether you want to install the newer version. You can keep the currently installed version or upgrade to the newer version supplied with OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1. If you choose to keep the currently installed version, you should verify what level of support for this version is available from HP.

Some windowing and networking products might have versions installed that do not work on OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1. In this case, you are not given a choice to upgrade—the software is upgraded automatically. (On OpenVMS Alpha upgrades, if older versions of SSL for OpenVMS are found, the procedure removes them.)

Note:

For support of Instant Capacity (iCAP) and Pay per use (PPU) functionality (supported on cell-based Integrity servers), and for support of such products as gWLM and HP SIM, install TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS. When you provision OpenVMS on Integrity servers, TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS is installed automatically.

Completing the Upgrade

The following sections describe the remaining steps that you need to perform to complete the upgrade.

Choosing Descriptive Help Text

The procedure next prompts you as follows:

    The installation operation can provide brief or detailed descriptions.
    In either case, you can request the detailed descriptions by typing ?.

Do you always want detailed descriptions? (Yes/No) [No]  

If you answer YES, the procedure displays additional explanatory text with each prompt.

Removing Older Versions of ENCRYPT

Beginning with OpenVMS Version 8.3, Encryption for OpenVMS is included with the operating system. If an older version of ENCRYPT (HP I64VMS ENCRYPT or HP AXPVMS ENCRYPT) is found on your system, the upgrade procedure removes the product. Confirmation of the removal of the ENCRYPT product is displayed, as in the following example:

       HP I64VMS ENCRYPT will now be removed.
       This is required because OpenVMS now includes ENCRYPT.

   The following product has been selected:
       HP I64VMS ENCRYPT V1.6                 Layered Product

   The following product will be removed from destination:
       HP I64VMS ENCRYPT V1.6                 DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
 
   Portion done: 0%...20%...30%...40%...50%...60%...70%...80%...90%...100%

   The following product has been removed:
       HP I64VMS ENCRYPT V1.6                 Layered Product

Secure Delivery Validation

As of Version 8.3, most PCSI kits included on the OpenVMS distribution media are signed using Secure Delivery. Each target file includes an associated digital signature file (also referred to as a manifest) that is used for Secure Delivery validation. This validation involves authenticating the originator (HP, in this case) and verifying the contents of the target file. (The digital signature file has the same file name as the target file plus _ESW appended to the file extension, as in filename.PCSI$COMPRESSED_ESW.) When you upgrade OpenVMS I64 from the distribution media, the procedure validates any PCSI kits that are being installed. For each kit successfully validated, you see a message similar to the following:

Performing product kit validation of signed kits...
%PCSI-I-VALPASSED, validation of
DKB400:[KITS.CDSA]HP-I64VMS-CDSA-Vnnnn-nnn-n.PCSI$COMPRESSED;1 succeeded
    .
    .
    .

Note that because of limitations in the OpenVMS Alpha CD boot environment, OpenVMS Alpha kits are not validated when booted from it. On both OpenVMS Alpha and I64 systems, signed Signed PCSI kits that are installed subsequent to the initial boot of the OpenVMS kit (including signed kits on the distribution media) are validated. In addition, on both OpenVMS Alpha and OpenVMS I64 systems, the DCL command PRODUCT SHOW HISTORY displays the validation status of installed products.

Saving Archived Files

By default, the OpenVMS upgrade deletes files that were archived as filename.type_OLD by OpenVMS remedial kits. If you do not want to delete these files, you can save them by performing one of the following actions:

  • When the script asks whether you want the defaults for all options, answer NO. (This script is shown in the example in Section .) Step through the options and answer NO to the option for deleting files archived by remedial kits. This action saves all such files.

  • Before beginning the upgrade, rename any _OLD files that you want to save. Files that you do not rename are deleted.

Note that the upgrade does not delete all files with a file extension ending in _OLD. Rather, it deletes only those _OLD files that were archived by OpenVMS remedial kits.

Note:

OpenVMS patches save these _OLD files in VMS$REMEDIAL_OLD_FILES.TXT in the SYS$UPDATE directory. All files listed in this file are supposed to have _OLD appended to their names; however, some patch kits add the files without this extension. If the upgrade procedure detects files without _OLD appended, it displays a message similar to the following:

%UPGRADE-I-FIXUP, appending _OLD to file names in   
 PCSI$DESTINATION:[SYSUPD] VMS$REMEDIAL_OLD_FILES.TXT
    [SYSUPD]VMSKITBLD.DAT
    [SYSHLP]XFC$SDA.HLP
    [SYS$LDR]SYSTEM_SYNCHRONIZATION.EXE-OLD
    [SYS$LDR]SYS$XFCACHE.DSF
    [SYS$LDR]SHELL9K.EXE_STB
    [000000]HP-I64VMS-VMS-V0820-1-2.PCSI$DESCRIPTION

Selecting Product Component Options

As you begin the upgrade procedure, the procedure asks whether you want all the default values (meaning all the files and subgroups of files for each component included in the operating system). The display is similar to the following:

The following product has been selected:
    HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1             Platform (product suite) 
 

Configuration phase starting ...

You will be asked to choose options, if any, for each selected product and for
any products that may be installed to satisfy software dependency requirements.
 
HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1: OPENVMS and related products Platform
 
   COPYRIGHT 1976, 30-Aug-2007

   Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
 
Do you want the defaults for all options? [YES] 

During an upgrade, the PCSI utility defines default values as the values that you selected when you last installed or upgraded the OpenVMS operating system on your system. Therefore, before you respond to the prompt, note the following:

  • If you accept the default values, you receive the same components that you selected when you last installed or upgraded the system (instead of all the components currently available) plus any new components that were not in the previous version of the OpenVMS operating system.

  • If you want to include or exclude any components differently than you did in the last installation or upgrade, you must answer NO and then respond to the prompts for each option, even those that you are not changing.

  • If you want to review the current defaults first, answer NO. Then answer YES when the procedure asks whether you want to view the values.

    If you review the defaults and are satisfied, answer YES to the prompt asking whether you are satisfied with the values. If you want to make changes, answer NO to that question and then answer YES when the procedure asks whether you want to reenter the values.

When you select component options, also note the following:

  • Whether you choose all the default values or select individual files, the procedure allows you to view your selections and make changes.

  • If you are not sure whether you want certain component options, you can request help by entering a question mark (?) at the prompt for that component (or group of components).

  • You should review the list of options and compare them with the requirements for your procedure. If you are selecting components individually, be sure that you include all components necessary to support the needs of your users. Note also that certain components depend upon the installation of other components.

  • OpenVMS Management Station software is installed automatically on your OpenVMS system disk when you accept all the default values. If you do not accept the default values, you must select the OpenVMS Management Station component (server and client files) if you plan to use that product. After the upgrade is complete, you can then prepare your OpenVMS system and your PC to run OpenVMS Management Station by following the procedures described in Appendix H.

  • If you decide after the upgrade to change which OpenVMS operating system components you want installed on your system, you must reconfigure the installation as described in Section .

  • After you boot the upgraded system disk and log in, you can obtain information about individual system files by entering HELP SYSTEM_FILES at the dollar sign prompt ($).

Note:

Unless you have specific reasons to do otherwise, HP recommends that you accept the defaults and install all OpenVMS options. OpenVMS and layered products have various dependencies on many of these options. Even if you think you do not need certain options, some OpenVMS or layered product operations might not work correctly if other OpenVMS options are not installed.

If you answer YES to accept the defaults for all options, the procedure displays a message similar to the following, the contents of which depend on the products you chose to install. If you answer NO, the procedure prompts you for each option and suboption.

Availability Manager (base) for OpenVMS I64

CDSA for OpenVMS I64 

KERBEROS for OpenVMS I64 

SSL for OpenVMS I64 

Performance Data Collector (base) for OpenVMS I64 

WBEM Services for OpenVMS (WBEMCIM)

WBEM Providers for OpenVMS (WBEMPROVIDERS)

For a list of component options included with the OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 operating system, see Example 3.1.

Component and Product Installation Confirmation Messages

When you have answered all the prompts and selected the components you want installed, the procedure allows you to review your selections and make changes, and then displays information about the various components and products that were installed, as shown in the following sample display in which the review is not chosen. You might see an %UPGRADE-I-FIXUP message, which indicates that obsolete files on the system were incorrectly saved by remedial kits. The "fixup" allows them to be correctly removed.

Note:

If you perform two installations at the same time to OpenVMS Alpha systems connected via MEMORY CHANNEL, you might see a message similar to the following every 5 seconds:

%PMA0 CPU00: 30-AUG-2004 14:58:40 Remote System Conflicts with 
Known System - REMOTE NODE
%PMA0 CPU00: 30-AUG-2004 14:58:45 Remote System Conflicts with 
Known System - REMOTE NODE

Disregard the message. The installation or upgrade will proceed normally and the messages will not be present when the system reboots with its real node name. The version numbers in this example do not necessarily reflect the version numbers of the products actually shipped with OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1.

Do you want to review the options? [NO] NO

Execution phase starting ...

The following products will be installed to destinations:
    HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306                DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3-1H1         DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152            DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1             DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS VMS V8.3-1H1                 DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728        DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31        DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    
The following products will be removed from destinations:
    HP I64VMS CDSA V2.2                    DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3             DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.0                DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3                 DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]
    HP I64VMS VMS V8.3                     DISK$I640831H1:[VMS$COMMON.]

Portion done: 0%..10%..20%..30%..40%..50%..60%..70%..80%..90%..100% 
     
The following products have been installed:
    HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3-306                Layered Product
    HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.3-1H1         Layered Product
    HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152            Layered Product
    HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1             Platform (product suite)
    HP I64VMS VMS V8.3-1H1                 Operating System
    HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61-A070728........Layered Product
    HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5-31........Layered Product

The following products have been removed:
    HP I64VMS CDSA V2.2                    Layered Product
    HP I64VMS DECNET_PLUS V8.2             Layered Product
    HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.0                Layered Product
    HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3                 Platform (product suite)
    HP I64VMS VMS V8.3                     Operating System
                
HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1: OPENVMS and related products Platform
  
   HP I64VMS KERBEROS V3.1-152   

      Configure and set up Kerberos 
 
      If Kerberos will be run on this system, but has not been
      used previously, you need to perform the following steps.
      
      o Run the Kerberos cofniguration procedure:
      
        @SYS$STARTUP:KRB$CONFIGURE.COM            

      o Add the following line to SYS$MANAGER:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM:
        
        $ @SYS$STARTUP:KRB$STARTUP

      o Add the following line to SYS$MANAGER:SYLOGIN.COM:

        $ @SYS$MANAGER:KRB$SYMBOLS

     
Press RETURN to continue:

Upgrade Creates and Validates Boot Options (I64 Only)

At this point in an OpenVMS I64 upgrade, the procedure creates and validates boot options if you chose to have the procedure do so (see Section ).

  • If you answered NO , the following message is displayed

    If there is an existing boot option that was used to boot this
    system disk, you may be able to use it. Otherwise, you will have
    to use the EFI Shell the first time that you boot the newly
    installed system. After booting, use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager
    to create a Boot Option. To do this log in to a privileged
    account and execute this command:
    
       $ @SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS

    The procedure then informs you that the upgrade is complete and prompts you to press Return (Enter) to continue, at which point it returns you to the OpenVMS main menu. You can select option 8 (“Execute DCL commands and procedures”) on the OpenVMS main menu and enter the command at the DCL triple dollar sign prompt ($$$) to start the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility.

  • If you answered YES, the procedure determines whether a boot entry already exists for the system disk (in this example, DKB400:):

    • If an entry is found, a message similar to the following is displayed:

          The EFI Boot Manager menu includes the following boot option(s)
          for DKB400:
      
      Validate EFI Boot Options list:    Timeout = 0 secs.
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
       1 DKB400 PCI(0|20|1|0)  Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)  "OpenVMS on DKB400: PKA0.1"
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      1 entries found.

      In this example, one boot option is found. If multiple entries are found and if they are all SCSI devices, the procedure displays the following message and then notifies you that the upgrade is complete:

      
         The EFI Boot Manager menu includes multiple Boot Options for $1$DGA1200:
         Boot Options cannot be created or validated automatically.
      
         Please use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager to ensure that you 
         have a valid boot option for the system you have just installed.

      When one entry is found, or when multiple Fibre Channel entries are found, the procedure validates the boot options, as in the following example, in which the found entry fails to boot and is then fixed and validated:

      Validate EFI Boot Options list:    Timeout = 0 secs.
      -------------------------------------------------------------------
         1 DKB400: PKA0.1
               DKB400 PCI(0|20|1|0) Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)  
               efi$bcfg: Option Failed. Fixing Boot Entry automatically.
              
      efi$bcfg: Entry 1 Boot0001 removed.
      efi$bcfg: DKB400 PCI(0|20|1|0) Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)  (Boot0001) Option
      successfully added 
      -----------------------------------------------------------------------
      1 entries validated.
    • If no existing entry is found, a boot option is created and the procedure displays validation text as in the following example:

      efi$bcfg: DKB400: (Boot0003)  Option successfully added
      
          The Boot Option is called OpenVMS on DKB400:;
          it is the first entry in the Boot Options menu, and is
          configured (by default) to boot from SYS0.
      
      VMS_FLAGS are set to -fl 0,0

Upgrade Completes and Returns to OpenVMS Operating System Menu

The upgrade procedure is now complete. The procedure displays information about the special startup procedure that runs when the newly installed system is first booted. It then prompts you to press Return (Enter) to continue. After you do so, you are returned to the OpenVMS operating system menu. The following is a sample display:

  The upgrade is now complete.

  When the newly upgraded system is first booted, a special
  startup procedure will be run.  This procedure will:

    o  Run AUTOGEN to set system parameters.
    o  Reboot the system with the newly set parameters.


  You may shut down now or continue with other operations.

   Process I64VMS_INSTALL logged out at 25-JUL-2007 14:45:49.54

Press Return to continue...

  ****************************************************************

  You can install or upgrade the OpenVMS I64 operating system
  or you can install or upgrade layered products that are included
  on the OpenVMS I64 distribution media (CD/DVD).
    
  You can also execute DCL commands and procedures to perform
  "standalone" tasks, such as backing up the system disk.
    
  Please choose one of the following:

    1)  Upgrade, install or reconfigure OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1
    2)  Display layered products that this procedure can install
    3)  Install or upgrade layered products
    4)  Show installed products
    5)  Reconfigure installed products
    6)  Remove installed products
    7)  Find, Install or Undo patches; Show or Delete recovery data
    8)   Execute DCL commands and procedures
    9)   Shut down this system      

Enter CHOICE or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/?)

Shutting Down the System

Unless you want to perform any other operations prior to booting the upgraded disk, shut the system down by choosing the shutdown option (9) on the menu:

Enter CHOICE or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/?)  9
    Shutting down the system
       .
       .
       .

         SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE

What to Do After Shutdown

After an OpenVMS Alpha system shuts down, you can make the newly upgraded system disk the default boot device, if necessary, and then boot the system disk. After an OpenVMS I64 system shuts down, you can use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility to add and validate a boot option for the newly upgraded system disk, and then boot the newly upgraded system disk. For either operating system, AUTOGEN runs automatically, after which the system shuts down again and automatically reboots. If you are doing a concurrent or rolling upgrade in an OpenVMS Cluster environment, do not boot any other cluster members now.

Now go to Chapter 7 and check for any postupgrade tasks that need to be performed before the system and cluster can be used. Once you have completed all required postupgrade tasks, you can reboot and then use other cluster members.

Chapter 7 After Installing or Upgrading the OpenVMS Operating System

Contents

Postinstallation and Postupgrade Tasks
Backing Up Your System Disk
Registering Your Licenses
Set System Parameters for Volume Shadowing (New Installations Only; Optional)
Tuning BAP System Parameters (Alpha Upgrade Only)
Running AUTOGEN to Set System Parameter Changes
Forming the Shadow Set
Customizing the System (New Installations, Some Upgrades)
Creating Network Proxy Authorization Files
Setting Up the Queue Manager and Default Queues
Configuring a Multihead System (Optional)
Configuring DECnet
Configuring HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS
Installing and Configuring Third-Party Networking Software
Initializing or Configuring Other Installed Components
Initializing CDSA (Optional)
Configuring the Availability Manager Base Software (Optional)
Configuring Kerberos (Optional)
Configuring SSL for OpenVMS (Optional)
Configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS (Optional; I64 only)
Configure WBEM Providers for OpenVMS (Optional; I64 only)
Configure the Instant Capacity Software (Optional; I64 only)
Configure the Pay per use Software (Optional; I64 only)
Configure HP SIM (Optional; I64 only)
Initializing and Running the Performance Data Collector Base Software (Optional)
Preparing to Use OpenVMS Management Station (Optional)
Installing OpenVMS Debugger Clients on a PC (Optional)
Creating a System-Specific Login Welcome Message (Optional)
Examining Your Command Procedures (Upgrades Only)
Adding and Removing Operating System Files (Optional)
Expanding the System Libraries (Optional; OpenVMS Alpha Only)Compressing the System Libraries (Optional, OpenVMS I64: Not Recommended)
Installing Patches (Optional but Recommended)
Installing and Configuring Layered Products (New Installations, Some Upgrades)
Alternative Procedure
Reinstall DECevent Software (Alpha Upgrades only; optional)
Creating Print Queues (New Installations, Some Upgrades)
Updating SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM to Start Layered Products and Print Queues
Creating Accounts (New Installations, Some Upgrades)
Testing the System with UETP (Optional)
Backing Up the Customized System Disk and Initiating Systematic Backups
Reforming the Shadow Set as Final Postupgrade Backup
Rebooting Cluster Members (Upgrades Only)
Running AUTOGEN to Tune the System
Modifying System Parameters
General Notes About Modifying System Parameters
Modifying System Parameters After an Upgrade

After you have installed or upgraded the OpenVMS operating system, you must perform several important tasks to prepare the system for operation. Section  includes a checklist that you can use to make sure you perform all the postinstallation or postupgrade tasks necessary for your system.

Postinstallation and Postupgrade Tasks

Use the checklist in Table 7.1 to ensure that you perform all necessary postinstallation or postupgrade tasks. Unless indicated otherwise, these tasks are applicable as both postinstallation and postupgrade tasks.

Postinstallation and Postupgrade Checklist

 TaskSection

For a newly installed system disk, you can back up the disk. (At this point, you could reinstall OpenVMS onto the disk instead.)

For a newly upgraded system disk, if it is not going to be a shadow set member, back up the system disk as a safeguard before proceeding with the next steps. If your newly upgraded system disk is going to be a shadow set member, you can re-form it in a later step. As an optional precaution, you can back up the system disk as well.

Section 
Register any licenses that were not registered during the installation; for an upgrade, register any new licenses.Section 
New installations only (optional): Set system parameters to enable volume shadowing.Section 
Alpha upgrades only: Tune BAP system parameters.Section 
If you set system parameters to enable volume shadowing or removed hardcoded BAP system parameters, run AUTOGEN and reboot. Section 
If you want to form a shadow set for a newly installed system disk, you can do this now or later. If you upgraded a disk in a volume shadowing environment, re-form the shadow set. Section 
New installations, some upgrades: Perform the following tasks that generally apply to new installations only but could also apply after an upgrade: 
 

Create proxy files, if required.

Section 

 

Set up the queue manager and start the default batch and print queues.

Section 

 
Configure a multihead system, if applicable.Section 
 

Configure DECnet if it was installed. After an upgrade, perform only if DECnet was added during the upgrade.

Section 

 
Configure TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS if it was installed. After an upgrade, configure TCP/IP Services only if it was added during the upgrade.Section 
 

If you are using neither DECnet nor TCP/IP Services, install and configure third-party networking software, if necessary. Networking software is required to download patches and for certain layered products.

Section 

Initialize or configure the following products, as needed: 
 
Initialize CDSA.Section 
 
Configure Availability Manager.Section 
 
Configure Kerberos.Section 
 
Configure SSL for OpenVMS.Section 
 
On Integrity servers using services that depend on WBEM Services for OpenVMS, configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS.Section 
 
On Integrity servers using services that depend on WBEM Providers, configure WBEM Providers for OpenVMS.Section 
 
On Integrity servers that use Instant Capacity (iCAP) or Temporary Instant Capacity (TiCAP), or Global Instant Capacity (GiCAP), configure the iCAP software.Section 
 
On Integrity servers that use Pay per use (PPU), configure the PPU software.Section 
 
On Integrity servers that use HP SIM services, configure HP SIM.Section 
 
Initialize and run the Performance Data Collector base software (TDC_RT).Section 
 
Prepare your OpenVMS system and your PC to run OpenVMS Management Station, and follow procedures in Appendix H.Section 
 
Install OpenVMS Debugger clients on a PC.Section 
Create or edit a system-specific or clusterwide login welcome message SYS$MANAGER:WELCOME.TXT (optional).Section 
Upgrades only: Examine command procedures for which the upgrade may have provided new template files.Section 
Add and remove operating system files (optional).Section 

Alpha only:Expand the system libraries using LIBDECOMP.COM (optional).

I64 only:If necessary, compress the system libraries using LIBDECOMP.COM (optional, HP recommends keeping libraries in expanded format).

Section 
Download and apply any relevant OpenVMS or networking patches that are available (optional but recommended).Section 
New installations, some upgrades: Install and configure layered products.Section 

Alpha upgrades only (optional): Reinstall optional DECevent software (which is automatically removed during an upgrade)

Section 

New installations, some upgrades: Create print queues.Section 
Update SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM to have layered products, print queues, and other products or devices start at boot.Section 
Installations and possibly upgrades: Create user accounts.Section 
Run the User Environment Test Package (UETP) to test the system (optional).Section 
Back up the system disk and start a systematic routine for backing up the application, data, and user disks.Section 
If the system disk was pulled out of the shadow set and all the appropriate postupgrade steps recommended in this chapter thus far were performed on that disk, then re-form the shadow set once again.Section 
Upgrades only: Reboot cluster members, if applicable.Section 
Tune your operating system: After the system has run for at least 24 hours with users or a typical application workload on the system, run AUTOGEN to collect feedback. If necessary, modify the MODPARAMS.DAT file.

Section 

Section 

Backing Up Your System Disk

Unless your newly installed or upgraded system disk will be part of a shadow set, HP recommends that you back up the system disk before performing the tasks described in this chapter. If you encounter problems while performing any of these tasks, having a backup copy of the system disk ensures that you can restore it to a known condition without having to repeat the installation or upgrade.

If your system disk will be part of a multiple-member shadow set, then a backup is not necessary. Either form or re-form the shadow set, as described in Section ; this creates a backup copy of the newly installed or upgraded system disk through the shadow copy operation. Remember to dismount any added shadow set members after the shadow copy has completed, complete any steps described in this chapter that you need to perform and, when you are finished, re-form the shadow set.

If your newly installed or upgraded system disk will not be in a shadow set, back up the system disk by performing the following steps. (For a newly installed system disk, it might be just as easy to reinstall the operating system.)

  1. Shut down the system (for OpenVMS Alpha systems, described in Section ; for OpenVMS I64 systems, as described in Section ).

  2. Boot the operating system media, as described in Section .

  3. Use the OpenVMS operating system menu to enter the DCL environment (option 8).

  4. Mount the system device and the target device on which you are making the backup copy. (If you are backing up to tape, skip to the next step.) For example, if your system disk is on DKA0: and the target device is on DKA100:, you might use the following commands (colons are required). The /OVERRIDE qualifier used in this example enables you to mount the system disk without entering its volume label. The /FOREIGN qualifier is required for the target disk when you use the BACKUP /IMAGE command.

    $$$ MOUNT /OVERRIDE=IDENTIFICATION DKA0:
    $$$ MOUNT /FOREIGN DKA100:
    $$$ BACKUP /IMAGE /LOG DKA0: DKA100:
  5. To back up the system disk to a magnetic tape, enter the following commands, where MTA0: is the magnetic tape drive and label is the volume label. Note that the BACKUP command automatically mounts the tape and begins the backup to it.

    $$$ INITIALIZE MTA0: label
    $$$ MOUNT /OVERRIDE=IDENTIFICATION DKA0:
    $$$ BACKUP /IMAGE /LOG DKA0: MTA0:label.BCK

    The /IMAGE qualifier causes the Backup utility to produce a functionally equivalent copy of the system disk, which is also bootable. The /LOG qualifier causes the procedure to display the specification of each save set file being processed. To compare the backed up files to the source files, use the /VERIFY qualifier. If any discrepancies are detected, the Backup utility displays an error message.

  6. Log out from the DCL environment.

  7. Shut down the system by selecting option 9 on the menu.

  8. Boot from the disk on which you either upgraded or installed OpenVMS.

In addition to backing up the system disk now before you customize it, you should back up your system disk again after you successfully complete your customization tasks and install layered products.

For more complete information about backup operations, including a description of an alternative method that does not require booting from the operating system media and that enables you to back up a shadowed disk without disabling the shadow set, see Appendix F. For more information about the Backup utility, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: A-L.

Registering Your Licenses

If you did not register your OpenVMS licenses during the installation, you must do so before you can use the OpenVMS operating system. You must also register the licenses for OpenVMS layered products. If your operating system came preinstalled, you must register licenses. The licenses are not preinstalled. If you plan to form a volume shadow set for your newly installed system disk, you must enter and load the VOLSHAD license.

If you have upgraded your operating system, register any new OpenVMS or layered product licenses. Note that licensing schemes differ between OpenVMS Alpha and I64 systems. For OpenVMS I64 systems, a single OE license grants the right to use all the components bundled in the purchased OE. Each OE is offered with Per Core Licenses (PCLs).

For information about registering licenses, see the following documents:

  • HP OpenVMS License Management Utility Manual

  • HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes and the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes

  • For OpenVMS I64 systems, the HP Operating Environments for OpenVMS for Integrity Servers Software Product Description (SPD 82.34.xx).

To register licenses, use the OpenVMS License utility as follows:

  1. Start the OpenVMS License utility by entering the following command at the OpenVMS system prompt. (You can also use the LICENSE REGISTER command.)

    $ @SYS$UPDATE:VMSLICENSE
  2. The utility displays a menu screen similar to the following. Select the REGISTER option (press Enter or enter 1 at the prompt), and enter each license key until you have successfully registered all required PAKs.

       VMS License Management Utility Options:
         
           1. REGISTER a Product Authorization Key
           2. AMEND an existing Product Authorization Key
           3. CANCEL an existing Product Authorization Key
           4. LIST Product Authorization Keys
           5. MODIFY an existing Product Authorization Key
           6. DISABLE an existing Product Authorization Key
           7. DELETE an existing Product Authorization Key
           8. COPY an existing Product Authorization Key
           9. MOVE an existing Product Authorization Key
          10. ENABLE an existing Product Authorization Key
          11. SHOW the licenses loaded on this node
          12. SHOW the unit requirements for this node
             
          99. Exit this procedure
    
          Type '?' at any prompt for a description of the information 
          requested. Press Ctrl/Z at any prompt to return to this menu.
         
    Enter one of the above choices [1]
  3. After each license is successfully registered, the procedure asks whether the license should be loaded. Answer YES.

  4. After you have registered and loaded all your licenses, exit the License Management procedure by entering option 99.

Set System Parameters for Volume Shadowing (New Installations Only; Optional)

If you plan to form a shadowed system disk, you must add system parameters to the SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT file. Add the following lines to the bottom of the MODPARAMS.DAT file:

SHADOWING=2           !Enable volume shadowing
SHADOW_SYS_DISK=1     !Enable shadowing of the system disk
SHADOW_SYS_UNIT=n     !Optional: default is 0, which creates DSA0
SHADOW_MAX_COPY=4     !Allow up to 4 shadow copies or merges going on at the same time
ALLOCLASS=x           !This number must be non-zero;
                      !it must be used if local non-FC devices are going to be
                      !shadow set members

If a nonzero ALLOCLASS value is already in use for your system, do not change the ALLOCLASS value. For more information about these and other system parameters you can set for volume shadowing, see the HP Volume Shadowing for OpenVMS manual. For more information about setting ALLOCLASS for clusters, see the HP OpenVMS Cluster Systems manual.

Tuning BAP System Parameters (Alpha Upgrade Only)

OpenVMS Alpha Version 7.1 and later contains system parameters that control the operation of bus-addressable pool (BAP).

The CIPCA, CIXCD, KFMSB, and Qlogic ISP 1020 (KZPSM-AA) adapters are some of the adapters that use bus-addressable pool to improve performance. BAP is a non-paged dynamic, physical-address-filtered memory pool used to overcome I/O bus and 32-bit adapter physical addressing limits.

The following table lists the BAP system parameters and their default values:

System ParameterDefault Value

NPAG_BAP_MIN

0

NPAG_BAP_MAX

0

NPAG_BAP_MIN_PA

0

NPAG_BAP_MAX_PA

-1

The default values of these parameters enable the system to boot with any configuration. When AUTOGEN is run on a configured system, it resets these parameters to values that should enhance performance for the current system configuration.

If this is an upgrade of OpenVMS, or if the system fails to boot after a hardware change and displays a message that refers to incorrect BAP parameters, HP recommends that you perform the following steps:

  1. To begin the conversational boot, use the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    For device-name, substitute the device name of your system disk drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press the Enter key:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400
  2. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, enter the following:

    NPAG_BAP_MIN 0
    NPAG_BAP_MAX 0
    NPAG_BAP_MIN_PA 0
    NPAG_BAP_MAX_PA -1

  3. This should enable the system to boot. Once completed, enter the following command:

    $ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:AGEN$FEEDBACK.EXE
  4. The command entered in the preceding step creates a file that will contain the BAP values for the system in its current configuration. To see what they are, enter the following command (the BAP parameters in AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT do not include the NPAG_ prefix):

    $ SEARCH SYS$SYSTEM:AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT BAP
  5. Check MODPARAMS.DAT for any hardcoded BAP values by entering the following command:

    $ SEARCH SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT BAP

Important:

If any BAP parameters are defined in MODPARAMS.DAT, HP strongly recommends removing them. Their presence in MODPARAMS.DAT could be the source of the current boot problem or might be a source of one in the future if a change is made to the adapter card configuration in the system.

If you make changes to adapters in the future and the system boots successfully, immediately run AUTOGEN, by entering the following command:

$ @SYS$UPDATE:AUTOGEN GETDATA SETPARAMS NOFEEDBACK

Running AUTOGEN to Set System Parameter Changes

If you modified MODPARAMS.DAT to enable or modify shadowing parameters (see Section ), or if you removed hardcoded BAP system parameters (see Section ), then run AUTOGEN and reboot the system by performing the following steps. This makes the changes take effect.

  1. Run AUTOGEN by entering the following command:

    $ @SYS$UPDATE:AUTOGEN GETDATA TESTFILES NOFEEDBACK
  2. After AUTOGEN completes, display or print the SYS$SYSTEM:AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT file and review it. This file lists changes being made to SYSGEN parameters or changes that AUTOGEN wanted to make but could not because of a hardcoded or maximum value that was specified in MODPARAMS.DAT.

  3. If other changes need to be made to MODPARAMS.DAT based on a review of the AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT file, make them now and then resume at step 1.

  4. Once you are satisfied with the parameter settings, enter the following AUTOGEN command:

    $ @SYS$UPDATE:AUTOGEN GENPARAMS SETPARAMS NOFEEDBACK

    This command makes the parameter changes permanent so that they are used on subsequent reboots.

  5. Reboot the system by entering the following command:

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN

For more information about AUTOGEN, see HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: A-L.

Forming the Shadow Set

If you have upgraded a disk in a volume shadowing environment, you must now re-form the shadow set. If you want to form a shadow set for a newly installed system disk, you can do this now or later. To do so requires that the VOLSHAD license has been entered and loaded. In addition, you must set several system parameters, as explained in Section , and then you must run AUTOGEN and reboot the system, as explained in Section .

Forming the shadow set with the newly installed or upgraded disk as the master causes the other disks in the shadow set to be updated with a copy of the disk. (In a single-member shadow set, although no other disks exist to be updated, the shadow set can be used to facilitate replacement of a failed drive.)

After forming the shadow set, dismount one of the shadow set members and keep it as a backup. After you perform the steps recommended in this chapter, you can place another volume into the shadow set instead of doing the final backup, or re-add the volume that was dismounted.

Form the shadow set as follows:

  1. Enter the SHOW DEVICE D command to display a list of disks available on your system. For example:

    $ SHOW DEVICE D
    Device                Device     Error    Volume       Free  Trans Mnt
     Name                 Status     Count    Label       Blocks Count Cnt
    $11$DKB100:  (NODE1)  Online        0  
    $11$DKB200:  (NODE1)  Mounted       0     I640831H1   918150    1  31
  2. Enter a command in the following format:

    MOUNT/CONFIRM/SYSTEM DSAn: /SHADOW=(upgraded-disk:,new-member:) volume-label

    where:

    • DSAn: is the virtual unit name of the shadow set, where n is a unique number from 0 to 999.

    • upgraded-disk: is the name of the shadowed system disk on which you just upgraded or installed OpenVMS.

    • new-member: is the name of the disk you want to add as a member of the shadow set.

    • volume-label is the volume label of the shadow set you just upgraded or the disk you are creating.

    Note:

    When you form the shadow set, the contents of the new member are replaced by the contents of the disk you upgraded. Specifying the /CONFIRM qualifier reminds you of this fact, confirming that you are specifying the correct name of a disk that either is blank or contains files you no longer need.

Example

$ MOUNT/CONFIRM/SYSTEM DSA54: /SHADOW=($11$DKB200:,$11$DKB100:) I640831H1 

%MOUNT-F-SHDWCOPYREQ, shadow copy required 
Virtual Unit - DSA54 Volume label I64A0831H1
     Member                    Volume label Owner UIC
     $11$DKB100:  (NODE1)      SCRATCH      [100,100] 
Allow FULL shadow copy on the above member(s)? [N]: YES

Note:

Before continuing with the next step in this chapter, after the shadow copy completes, dismount one of the shadow set members to use as a backup. Normally, this should be the unit you just added to the upgraded volume when you formed the shadow set (in the preceding example, $11$DKB100:).

For OpenVMS I64, to add a shadowed system disk in a multiple-member shadow set to the EFI boot device list and dump device list, HP recommends using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM). Be sure to add all members to both lists.

Customizing the System (New Installations, Some Upgrades)

You can customize the system to meet your site-specific needs. In addition, if your Integrity server is part of an OpenVMS Cluster environment, you must prepare the cluster environment and configure the cluster. The following subsections describe the customization tasks you can perform at this time. In general, these tasks apply to new installations only; however, in some cases, they apply to upgrades. The tasks are as follows:

  1. Create network proxy authorization files (Section ).

  2. Set up the queue manager, configure shared files (when multiple system disks are present), and start the default batch and print queues (Section ).

  3. Configure your multihead system, if applicable (Section ).

  4. Configure DECnet if it was installed or added during an upgrade (Section ).

  5. Configure TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS if it was installed or added during an upgrade (Section ).

  6. If neither DECnet nor TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS is being used, install and configure third-party networking software, if necessary (Section ).

  7. Update SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM to have networking software (and, optionally, any other additional products you have installed) start at boot (Section ).

For instructions on customizing the system, review the following documentation:

  • The release notes, for notes and restrictions that might be relevant to your customization plans

  • The HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, for instructions on customizing and using your system

Note that other customization tasks are described later in this chapter.

Creating Network Proxy Authorization Files

After a new installation of OpenVMS that includes DECnet, or after an upgrade in which you have added DECnet, create your network proxy authorization files. These files include security authorization information for users using network proxy accounts. If you do not create these network authorization files before starting up your system, you might see messages such as the following during startup:

Message from user SYSTEM on HOMER
%SECSRV-E-NOPROXYDB, cannot find proxy database file NET$PROXY.DAT
%RMS-E-FNF, file not found

The NET$PROXY.DAT file is the primary network proxy authorization file. The other network authorization file to be created is NETPROXY.DAT. To create the network proxy authorization files, enter the following commands:

$ SET DEFAULT SYS$COMMON:[SYSEXE]
$ MC AUTHORIZE CREATE/PROXY
$ SET DEFAULT SYS$LOGIN

Note:

Be sure you create the network proxy authorization files before starting the queue manager (as described in Section ).

If you see messages similar to the following when you create the proxy files, you can ignore them:

%UAF-W-NETCHANERR, error assigning a channel to NET:
-SYSTEM-W-NOSUCHDEV, no such device available

For more information about network proxy accounts and files, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials. For more information about the Authorize utility, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: A-L.

Setting Up the Queue Manager and Default Queues

The initial installation of OpenVMS does not create the queue manager or any queues. HP recommends that you create the queue manager and your default batch and print queues now. When you install layered products (as described in Section ), some of these products expect such queues to be present or try to create queues themselves.

Note:

Normally, you create a queue manager only once. The system stores the START QUEUE command in the queue database to enable the queue manager to start automatically whenever the system reboots. If the queue manager has been started before on your system, do not specify this START QUEUE command again; the /NEW_VERSION qualifier causes your system to overwrite your current queue database files.

To configure shared files on multiple system disks or off the system disk, edit the SYS$MANAGER:SYLOGICALS.COM file as described in HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

To set up the queue manager and a batch queue for new installations, enter the following commands at the DCL prompt. As already noted, do not specify the recommended START QUEUE command (with the /NEW_VERSION qualifier). The /NEW_VERSION qualifier causes your system to overwrite queue database files on a system where the queue manager has been started previously.

$ START QUEUE /MANAGER /NEW_VERSION
$ INITIALIZE /QUEUE /START /BATCH SYS$BATCH

As noted, the queue manager starts automatically the next time you boot your OpenVMS system. To have the SYS$BATCH queue start automatically, edit the line in the SYS$STARTUP:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM file that starts the SYS$BATCH queue by removing the exclamation mark (!) and, if present, the extra dollar sign ($). The following example shows the line before and after editing. In that section, you can also define a default system print queue (SYS$PRINT).

Before:

$!$ START /QUEUE SYS$BATCH

After:

$ START /QUEUE SYS$BATCH

For more information about starting and creating queues, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Configuring a Multihead System (Optional)

A multihead configuration consists of a single system (such as an HP AlphaServer ES40) that supports multiple graphics options. A graphics option consists of a graphics controller (card) and a graphics display interface (monitor).

Your system can be configured automatically for multihead use if you copy the private server setup template file to a command procedure file type (.COM). The DECwindows Motif server loads this command procedure on startup or restart.

To set up your system for multihead support, perform these steps:

Note:

The DECwindows Motif software must already be on the system before you can perform the following steps. If it is not, install the software and reboot the system before you perform the steps.

  1. Copy the private server setup template file to a new .COM file by entering the following command:

    $ COPY SYS$MANAGER:DECW$PRIVATE_SERVER_SETUP.TEMPLATE
    _To: SYS$MANAGER:DECW$PRIVATE_SERVER_SETUP.COM
  2. Restart the DECwindows server by entering the following command:

    $ @SYS$STARTUP:DECW$STARTUP RESTART

For more information about customizing your DECwindows environment using the SYS$MANAGER:DECW$PRIVATE_SERVER_SETUP.COM file, see the most recent version of the DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS Installation Guide and Managing DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS Systems.

Configuring DECnet

If you installed DECnet, or if you added DECnet during an upgrade, you must now configure DECnet. Follow the instructions provided for the version of DECnet you installed. For OpenVMS I64 systems, the DECnet end node license is included with the Foundation Operating Environment (FOE) and so need not be registered and loaded. However, if you want your system to take advantage of the advanced features of DECnet (such as routing, DTSS server, DNS server), you must register and install the DECnet-Plus extended license. If you have not yet done this, perform the steps described in Section .

If you installed DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS software, see the DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS Release Notes and the HP DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS Installation and Configuration manual for information about how to configure this software using the NET$CONFIGURE procedure.

If you installed DECnet Phase IV, see the DECnet for OpenVMS Guide to Networking manual for information about configuring this software using the NETCONFIG command procedure.

Once you have configured DECnet Phase IV, edit SYS$COMMON:[SYSMGR]SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM so that the software starts when the system reboots. (This step is not required if you are running DECnet Phase V.) You can have the software start interactively or in batch mode by making one of the following changes:

Interactive mode:

Before:

$!$ START/NETWORK DECNET

After:

$ START/NETWORK DECNET

Batch mode:

Before:

$!$ SUBMIT SYS$MANAGER:STARTNET.COM

After:

$ SUBMIT SYS$MANAGER:STARTNET.COM

Important:

If you intend to run both DECnet Phase IV and a TCP product, DECnet must start first. In this case, HP recommends starting DECnet using interactive mode.

For information about editing STARTUP-VMS.COM, see Section .

Configuring HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS

If you plan to run TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS software, note the following:

  • Configure your system for networking by executing the interactive command procedure SYS$MANAGER:TCPIP$CONFIG.COM. Be sure to consult the HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS Installation and Configuration manual for specifics about configuring TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS and for configuring IPv6 support.

  • After completing the configuration, edit the command pertaining to TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS in SYS$COMMON:[SYSMGR]SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM (as instructed in Section ) so that the TCP/IP Services software starts automatically when your system is rebooted.

Important:

Do not configure TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS without first starting the queue manager.

Installing and Configuring Third-Party Networking Software

You need networking software to download patches and as a requirement for certain layered products. If you are using neither DECnet nor TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS, you should install and configure third-party networking software now. See the appropriate vendor’s product documentation.

Initializing or Configuring Other Installed Components

Initialize or configure any of the following products as necessary, following the instructions in the sections indicated:

Initializing CDSA (Optional)

The Common Data Security Architecture (CDSA) software is installed, configured, and initialized automatically with the operating system installation or upgrade. CDSA is required for Secure Delivery purposes and other security features; otherwise, use of CDSA is not required.

Note that if you installed a new CDSA kit without upgrading the base operating system, you must enter the following command to initialize CDSA prior to its first use. Enter the command from an account that has both SYSPRV and CMKRNL privileges (for example, the SYSTEM account).

$ @SYS$STARTUP:CDSA$UPGRADE

The following is an example of the output you might see:

Module uninstalled successfully.
  .
  .
  .
CDSA-I-Init, CDSA has previously been initialized on this system.
CDSA-I-Init, Re-initializing CDSA.

CDSA-I-Init, Initializing CDSA
MDS installed successfully.
  .
  .
  .
CDSA-I-Init, CDSA Initialization complete
CDSA-I-Init, Initializing Secure Delivery
Install completed successfully.
Install completed successfully.
Module installed successfully.
Module installed successfully.
CDSA-I-Init, Secure Delivery Initialization complete

Note:

Do not attempt to explicitly remove CDSA from your system. The PRODUCT REMOVE command is not supported for CDSA although there appears to be an option to remove CDSA. CDSA is installed with the operating system and is tightly bound with it. Attempts to remove it might not work as expected and can create undesirable side effects. An attempt to remove it results in a message similar to the following:

%PCSI-E-HRDREF, product HP I64VMS CDSA V2.3 is referenced by HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1
 
   The two products listed above are tightly bound by a software dependency.
   If you override the recommendation to terminate the operation, the
   referenced product will be removed, but the referencing product will have
   an unsatisfied software dependency and may no longer function correctly.
   Please review the referencing product’s documentation on requirements.

   Answer YES to the following question to terminate the PRODUCT command.
   However, if you are sure you want to remove the referenced product then
   answer NO to continue the operation.

 Terminating is strongly recommended. Do you want to terminate? [YES]

For more information about CDSA, see HP Open Source Security for OpenVMS, Volume 1: Common Data Security Architecture.

Configuring the Availability Manager Base Software (Optional)

The Availability Manager base kit is installed automatically with the operating system. However, use of Availability Manager is not required. If you do not plan to use Availability Manager or any products that depend on it, skip to the next section.

The files in the Availability Manager base kit make up what is called the Data Collector. The Data Collector is used to collect data for the Availability Manager and DECamds products. To display the data, you need to install an Availability Manager Data Analyzer kit on an OpenVMS or Windows-based node in the local LAN. The kit is included in the OpenVMS upgrade media, or you can obtain it from the following website:

http://www.hp.com/products/openvms/availabilitymanager

The base kit files are the same files that have been provided with the OpenVMS installation kit since Version 7.2. The only change for OpenVMS Version 8.2 and higher is that these files are now installed as a required product rather than being an optional software product in the operating system kit. Procedures for configuring and using these files remain unchanged.

For more information about how to configure and use the files in the Availability Manager base kit, see the section "Performing Postinstallation Tasks" in the Availability Manager installation instructions for OpenVMS (HP Availability Manager Installation Instructions). This and other Availability Manager documents are available at:

http://www.hp.com/products/openvms/availabilitymanager

Note:

Do not attempt to explicitly remove the Availability Manager from your system. The PRODUCT REMOVE command is not supported for Availability Manager although there appears to be an option to remove Availability Manager. The Availability Manager base software is installed with the operating system and is tightly bound with it. Attempts to remove it might not work as expected and can create undesirable side effects. An attempt to remove it results in a message similar to the following:

%PCSI-E-HRDREF, product HP I64VMS Availability Manager V8.3-1H1 is referenced by HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1
 
   The two products listed above are tightly bound by a software dependency.
   If you override the recommendation to terminate the operation, the
   referenced product will be removed, but the referencing product will have
   an unsatisfied software dependency and may no longer function correctly.
   Please review the referencing product’s documentation on requirements.

   Answer YES to the following question to terminate the PRODUCT command.
   However, if you are sure you want to remove the referenced product then
   answer NO to continue the operation.

 Terminating is strongly recommended. Do you want to terminate? [YES]

Configuring Kerberos (Optional)

The Kerberos for OpenVMS software, which is based on MIT Kerberos, is installed automatically with the operating system. However, use of Kerberos is not required. If you do not plan to use Kerberos or any products that depend on Kerberos, skip to the next section.

To configure Kerberos, perform the following steps from a privileged OpenVMS user account (for example, SYSTEM).

  1. Run the following command procedure to configure the Kerberos clients and servers:

    $ @SYS$STARTUP:KRB$CONFIGURE.COM
  2. Add the following line to your SYLOGIN command procedure or to the LOGIN.COM of each user who will use Kerberos:

    $ @SYS$MANAGER:KRB$SYMBOLS
  3. Edit SYS$MANAGER:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM to remove the exclamation point from the KRB$STARTUP.COM line so that it appears as shown in the following example. (Note that SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM has HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS starting before Kerberos. This is required.)

    $ @SYS$STARTUP:KRB$STARTUP.COM

For additional setup and configuration information, see the HP Open Source Security for OpenVMS, Volume 3: Kerberos manual. This document contains links to the MIT Kerberos documentation and is available from the OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 kit.

Note:

Do not attempt to explicitly remove Kerberos from your system. The PRODUCT REMOVE command is not supported for Kerberos although there appears to be an option to remove Kerberos. Kerberos is installed with the operating system and is tightly bound with it. Attempts to remove it might not work as expected and can create undesirable side effects. An attempt to remove it results in a message similar to the following:

%PCSI-E-HRDREF, product HP I64VMS Kerberos V3.1 is referenced by HP I64VMS
OPENVMS V8.3-1H1

   The two products listed above are tightly bound by a software dependency.
   If you override the recommendation to terminate the operation, the
   referenced product will be removed, but the referencing product will have
   an unsatisfied software dependency and may no longer function correctly.
   Please review the referencing product’s documentation on requirements.

   Answer YES to the following question to terminate the PRODUCT command.
   However, if you are sure you want to remove the referenced product then
   answer NO to continue the operation.

 Terminating is strongly recommended. Do you want to terminate? [YES]

Configuring SSL for OpenVMS (Optional)

The HP SSL for OpenVMS software is installed automatically with the operating system. However, use of SSL is not required. If you do not plan to use SSL or any products that depend on it, skip to the next section.

The SSL$STARTUP.COM command procedure has been added to VMS$LPBEGIN-050 to enable SSL to start automatically.

Add the following line to SYS$MANAGER:SYSHUTDOWN.COM:

$ @SYS$STARTUP:SSL$SHUTDOWN.COM

If you are upgrading and have an earlier version of SSL installed, copy your SSL$STARTUP.TEMPLATE file (located in SYS$STARTUP) to SSL$STARTUP.COM in the SYS$STARTUP directory.

Several other post-installation and post-upgrade tasks are required, as described in the SSL release notes, available in SYS$HELP:SSLnnn.RELEASE_NOTES, where nnn is the version of the SSL software, such as 013.

For more information about SSL, see HP Open Source Security for OpenVMS, Volume 2: HP SSL for OpenVMS.

Note:

Do not attempt to explicitly remove SSL from your system. The PRODUCT REMOVE command is not supported for SSL although there appears to be an option to remove SSL. SSL is installed with the operating system and is tightly bound with it. Attempts to remove it might not work as expected and can create undesirable side effects. An attempt to remove it results in a message similar to the following:

%PCSI-E-HRDREF, product HP I64VMS SSL V1.3 is referenced by HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1

   The two products listed above are tightly bound by a software dependency.
   If you override the recommendation to terminate the operation, the
   referenced product will be removed, but the referencing product will have
   an unsatisfied software dependency and may no longer function correctly.
   Please review the referencing product’s documentation on requirements.

   Answer YES to the following question to terminate the PRODUCT command.
   However, if you are sure you want to remove the referenced product then
   answer NO to continue the operation.

 Terminating is strongly recommended. Do you want to terminate? [YES]

Configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS (Optional; I64 only)

WBEM Services for OpenVMS is installed automatically with OpenVMS. As with other similar products, an OpenVMS upgrade does not automatically include WBEM Services for OpenVMS if it is not already installed on the target system disk. In this case, you must install the product separately using the PCSI PRODUCT INSTALL command. If you do not plan to use WBEM Services for OpenVMS or any products that depend on it, simply do not configure the software; if you have already configured the software, you can choose not to start it.

You must configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS to obtain the services provided by HP SIM (Version 5.2 or later) and products such as Instant Capacity, Pay per use, and gWLM. To provide services over the network, HP recommends using TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS and SSL (for security purposes).

Before configuring WBEM Services for OpenVMS, configure TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS. (For information about configuring TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS, see Section .

To configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS on a system on which WBEM Services for OpenVMS has never been installed and configured, follow the steps described in “Section .” If you are configuring the product on a system on which it has been configured previously, see Section .

For the latest information about WBEM Services for OpenVMS, see the following website:

http://h71000.www7.hp.com/openvms/system_management.html

For more information about HP WBEM products, see the following website:

http://www.hp.com/go/wbem

Note:

HP recommends that you do not remove the WBEM Services for OpenVMS product even if you do not have a need for it. If you attempt to use the PRODUCT REMOVE command to remove this product, you might see a message similar to the following. This message is automatically displayed for any product that is required with OpenVMS. The consequences of removing WBEM Services for OpenVMS might not be as severe as implied by the message unless other software is using the product on your server.

%PCSI-E-HRDREF, product HP I64VMS WBEMCIM V2.61 is referenced by HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1
 
   The two products listed above are tightly bound by a software dependency.
   If you override the recommendation to terminate the operation, the
   referenced product will be removed, but the referencing product will have
   an unsatisfied software dependency and may no longer function correctly.
   Please review the referencing product’s documentation on requirements.

   Answer YES to the following question to terminate the PRODUCT command.
   However, if you are sure you want to remove the referenced product then
   answer NO to continue the operation.

 Terminating is strongly recommended. Do you want to terminate? [YES]

Configuring WBEM Services for OpenVMS (Where Not Configured Previously)

To configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS on a system for the first time, follow these steps:

  1. Enter the following command

    $ RUN SYS$SYSROOT:[WBEM_SERVICES]WBEM_SERVICES$CONFIG

    This command invokes the utility that configures and initializes the environment for WBEM Services for OpenVMS.

  2. After displaying the initial configuration utility banner, the utility informs you where it will store the configuration files and repository and asks if you want to change the location.

    The configuration files and repository will be placed in the following location:
    SYS$SPECIFIC:[WBEM_Services].
    
    Do you want to change this location (Yes/No) [No]?:

    Note:

    The repository, a compiled version of the Common Information Model (CIM) class schema, requires an ODS-5 formatted disk (the repository uses UNIX-style file names, which are not supported on ODS-2 formatted disks). If the default location is on an ODS-2 formatted disk, you must change the location to an ODS-5 disk.

    When you accept the default location, the utility informs you that all configuration questions have been answered and asks whether you want to continue, as shown in the following example. If you choose to continue, the utility creates the CIMServer repository tree in the location indicated earlier. The CIMServer is the WBEM Services for OpenVMS process that runs on the system to support certain applications. It also creates the following command files:

    SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Startup.com
    SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Shutdown.com
    SYS$SYSROOT:[WBEM_SERVICES]WBEM_Services$Define_Commands.com

    The SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Startup.com file defines system logicals for the WBEM Services for OpenVMS environment.

    All configuration questions have been answered.
    
    Do you want to continue (Yes/No) [YES]?:
    
    %WBEMCONFIG-I-CREREPBEGIN, Create Repository Begins...
    %WBEMCONFIG-I-CREREPCOMPLETE, Create Repository Complete.
    This utility creates:
        SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Startup.com
    which should be added to SYS$STARTUP:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM.
    
    This utility creates:
        SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Shutdown.com
    which should be added to SYS$STARTUP:SYSHUTDWN.COM.
    
    This utility creates:
        SYS$SYSROOT:[wbem_services]WBEM_Services$Define_Commands.com
    which users who use this product can add to their login.com.
  3. The utility asks whether to start the CIMServer:

    Do you want to start the CIMServer now (Yes/No) [Yes]?:

    CIMServer must be running so that your system can use such applications as Instant Capacity, Pay per use, and gWLM. You can start CIMServer now, or you can perform other postinstallation or postupgrade tasks first and then start CIMServer. If you choose to start CIMServer now, the utility displays the progress and operating system information, as in the following example:

    %RUN-S-PROC_ID, identification of created process is 21A00599
    %WBEMCIM-I-STARTUPWAIT, Waiting for CIMServer to start... 120 seconds remaining.
    %WBEMCIM-S-CSSTARTED, CIMServer successfully started.
    OperatingSystem Information
      Host: boston.hp.com
      Name: OpenVMS
      Version: V8.3-1H1
      UserLicense: Unlimited user license
      Number of Users: 1 users
      Number of Processes: 29 processes
      OSCapability: 64 bit
      LastBootTime: Jul 31, 2007  10:52:55 (-0400)
      LocalDateTime: Aug 3, 2007  10:14:58 (-0400)
      SystemUpTime: 256923 seconds = 2 days, 23 hrs, 22 mins, 3 secs
  4. To ensure that CIMServer starts automatically at each reboot, add the following line to the SYS$MANAGER:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM file:

    $ @SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Startup.com

    To have CIMServer shut down automatically with the operating system, add the following line to the SYS$MANAGER:SYSSTARTUP:SYSHUTDWN.COM file:

    $ @SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Shutdown.com

    All users who use this product should also add the following line to their LOGIN.COM file:

    $ @SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Define_Commands.com

  5. In an OpenVMS Cluster, each member that runs WBEM Services for OpenVMS needs its own repository. Therefore, you must perform the WBEM Services for OpenVMS configuration procedure on each of those cluster members.

Configuring WBEM Services for OpenVMS (Where Configured Previously)

To configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS on a system where it has been configured previously, follow these steps:

  1. Enter the following command

    $ RUN SYS$SYSROOT:[WBEM_SERVICES]WBEM_SERVICES$CONFIG

    This command starts the utility that configures and initializes the environment for WBEM Services for OpenVMS.

    If the WBEM Services for OpenVMS product (Version 2.0) available with OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3 is already configured on your system, the following error message and the recommended remedial actions appear:

    %WBEMCONFIG-E-SYSCOMMONLOGICAL, WBEM_VAR can no longer be defined to point to
    a location in SYS$COMMON. The repository files in WBEM_VAR should not be shared
    with other cluster members.
    
    Follow these manual steps to move the repository out of the SYS$COMMON
    area and complete the post installation configuration tasks:
    
    o Delete the sys$common:[WBEM_Services.var...] directory tree.
    o Deassign the WBEM_VAR system logical.
    o Run this procedure again.

    Perform the recommended steps, as in the following example:

    $ DELETE SYS$COMMON:[WBEM_SERVICES.VAR]*.*;*
    $ DELETE SYS$COMMON:[WBEM_SERVICES]VAR.DIR;*
    $ DEASSIGN/SYS WBEM_VAR
    $ RUN SYS$SYSROOT:[WBEM_SERVICES]WBEM_SERVICES$CONFIG

    After you start the configuration procedure, go to Section  and follow the steps described there, starting with step 2.

  2. After displaying the initial configuration utility banner, the utility informs you where it will store the configuration files and repository and asks if you want to change the location.

    The configuration files and repository will be placed in the following location:
    SYS$SPECIFIC:[WBEM_Services].
    
    Do you want to change this location (Yes/No) [No]?:

    The repository is a compiled version of the CIM class schema. This example assumes you accept the current location.

  3. As shown in the following example, the utility informs you that all configuration questions have been answered and asks whether you want to continue.

    If the utility determines that the repository schema has not changed, the utility informs you and continues. The utility does not need to upgrade the repository.

    If the utility determines that the current repository needs upgrading, or if the utility does not find a repository (perhaps WBEM Services for OpenVMS had been installed but not configured), the utility displays a message informing you that the repository will be upgraded or created and that this will take 10 to 15 minutes depending on your processor and disk I/O speed. In the following example, the utility needs to create the repository tree.

    The utility also creates the SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Startup.com, SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Shutdown.com, and SYS$SYSROOT:[WBEM_SERVICES]WBEM_Services$Define_Commands.com command files. The SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Startup.com file defines system logicals for the WBEM Services for OpenVMS environment.

    All configuration questions have been answered.
    
    Do you want to continue (Yes/No) [Yes]?:
    
    %WBEMCONFIG-I-CREREPBEGIN, Create Repository Begins...
    %WBEMCONFIG-I-CREREPCOMPLETE, Create Repository Complete.
    This utility creates:
        SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Startup.com
    which should be added to SYS$STARTUP:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM.
    
    This utility creates:
        SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Shutdown.com
    which should be added to SYS$STARTUP:SYSHUTDWN.COM.
    
    This utility creates:
        SYS$SYSROOT:[wbem_services]WBEM_Services$Define_Commands.com
    which users who use this product can add to their login.com.
  4. The utility now asks you whether to start the CIMServer:

    Do you want to start the CIMServer now (Y/N) {Y}?:

    CIMServer must be running so that your system can use such applications as Instant Capacity, Pay per use, and gWLM. You can start CIMServer now, or you can perform other postinstallation or postupgrade tasks first and then start CIMServer. If you choose to start CIMServer now, the utility displays the progress and operating system information, as in the following example:

    %RUN-S-PROC_ID, identification of created process is 21A00599
    %WBEMCIM-I-STARTUPWAIT, Waiting for CIMServer to start... 120 seconds remaining.
    %WBEMCIM-S-CSSTARTED, CIMServer successfully started.
    OperatingSystem Information
      Host: boston.hp.com
      Name: OpenVMS
      Version: V8.3-1H1
      UserLicense: Unlimited user license
      Number of Users: 1 users
      Number of Processes: 29 processes
      OSCapability: 64 bit
      LastBootTime: Jul 31, 2007  10:52:55 (-0400)
      LocalDateTime: Aug 3, 2007  10:14:58 (-0400)
      SystemUpTime: 256923 seconds = 2 days, 23 hrs, 22 mins, 3 secs
  5. To ensure that CIMServer starts automatically at each reboot, add the following line to the SYS$MANAGER:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM file:

    $ @SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Startup.com

    To have CIMServer shut down automatically with the operating system, add the following line to the SYS$MANAGER:SYSSTARTUP:SYSHUTDWN.COM file:

    $ @SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Shutdown.com

    All users who use this product should also add the following line to their LOGIN.COM file:

    $ @SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Define_Commands.com

  6. In an OpenVMS Cluster, each member that will run WBEM Services for OpenVMS needs its own repository. Therefore, you must perform the WBEM Services for OpenVMS configuration procedure on each of those cluster members.

Configure WBEM Providers for OpenVMS (Optional; I64 only)

WBEM Providers for OpenVMS is installed automatically with OpenVMS. As with other similar products, an OpenVMS upgrade does not include WBEM Providers for OpenVMS if it is not currently installed on the target system disk. In this case, you must install the product separately using the PCSI PRODUCT INSTALL command.

You must configure WBEM Providers for OpenVMS to obtain the services provided by HP SIM (Version 5.2 or later) and GiCAP. WBEM Providers for OpenVMS requires WBEM Services for OpenVMS.

To configure WBEM Providers for OpenVMS, follow these steps:

  1. If not done so already, define the WBEM Services logicals by entering the following command:

    $ @SYS$COMMON:[WBEM_SERVICES]WBEM_Services$Define_Commands.com
  2. Ensure that the CIM Server is running and verify the list of providers installed by entering the following command:

    $ CIMPROVIDER -L -S

    This displays output similar to the following:

    
    MODULE                         STATUS
    OperatingSystemModule          OK
    ComputerSystemModule           OK
    ProcessModule                  OK
  3. By default, the state of HTTP is false. Verify the status of TCP/IP port 5998 by entering the following command:

    $ CIMCONFIG -G "enableHttpConnection"
  4. If the state of the TCP/IP port 5998 is false, set it to true and restart the WBEM server by entering the following commands (waiting a few minutes for the shutdown to complete, as noted):

    $ CIMCONFIG -S "enableHttpConnection=true" -P
    $ @SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Shutdown.com
       .
       .
       .
    Wait a few minutes for the shutdown process to complete before entering the following startup command.
    $ @SYS$STARTUP:WBEM_Services$Startup.com
  5. To configure the WBEM Providers for OpenVMS software, enter the following command:

    $ @SYS$COMMON:[WBEMPROVIDERS]WBEMPROVIDERS$CONFIGURE.COM

    The configuration process takes a few minutes to complete and displays output similar to the following:

    Starting WBEMPROVIDERS Configuration. This would take around
    5 minutes
    Starting WBEMPROVIDERS. This would take around 2 minutes
    Inventory is not ready! Waiting for 2 Minutes
    %RUN-S-PROC_ID, identification of created process is
    23800EC2
    WBEMPROVIDERS configuration is completed.

    This command procedure registers the WBEM Providers software with the CIM Server and copies the node specific files to SYS$SPECIFIC:[WBEMPROVIDERS].

  6. Verify the list of providers installed and their status by entering the following command:

    $ CIMPROVIDER -L -S

    This displays output similar to the following:

    MODULE                         STATUS
    OperatingSystemModule                     OK
    ComputerSystemModule                      OK
    ProcessModule                             OK
    EventIndicationConsumerModule             OK
    StateChangeIndicationProviderModule       OK
    ChassisProviderModule                     OK
    cpuprovidermodule                         OK
    MemoryModule                              OK
    EMSWrapperProviderModule                  OK
    FirmwareRevisionProviderModule            OK
    MPProviderModule                          OK
    EnclosureProviderModule                   OK

To configure WBEM Providers for OpenVMS, follow the directions provided in the HP WBEM Providers Installation and Adminstrator's Guide, available in the SYS$COMMON:[WBEMPROVIDERS.DOCUMENTATION] directory on your OpenVMS system disk. For the latest information, see the following website and select the appropriate link:

http://h71000.www7.hp.com/openvms/system_management.html

Note:

HP recommends that you do not remove the WBEM Providers for OpenVMS product even if you do not have a need for it. If you attempt to use the PRODUCT REMOVE command to remove this product, you might see a message similar to the following. This message is automatically displayed for any product that is required with OpenVMS; the consequences of removing WBEM Providers for OpenVMS might not be as severe as implied by the message unless other software (such as HP SIM and GiCAP) is using the product on your Integrity server.

%PCSI-E-HRDREF, product HP I64VMS WBEMPROVIDERS V1.5 is referenced by HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1
 
   The two products listed above are tightly bound by a software dependency.
   If you override the recommendation to terminate the operation, the
   referenced product will be removed, but the referencing product will have
   an unsatisfied software dependency and may no longer function correctly.
   Please review the referencing product’s documentation on requirements.

   Answer YES to the following question to terminate the PRODUCT command.
   However, if you are sure you want to remove the referenced product then
   answer NO to continue the operation.

 Terminating is strongly recommended. Do you want to terminate? [YES]

Configure the Instant Capacity Software (Optional; I64 only)

Instant Capacity (iCAP) software is supported on cell-based Integrity servers. For support of this software, as well as Temporary Instant Capacity (TiCAP) and Global Instant Capacity (GiCAP), you must configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS.

If you choose to use Instant Capacity, Temporary Instant Capacity, or Global Instant Capacity, configure the software by entering the following command:

$ @SYS$MANAGER:ICAP$CONFIG.COM

For more information about configuring and using Instant Capacity, see the HP Instant Capacity User’s Guide on the following website:

http://docs.hp.com/en/hplex.html#Utility%20Pricing

Configure the Pay per use Software (Optional; I64 only)

Pay per use (PPU) software is supported on cell-based Integrity servers leased from HP Finance. For support of this software, you must configure WBEM Services for OpenVMS.

If you choose to use Pay per use, configure the software by entering the following command:

$ @SYS$MANAGER:PPU$CONFIG.COM

For more information about configuring and using Pay per use, see the HP Pay per use User’s Guide on the following website:

http://docs.hp.com/en/hplex.html#Utility%20Pricing

Configure HP SIM (Optional; I64 only)

To enable HP SIM support of OpenVMS on your system, follow the directions provided in the HP WBEM Providers Installation and Adminstrator's Guide, available in the SYS$COMMON:[WBEMPROVIDERS.DOCUMENTATION] directory on your OpenVMS system disk. For the latest information, see the documentation provided at the following website:

http://h18002.www1.hp.com/products/servers/management/hpsim/download.html

Initializing and Running the Performance Data Collector Base Software (Optional)

The Performance Data Collector for HP OpenVMS (TDC) collects and manages configuration and performance data for analysis by other applications. TDC_RT Version 2.2 is a run-time only (base) variant of the TDC software that is installed automatically with the OpenVMS operating system for use on specific operating system platforms.

Use of the TDC_RT software is not required. If you do not plan to use TDC_RT or any products that depend on it, you can skip to the next section.

TDC_RT does not run automatically when the system starts, but any suitably privileged user can start the software manually. This section includes information about system parameters, privileges and quotas, startup, and installation in OpenVMS Clusters.

Note:

Do not attempt to explicitly remove TDC_RT from your system. The PRODUCT REMOVE command is not supported for TDC_RT although there appears to be an option to remove it. TDC_RT is installed with the operating system and is tightly bound with it. HP or third-party applications might require TDC_RT. Attempts to remove it might not work as expected and can create undesirable side effects. An attempt to remove it results in a message similar to the following:

%PCSI-E-HRDREF, product HP TDC_RT V2.3 is referenced by HP I64VMS OPENVMS
V8.3-1H1

   The two products listed above are tightly bound by a software dependency.
   If you override the recommendation to terminate the operation, the
   referenced product will be removed, but the referencing product will have
   an unsatisfied software dependency and may no longer function correctly.
   Please review the referencing product’s documentation on requirements.

   Answer YES to the following question to terminate the PRODUCT command.
   However, if you are sure you want to remove the referenced product then
   answer NO to continue the operation.

 Terminating is strongly recommended. Do you want to terminate? [YES]

User Privileges and Quotas

Users of TDC_RT require various privileges, depending on the types of data to be collected. Online help is available when running the collector application and specifies the privileges required to collect each type of data. Enabling the following set of privileges enables collection of all data items: CMKRNL, LOG_IO, NETMBX, PHY_IO, SYSLCK, SYSPRV, WORLD.

Users of the product also require working set quotas (WSQUO) greater than 7000 pagelets.the following:

6000 pagelets on Alpha systems
7000 pagelets on I64 systems

Startup File

TDC_RT provides a startup file that should be launched during system startup. The startup file defines several logical names required for use of the product, but the startup file does not actually start the data collector.

Add the following line to SYS$MANAGER:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM:

$ @SYS$STARTUP:TDC$STARTUP

To directly run TDC$STARTUP.COM, SYSNAM privilege is required.

Compatibility with Prior Releases

Note the following about prior releases of TDC software.

  • TDC Version 1.n

    For users of some third-party system-management applications, TDC Version 1.n was distributed by web download. Applications developed using TDC Version 1.n will not work with TDC Version 2.2 software until they are rebuilt using the TDC Version 2.2 Software Developer’s Kit (SDK). You can obtain this SDK kit from the following website:

    http://www.hp.com/products/openvms/tdc/

    Data files created using TDC Version 1.n cannot be read by TDC_RT Version 2.2. Data files created using TDC_RT Version 2.2 cannot be read using TDC Version 1.n.

    When TDC_RT Version 2.1 or any newer version of TDC is installed, files associated with TDC Version 1.n are not removed. In any case, TDC_RT Version 2.1 (or later) and TDC Version 1.n can safely coexist on a system. You can remove the older TDC files by uninstalling TDC (use the DCL command PRODUCT REMOVE).

  • TDC Version 2.2 on an earlier version of OpenVMS

    If you upgrade to OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 from an earlier version of OpenVMS on which TDC Version 2.2 was installed, files shared by TDC_RT Version 2.2 and TDC Version 2.2 are updated; these files are the documentation and support files listed in SYS$COMMON:[TDC]README.TXT as common to all kit variants. Unless the TDC and TDC_RT kits share the same baselevel number (for example, 102), image files installed with TDC Version 2.2 are retained in their installed locations. Most likely, the downloaded TDC Version 2.2 software will be more recent (higher baselevel number) than the TDC_RT Version 2.2 software installed with OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1. The TDC Version 2.2 SDK (if installed) and any additional documentation files installed with TDC Version 2.2 are retained.

    Running SYS$STARTUP:TDC$STARTUP.COM causes the most recent TDC/TDC_RT Version 2.2 images to be used at runtime, regardless of whether they were installed with TDC Version 2.2 or with TDC_RT Version 2.2.

    You can remove TDC Version 2.2 without affecting the integrity of the TDC_RT Version 2.2 installation if their baselevel numbers differ.

As of OpenVMS Version 8.2, TDC and TDC_RT use the same naming scheme for image files. A build number is tagged to the image file names. For example, if the version of TDC_RT that ships with your operating system is Version 2.2-60 (where 60 is the build number), then the files that are installed will have names such as TDC$APISHR$I_V830-0060.EXE, where $I denotes I64)TDC$APISHR$A_V830-0060.EXE, where $A denotes Alpha ($I denotes I64), V830 denotes the version of OpenVMS (8.3), and 0060 is the build number. The SYS$STARTUP:TDC$STARTUP.COM startup file, which is also identical for both TDC and TDC_RT, uses this build number to determine which image files to use. When a subsequent installation is performed with software that has higher build numbers, the TDC$STARTUP.COM startup file uses the image files with the highest build number appropriate for the current platform.

Running TDC_RT

To run the collector application, users can enter the TDC command at the DCL prompt. But first, because the TDC command is not included in the system command table SYS$LIBRARY:DCLTABLES.EXE, each user must add the command to their table by entering the following command at the DCL prompt:

$ SET COMMAND SYS$COMMON:[TDC]TDC$DCL

Each user can add this SET command to their LOGIN.COM file. However, because elevated privileges are required for most data collection operations, it might not be appropriate to add this command to SYS$MANAGER:SYLOGIN.COM.

To start the collector application, enter the TDC command:

$ TDC

For more information about running the application, see the file SYS$COMMON:[TDC]TDC_README.TXT. Release notes are located in the file SYS$COMMON:[TDC]TDC_RELEASE_NOTES.TXT. See both of these files before running the collector application.

Installation in OpenVMS Clusters

TDC_RT is installed in SYS$COMMON:[TDC] by default. Included are only those files required to run the data collector with the particular operating system version it was distributed with. Once TDC_RT is installed and SYS$STARTUP:TDC$STARTUP.COM has been run on each cluster member, then all cluster members in a single-version, single-architecture OpenVMS Cluster should be able to run the software.

For mixed-version and mixed-architecture clusters, you should obtain and install a complete Performance Data Collector kit (TDC Version 2.2) from the following website:

http://www.hp.com/products/openvms/tdc

The complete kit provides an SDK and run-time environments for all supported OpenVMS configurations. It supports installation on a clusterwide basis in mixed-version and mixed-architecture OpenVMS Clusters.

Preparing to Use OpenVMS Management Station (Optional)

If you installed the OpenVMS Management Station software on your system (either by accepting all default values or by selecting the component manually during the installation or upgrade procedure), you must perform several tasks on your OpenVMS system and your PC before you can use OpenVMS Management Station. These tasks include the following:

  • Editing system files

  • Starting OpenVMS Management Station on other nodes

  • Verifying that you have the proper memory, disk space, media, and the required software to install and run OpenVMS Management Station on your PC

  • Installing the client software on your PC

  • Defining DECnet nodes (after a new installation only)

For complete information about preparing your OpenVMS system and your PC to run the OpenVMS Management Station server and client software, see Appendix H.

Installing OpenVMS Debugger Clients on a PC (Optional)

The latest version of the OpenVMS Debugger runs on OpenVMS Alpha and I64 systems. The debug server runs on OpenVMS, while a debug client, which is the user interface to the server, runs on OpenVMS and on Microsoft Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Vista. There is no special installation procedure for the components that run on OpenVMS. The installation guide and kit for the OpenVMS debugger client is located on the Layered Products CD that comes with the OpenVMS binary CD set. The directory on the CD is DEBUG_CLIENTS011. The KIT.DIR subdirectory contains the following files:

  • 40COMUPD.EXE

  • DEBUGX86011.EXE

For installation instructions, see the INSTALLATION_INFO.PS or INSTALLATION_INFO.TXT file in the DOCUMENTATION subdirectory.

Creating a System-Specific Login Welcome Message (Optional)

You can use SYS$WELCOME to display a system-specific welcome message at login. The message could inform users of scheduled down time, recent updates to the system, whom to contact about system problems, and so forth. A template file is provided by the operating system. To create your own SYS$WELCOME file, do the following:

  1. Copy the template file using the following command:

    $ COPY SYS$MANAGER:WELCOME.TXT SYS$SPECIFIC:[SYSMGR]WELCOME.TXT

    For a clusterwide welcome message, you can copy the file to SYS$COMMON:[SYSMGR].

  2. Replace the text in SYS$SPECIFIC:[SYSMGR]WELCOME.TXT with text specific to your system.

  3. Edit SYS$MANAGER:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM to remove the exclamation point (!) from the line that defines SYS$WELCOME.

If you do not want to use a node-specific welcome file, you can optionally define the logical in SYS$MANAGER:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM to display a message, such as in the following example:

$ DEFINE SYS$WELCOME “Welcome to node HOMER”

For more information about creating login welcome messages, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Examining Your Command Procedures (Upgrades Only)

The upgrade procedure retains the site-specific versions of the following files located in the [VMS$COMMON] directory:

  • [SYSMGR]LAT$SYSTARTUP.COM

  • [SYSMGR]LOGIN.COM

  • [SYSMGR]SYCONFIG.COM

  • [SYSMGR]SYLOGICALS.COM

  • [SYSMGR]SYLOGIN.COM

  • [SYSMGR]SYPAGSWPFILES.COM

  • [SYSMGR]SYSECURITY.COM

  • [SYSMGR]SYSHUTDWN.COM

  • [SYSMGR]SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM

  • [SYSMGR]TFF$SYSTARTUP.COM

  • [SYSMGR]WELCOME.TXT

  • [SYS$STARTUP]ESS$LAST_STARTUP.DAT

The upgrade procedure might provide new templates for some of these files with the .TEMPLATE file extension. The new templates might include features that are not in your site-specific files. Check the templates against your site-specific files and edit your files as necessary.

Note:

As of Version 8.3 of OpenVMS, the DCL command DECRAM has been removed because it conflicts with the new DECRYPT command (DECRYPT overwrites the default definition of DECR, which you might have been using to run DECram). You should update any command procedures that use the DECRAM command so that they use the foreign command style of DCL to run DECRAM:

$ DECRAM == "$MDMANAGER"

This change affects only the use of the DCL command; all other aspects of the DECram product remain the same.

Adding and Removing Operating System Files (Optional)

If you decide after the installation or upgrade to change which OpenVMS operating system files you want installed on your system, you can use the menu system contained on the OpenVMS operating system media to add or remove files.

Note:

You can obtain information about individual system files by entering the HELP SYSTEM_FILES command at the dollar sign prompt ($).

Important:

Unless you have a specific need to exclude operating system files from your system disk, HP strongly recommends that you accept the defaults and install all files that are part of OpenVMS. In general, limited disk space is not a good reason to exclude files; problems encountered when needed files are missing can cost much more than the cost of a larger disk.

To add or remove operating system files:

  1. Mount and boot the OpenVMS operating system media.

  2. Choose option 1 on the menu.

  3. Choose the PRESERVE option.

  4. Enter the name of the device that contains the system disk and answer the questions.

  5. After you answer the question “Do you want detailed descriptions?,” information regarding reconfiguring or reinstalling is displayed. Read the instructions, then choose the desired entry on the menu of options.

The following is a sample display:

  Please choose one of the following:

    1)  Upgrade, install or reconfigure OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1
    2)  Display layered products that this procedure can install
    3)  Install or upgrade layered products
    4)  Show installed products
    5)  Reconfigure installed products
    6)  Remove installed products
    7)  Find, Install or Undo patches; Show or Delete recovery data
    8)  Execute DCL commands and procedures
    9)  Shut down this system      

Enter CHOICE or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/?) 1
***********************************************************
     .
     .
     .

   Do you want to INITIALIZE or to PRESERVE? [PRESERVE] PRESERVE
     .
     .
     .
       Version 8.3-1H1 of the OpenVMS operating system is already installed
       on the target disk.  You may choose one of the following actions:

       o Reconfigure the OpenVMS platform.

         This action will allow you to change your selections of which
         of the windowing and network products you included with your
         OpenVMS operating system installation.

       o Reconfigure the OpenVMS operating system.

         This action will allow you to change your choices about which
         options you included for the OpenVMS operating system.

       o Reinstall the OpenVMS operating system.

         This action will cause ALL operating system  files to be replaced.
         You can also change your choices about which options you included
         for the OpenVMS operating system.

         Reinstall will take longer than Reconfigure.  Reinstall may be
         appropriate if you suspect that files in the operating system,
         or in the windowing and network products have become corrupted.

       If you want to reinstall any of the windowing and network products,
       choose "Install or upgrade layered products" from the main menu.

       If you want to change your choices about which options you included
       for any of the windowing and network products, choose "Reconfigure
       installed products" (option 5) from the main menu.

       Please choose one of the following:

           1)  Reconfigure the OpenVMS platform.
           2)  Reconfigure the OpenVMS operating system.
           3)  Reinstall the OpenVMS operating system.
           4)  Return to the Main Menu (abort the upgrade/installation).


Enter choice or ? for help: (1/2/3/4/?) 2
The following product has been selected:
       HP I64VMS VMS V8.3-1H1                Operating System


   Configuration phase starting ...

   You will be asked to choose options, if any, for each selected product 
   and for any products that may be installed to satisfy software dependency
   requirements.

   HP I64VMS OPENVMS V8.3-1H1: OpenVMS and related products Platform

        COPYRIGHT 1976, 30-AUG-2007 
        Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. 
      

   Do you want the defaults for all options? [YES] NO

Answer NO to this question as shown, and select the options you want, as described in step 19 of the installation procedure in Section . (Example 3.1 shows a list of the component options.) After you respond to the prompts, the display continues and the installation procedure completes. The following is a continuation of the sample display:

Do you want to review the options? [NO] 
Execution phase starting ...

The following product will be reconfigured:
    HP I64VMS VMS V8.3-1H1
Portion done: 0%...10%...20%...30%...40%...50%...60%...80%...90%...100%

The following product has been reconfigured:
    HP I64VMS VMS V8.3-1H1
     .
     .   
     .

For detailed instructions on how to remove the OpenVMS operating system from your disk, see Appendix I.

Expanding the System Libraries (Optional; OpenVMS Alpha Only)Compressing the System Libraries (Optional, OpenVMS I64: Not Recommended)

Libraries included with the OpenVMS Alpha operating system kit are installed in data-reduced (compressed) format. Unless disk space is limited, HP recommends expanding (decompressing) these libraries to give the system faster access to them.

The libraries included with the OpenVMS I64 operating system kit are installed in expanded (uncompressed) format. HP recommends keeping the libraries in expanded format. Compressing them can hinder system performance. You can use the command procedure SYS$UPDATE:LIBDECOMP.COM to decompress, compress, or list the sizes of the system libraries.

To expand libraries that are in data-reduced format or compress libraries that are in expanded format, use the OpenVMS Library Decompression utility (LIBDECOMP.COM). The utility runs on both OpenVMS Alpha and I64 systems. To run the utility, enter the following command:

$ @SYS$UPDATE:LIBDECOMP

For more information about the utility, you can request help by entering the following command:

$ @SYS$UPDATE:LIBDECOMP HELP

You can list the sizes and format (reduced or expanded) of the libraries by using the following command:

$ @SYS$UPDATE:LIBDECOMP LIST

For complete information about expanding and reducing system library files and using LIBDECOMP.COM, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

Table 7.2 lists the libraries that ship on OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 and shows the approximate sizes of the libraries in both data-reduced (compressed) and expanded format. Note that library sizes differ for Alpha and I64 systems.

Note:

File sizes are subject to change. In addition, layered products and user applications might add entries to the HELPLIB.HLB and STARLET.OLB libraries. The sizes listed in Table 7.1 do not reflect such entries. For the most accurate information, run the Library Decompression utility on your own system and review the output from the list function.

The LIBDECOMP.COM utility lists the following libraries as “Library not present”:

  • [SYSLIB]SYSBLDMLB.MLB

  • [SYSLIB]DECCRTL.OLB

  • [SYSLIB]SYSBLDLIB.OLB

These libraries are not used with OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS I64; they are used with OpenVMS VAX only. These libraries are omitted from Table 7.2.

Reduced and Expanded Sizes of Libraries

Library Name/Description

OpenVMS Alpha

OpenVMS I64

Reduced Size (as shipped)Expanded SizeReduced Size Expanded Size (as shipped)
[SYSHLP] directory; Help library files (.HLB)    
ACLEDT.HLB
Access Control List Editor help
7010270103
BKM$HELP.HLB
Backup Manager help
156248156251
DBG$HELP.HLB
OpenVMS Debugger help
1237214412372164
DBG$UIHELP.HLB
OpenVMS Debugger help
271441271465
EDTHELP.HLB
EDT Editor help
154229154233
EVE$HELP.HLB
EVE Editor help
67611976761177
EVE$KEYHELP.HLB
EVE Keypad help
9914599148
EXCHNGHLP.HLB
Exchange Utility help
8311883118
HELPLIB.HLB[a]
DCL help
1005518701 1083021426
LANCP$HELP.HLB
LAN Control Program help
116169113163
LATCP$HELP.HLB
LAT Control Program help
157243157243
MAILHELP.HLB
Mail Utility help
211316211316
NCPHELP.HLB
Network Control Program help
262412262412
SDA.HLB
System Dump Analyzer help
384581384587
SHWCLHELP.HLB
Show Cluster Utility help
8812788127
SYSGEN.HLB
System Generation Utility help
369582366578
SYSMANHELP.HLB
System Management Utility help
539871559907
TPUHELP.HLB
Text Processing Utility help
5751036 5751015
UAFHELP.HLB
Authorize Utility help
253391249384
[SYSLIB] directory; Macro library files (.MLB)    
LANIDEF.MLB
LAN internal driver macros
196261196275
LIB.MLB
Operating system macros
3039525432265515
STARLET.MLB
Operating system macros
2558382725953576
[SYSLIB] directory; Object library files (.OLB)    
STARLET.OLB[a]
System object library and run-time library
306644985869916116397
VAXCRTL.OLB
HP C RTL routine name entry points; VAX G_floating double-precision, floating-point entry points
12711689Not included
VAXCRTLD.OLB
Limited support of VAX D_floating double-precision, floating-point entry points
17322802Not included
VAXCRTLDX.OLB
VAX D_floating support; support for /L_DOUBLE_SIZE=128 compiler qualifier
16632648Not included
VAXCRTLT.OLB
IEEE T_floating double-precision, floating-point entry points
15782491Not included
VAXCRTLTX.OLB
IEEE T_floating support; support for /L_DOUBLE_SIZE=128 compiler qualifier
15962493Not included
VAXCRTLX.OLB
G_floating support; support for /L_DOUBLE_SIZE=128 compiler qualifier
14222003Not included
VMS$VOLATILE_PRIVATE_INTERFACES.OLB
OpenVMS bugcheck processing codes
60187315192121
[SYSLIB] directory; Text library files (.TLB)    
BASIC$STARLET.TLB
BASIC language variant of the STARLET library, containing version-independent declarations for system services
3896812938658197
ERFLIB.TLB
ANALYZE ERROR device descriptions
6485Not included
LIB_ADA_SUBSET.TLB
Ada programmers toolkit of operating system definitions
1915353519143615
NTA.TLB
Windows NT definition files
34423452
STARLETPAS.TLB
Pascal language variant of the STARLET library, containing version-independent declarations for system services
3817895938028967
STARLET_RECENT_ADA_SUBSET.TLB
Ada programmers toolkit of operating system definitions
1144203011442058
STARLETSD.TLB
Language-independent STARLET definitions used during layered product installations
4328775842977936
SYS$LIB_C.TLB
C language variant of the LIB library, containing internal and version-dependent declarations for system services
10544222181735635869
SYS$STARLET_C.TLB
C language variant of the STARLET library, containing version-independent declarations for system services
632413694655914130
TOTALS:94141168857132963239525

[a] Layered products and user applications might add entries to the HELPLIB.HLB and STARLET.OLB libraries. The sizes listed in this table do not reflect such additional entries.

Installing Patches (Optional but Recommended)

HP recommends installing any relevant OpenVMS and networking patches that are available. Most patches are optional, but some layered products might require one or more patches on the system before their software is installed. For more information about patches that might be required on your system, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes, HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Release Notes, and the documentation provided for the relevant layered products.

As of Version 8.3 of OpenVMS, patch files are validated using the Secure Delivery feature. Each patch file includes an associated digital signature file (also referred to as a manifest) that is used to validate the patch file. This validation involves authenticating the originator (HP, in this case) and verifying the contents of the file.

Note:

HP strongly recommends backing up your system disk before installing patches.

To download and install OpenVMS patches, do the following:

  1. Create a directory on a nonsystem disk called [PATCHES] and set default to that directory.

  2. For OpenVMS Alpha systems, go to the following location (entering the letters in the case indicated) and down load the appropriate patches to the [PATCHES] directory:

    ftp://ftp.itrc.hp.com/openvms_patches/alpha/V8.4

    For OpenVMS I64 systems, goGo to the following location (entering the letters in the case indicated) and down load the appropriate patches to the [PATCHES] directory:

    ftp://ftp.itrc.hp.com/openvms_patches/i64/V8.3-1H1

  3. The patches are downloaded as compressed files. To decompress them, use the RUN command, as in the following example:

    $ RUN VMS831H1I_MX2-V0100.ZIPEXE

    This decompresses the patch into an installable file.

  4. Install the decompressed patches as described in the patch release notes.

Alternatively, you can access the ITRC site from your OpenVMS system and down load the patches as described in the following steps:

  1. Create a directory on a nonsystem disk called [PATCHES] and set default to that directory.

  2. Enter the following command at the system prompt:

    $ FTP FTP.ITRC.HP.COM
  3. Log in as an anonymous user (user name: anonymous). The password is your email address.

  4. Once you are logged in, enter the bin command at the FTP> prompt to get into binary mode, as in the following example. Binary mode is necessary for downloading patches correctly. Enter commands in this and the following steps in the exact case shown (lowercase or uppercase).

    FTP> bin
    200 Type is set to I.
  5. Enter the command PASSIVE ON, as in the following example:

    FTP> passive on
    Passive is on.
  6. On OpenVMS Alpha systems, to access the directory containing the V8.4 operating system patches, enter the following command, using the exact case indicated for each letter:

    FTP> cd openvms_patches/alpha/V8.4
    250 CWD command successful.

    On OpenVMS I64 systems, toTo access the directory containing the V8.3-1H1 operating system patches, enter the following command, using the exact case indicated for each letter:

    FTP> cd openvms_patches/i64/V8.3-1H1
    250 CWD command successful.

    To access the directory containing patches for layered products such as TCP/IP Services or DECnet, enter the following command (for Alpha systems, specify alpha in place of i64)::

    FTP> cd openvms_patches/layered_products/i64
    250 CWD command successful.
  7. Search for the patch you want by using the ls command, specifying a few unique letters of the patch name in uppercase (all patch names are in uppercase) surrounded by asterisks. For example, to look for a patch named VMS831H1I_MX2-V0100, enter the following command:

    FTP> ls *MX2*
    227 Entering Passive Mode (192,151,52,14,235,168)
    150 Opening ASCII mode data connection for file list.
    VMS831H1I_MX2-V0100.ZIPEXE
    VMS831H1I_MX2-V0100.txt
    
    226 Transfer complete.
    47 bytes received in 00:00:00.00 seconds (45.90 Kbytes/s)

    The .ZIPEXE file is the patch installation file; the .TXT file is the patch release notes (also included in the .ZIPEXE file). Alpha patches have a .PCSI-DCX_AXPEXE file extension.

  8. If the patch is an UPDATE patch or a TCP/IP patch, which can be very large files, you might want to enter the hash command as shown in the following example so that in the next step you can verify that the download is happening as expected (hash displays # symbols on the screen as the file is being downloaded).

    FTP> hash
    Hash mark printing on (1024/hash mark).
  9. When you find the patch file, use the get command to download the file, as in the following example. Remember that case is significant and all patch file names are in uppercase.

    FTP> get VMS831H1I_MX2-V0100.ZIPEXE
    227 Entering Passive Mode (192,6,165,75,248,228)
    150 Opening BINARY mode data connection for VMS831H1I_MZX2-V0100.ZIPEXE
    (36218732 bytes).
    #########################################################################
          .
          .
          .
    #########################################################################
    #########
    226 Transfer complete.
    local: USER5:[PATCHES]VMS831H1I_MX2-V0100.ZIPEXE;1
    remote: VMS831H1I_MX2-V0100.ZIPEXE
    2238464 bytes received in 00:00:01.29 seconds (1.65 Mbytes/s)
  10. Repeat steps 8 through 10 until you have downloaded all the patches you need.

  11. When you are finished, press Ctrl/Z to exit FTP and return to the DCL prompt.

  12. The patches are downloaded as compressed files. To decompress them, use the RUN command, as in the following example:

    $ RUN VMS831H1I_MX2-V0100.ZIPEXE

    This decompresses the patch into an installable file.

  13. Install the decompressed patches as described in the patch release notes.

Installing and Configuring Layered Products (New Installations, Some Upgrades)

The OpenVMS operating system kit includes several layered products. These include the System Integrated Product (SIP) kits for the following products that are installed automatically:

  • Availability Manager (base) for OpenVMS (required)

  • CDSA for OpenVMS (required)

  • Kerberos for OpenVMS (required)

  • SSL for OpenVMS (required)

  • Performance Data Collector base software, TDC_RT (required)

  • WBEM Services for OpenVMS (OpenVMS I64 only; required)

  • WBEM Providers for OpenVMS (OpenVMS I64 only; required)

These layered products also include the SIP kits for the following products that you can install optionally as part of the OpenVMS operating system installation:

  • DECwindows Motif for OpenVMS

  • DECnet-Plus for OpenVMS

  • DECnet Phase IV for OpenVMS

  • TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS

These layered products are included in the operating system media and can be installed using either the steps shown in this section or the alternative procedure described in Section . Other layered products—whether provided by HP on other CDs in the operating system distribution, in the Software Product Library CD set, or on a CD provided by a third-party company—should be installed using the steps shown in Section .

In addition to the SIPs, the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD includes kits for various products that are part of the OpenVMS OEs. HP does not support installing these OE product kits while booted from the OE DVD. To install these OE products, you must use the procedure described in Section .

As of Version 8.3, most PCSI kits included on the OpenVMS distribution media are signed using Secure Delivery. Signed PCSI kits that are installed from the OpenVMS I64 operating system distribution media are validated. (Kits installed from the OpenVMS Alpha operating system distribution CD are not validated; this restriction is due to space limitations of the distribution CD.) On both OpenVMS Alpha and I64 systems, signed Signed PCSI kits that you install subsequently are validated (including signed kits on the distribution media).

Note:

To use menu option 3, the target system must have the identical version of the OpenVMS operating system as the operating system media. If you need to install layered products on a target system that has a different version of the operating system, use the alternative procedure.

To use option 3 of the operating system menu, follow these steps:

  1. Before you install any layered products, be sure you back up the system disk.

  2. If you are not already booted from the operating system media, shut down the system and boot the operating system media. For instructions on how to shut down the OpenVMS I64 system, see Section ; for instructions on how to shut down the OpenVMS Alpha system, see Section .

  3. To view a list of products that can be installed, choose option 2 on the menu. If the layered product that you want to install is not listed in the display, install the product by using the alternative procedure described in Section , or see the documentation you received with the layered product. Note that HP does not support VMSINSTAL, PRODUCT INSTALL, or other PRODUCT commands from the DCL option on the operating system menu.

  4. To install layered products, choose option 3 on the menu. For more instructions, see Section .

  5. After the installation completes, shut down the system by selecting option 9 on the menu. When you boot the target system, the layered products you installed will be present.

For additional information about installing layered products, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual.

Alternative Procedure

Use this alternative procedure to install the following products:

  • Layered products on a target system that has a different operating system version than that of the operating system media (CD/DVD)

  • Layered products that require VMSINSTAL (indicated in the directories by save-set file names with file types of .A, .B, and so on)

  • OpenVMS I64 OE products

  • SIP kits (as an alternative to using menu option 3 of the operating system menu on the media)

  • Products on the Layered Products, Freeware, System Tools, and e-Business Integration and Infrastructure CDs

  • Third-party software products (such as database products, accounting software, and so forth)

For a list of layered products you can install, see the Software Product Descriptions included with your operating system kit. Note that some products require a license key (PAK) from HP.

Follow these steps:

  1. Before you install all your layered products, be sure you back up the system disk. In addition, ensure that a license has been loaded for the software. Note also that most layered products require changes to SYSGEN parameters or AUTHORIZE values, and to system files such as SYLOGICALS.COM, SYLOGIN.COM, and SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM. For more information, see the following:

    • Installation guides for these layered products

    • HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials

    • Section  in this manual

    • Section  in this manual

  2. After your target system disk runs AUTOGEN and boots (if necessary), mount the OpenVMS operating system media. For example, if the device with the operating system media is DKA400:, use the following command:

    $ MOUNT/OVERRIDE=IDENTIFICATION DKA400
  3. Locate the directories and files containing the available layered products. For example, if the device name is DKA400:, enter the following command:

    $ DIRECTORY /NOHEAD/NOTRAIL DKA400:[*.KIT]

    You can use the PRODUCT FIND command to locate kits by using the PCSI utility. For example:

    $ PRODUCT FIND * /SOURCE=DKA400:[*.KIT]
  4. To install layered products that require VMSINSTAL (indicated in the directories by save-set file names with file types of .A, .B, and so on), enter the @SYS$UPDATE:VMSINSTAL command and then specify the device name and directory at the prompt. For example:

    $ @SYS$UPDATE:VMSINSTAL
    * Where will the distribution volumes be mounted:  DKA400:[DIAA032.KIT]

    To install layered products that require the PCSI utility (indicated in the directories by file names with file types of .PCSI or .PCSI$COMPRESSED), use the PRODUCT INSTALL command to specify the device name and directory. Following is an example of the PRODUCT INSTALL command on an I64 system:

       $ PRODUCT INSTALL FORTRAN /SOURCE=DKB400:[I64_FORT075.KIT]

Reinstall DECevent Software (Alpha Upgrades only; optional)

The optional DECevent software is automatically removed during an OpenVMS upgrade. If you want to continue using the DECevent product, you must manually install this software after the upgrade has completed.

Note:

On OpenVMS I64 systems and recent versions of OpenVMS Alpha, DECevent functionality and more is provided by Web-Based Enterprises Services (WEBES). More information about this tool is available at the following webiste:

http://h18000.www1.hp.com/support/svctools/

Creating Print Queues (New Installations, Some Upgrades)

If you have a large number of print queues to add and you need to get the system in use quickly, you can set up one print queue per area or work group and then add the other print queues later, after the user accounts are added (Section ). For more information about adding print queues, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Updating SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM to Start Layered Products and Print Queues

After installing and configuring any layered products and adding new print queues, you should update the SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM file to start these products and print queues. For more about updating the SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM file, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Creating Accounts (New Installations, Some Upgrades)

During installation, DEFAULT and SYSTEM accounts are created automatically. You should create additional user accounts now. If you plan to have HP service representatives test your system or if you plan to run testing software such as UETP, you must create accounts for each representative and a SYSTEST (standalone system) or SYSTEST_CLIG (OpenVMS Cluster system) account to run UETP.

For complete information about creating and managing user accounts and about creating accounts for HP service representatives and UETP, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Testing the System with UETP (Optional)

The User Environment Test Package (UETP) is a software package that tests whether the OpenVMS operating system is installed correctly. It tests the hardware, including disk drives, tape drives, CD drives, line printers (if any), network cards, and so forth. Running UETP is optional; HP recommends that you run UETP after an installation or if new hardware was added as part of an upgrade.

Before using UETP, you must create a SYSTEST (standalone system) or SYSTEST_CLIG (OpenVMS Cluster system) account. You should also create an account for HP service representatives to use. You can use the CREATE_SPECIAL_ACCOUNTS.COM file to create these accounts, as explained in HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

For complete information about using UETP, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

Backing Up the Customized System Disk and Initiating Systematic Backups

After you customize the OpenVMS operating system to your satisfaction and perform the other steps recommended thus far in this chapter that are relevant to your system, protect your work by making a standalone backup copy of the system disk to tape. To do so, follow the instructions in Section . If you are going to be saving to disk, specify a disk that will not be (or is not) part of a shadow set.

For complete information about backup operations, including a description of an alternative method that does not require booting from the operating system media, see Appendix F.

HP also recommends creating a systematic routine for backing up the application, data, and user disks. For more information, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Reforming the Shadow Set as Final Postupgrade Backup

If your system disk participates in a volume shadowing environment, re-form the shadow set again to generate another shadow copy onto the other disks in the set. To do so, follow the instructions in Section .

Rebooting Cluster Members (Upgrades Only)

If you are performing a rolling upgrade in an OpenVMS Cluster environment and have completed all the postupgrade tasks required thus far for your upgraded system disk, reboot each system that boots from that system disk.

For more information about booting your system, see Appendix A for OpenVMS Alpha systems and Appendix B for OpenVMS I64 systems.

At this point, your system is ready for general use.

Running AUTOGEN to Tune the System

When you install or upgrade the OpenVMS operating system, the system executes the AUTOGEN.COM procedure to set the values of system parameters and the sizes of the page, swap, and dump files according to the system configuration.

After running your system for at least 24 hours with users or a typical application workload on the system, run the AUTOGEN.COM procedure again to tune the system properly. Run AUTOGEN as follows. (In an OpenVMS Cluster, you must follow these steps to run AUTOGEN on each cluster node.)

  1. Run AUTOGEN in feedback mode, examine AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT, and reboot the system. To run AUTOGEN in feedback mode, use the following command:

    $ @SYS$UPDATE:AUTOGEN SAVPARAMS SETPARAMS FEEDBACK

    To view AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT on your screen, enter the following command:

    $ TYPE SYS$SYSTEM:AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT

    You can print this file or examine it using the EDIT/READ_ONLY command.

    If the report includes a message similar to the following, you might need to modify the size of the page, swap, or dump file:

    %AUTOGEN-W-DSKSPC, The disk on which DKA0:[SYS0.SYSEXE]PAGEFILE.SYS
       resides would be over 95% full if it were modified to hold 20000 blocks.

    For more information about AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

  2. Run AUTOGEN again in feedback mode two work days later and examine AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT, and then reboot the system. (For information about the importance of having a current AGEN$FEEDBACK.DAT file, see Section .)

  3. HP recommends that you run AUTOGEN from the SAVPARAMS phase through the TESTFILES phase weekly thereafter until the system stabilizes (that is, until AUTOGEN finds nothing that needs to be adjusted). Make sure you run AUTOGEN when your system is running under a typical workload. Examine AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT to determine the need for additional changes.

    Important:

    If you start AUTOGEN without specifying the execution-mode parameter (FEEDBACK, NOFEEDBACK, or CHECK_FEEDBACK), AUTOGEN uses the feedback information in its calculations. However, if the feedback information reflects system up time of less than 24 hours, or if the feedback information is more than 30 days old, AUTOGEN includes warnings in the AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT file to alert you to potential problems with the feedback data. If you wrongly assume the feedback is valid, the parameter settings might vary significantly from your expectations.

    If you specify FEEDBACK (or NOFEEDBACK), AUTOGEN uses (or does not use) the feedback regardless of the data’s reliability. AUTOGEN proceeds through the SETPARAMS phase (if you specified SETPARAMS, SHUTDOWN, or REBOOT as the end phase) and sets system parameters to the values it computed.

    If you specify CHECK_FEEDBACK, AUTOGEN checks the validity of the feedback data. If AUTOGEN determines the feedback is suspect, then AUTOGEN ignores the feedback when computing parameter values. It stops at the TESTFILES phase and issues a warning in the report that parameters have not been changed. You must read the report and decide whether the calculated values are acceptable. You can either use them (by running the AUTOGEN SETPARAMS phase) or rerun AUTOGEN with valid feedback data.

  4. After the system has stabilized, HP recommends that you run AUTOGEN at least monthly to save feedback information for future use. Use the following command:

    $ @SYS$UPDATE:AUTOGEN SAVPARAMS

    If you do not maintain current feedback information for AUTOGEN, you will not have the needed information the next time you upgrade your system. As a result, you may have to reboot and rerun AUTOGEN several times to make your upgraded system operational.

For more information about running AUTOGEN, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

Modifying System Parameters

Based on your examination of AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT, you might need to modify parameter values in MODPARAMS.DAT. Read the notes in Section . These notes apply to modifications being made after a new installation and after an upgrade. If you are modifying system parameters after an upgrade, also see Section .

General Notes About Modifying System Parameters

When modifying system parameters, note the following:

  • In general, let AUTOGEN calculate system parameters. You can hardcode values (such as GBLPAGES=value), but doing so overrides AUTOGEN and might not allow it to set an optimal value based on observed usage.

  • Whenever possible, use MIN_parameter values (such as MIN_GBLPAGES) to set the minimum value that can be set for a parameter by AUTOGEN. AUTOGEN increases the value if necessary. It also adjusts related parameters unless they are hardcoded, in which case information is provided in the AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT file. Use MAX_parameter values to set a maximum value when it is necessary to limit a parameter to a known maximum value (this is rarely necessary).

  • Enter numeric values as integers without commas (for example, 10000). Enter alphabetic characters in lower or uppercase.

  • HP recommends that you include comments in the MODPARAMS.DAT file indicating who changed the value, when it was done, and why it was done. An exclamation point (!) serves as a comment starter and can appear anywhere on a line. The following example illustrates the modifications recommended in the preceding bulleted items:

    ! the following changes made by K.Newcomb on 9/20/03
    !
    SWAPFILE=0                   ! don’t re-size the SWAPFILE on AUTOGEN runs
    MIN_gblsections=750          ! required for DECwindows MOTIF
    MIN_NPAGEDYN=2750000         ! set npagedyn to a min of 2.75 million

For more information about the MODPARAMS.DAT file and about using AUTOGEN in general, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

Modifying System Parameters After an Upgrade

Review the file SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT. The upgrade procedure created a new version of this file. The old version is named SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT_OLD. The new MODPARAMS.DAT file contains all the parameters in the old file, plus various parameters that the upgrade procedure added to ensure that all necessary system parameters are properly propagated from the earlier version of OpenVMS. The upgrade procedure also adds comment lines to explain the source of the parameters in each section of the new MODPARAMS.DAT file.

Note that the old MODPARAMS.DAT is included in the new MODPARAMS.DAT each time an upgrade is performed. Because of this, if MODPARAMS.DAT is not reviewed and cleaned up after each upgrade, it might eventually contain many levels of duplicated parameters. For this reason, you should review MODPARAMS.DAT after each upgrade. This enables you to eliminate any duplication. You can also take this opportunity to modify any parameters, if necessary.

Based on your examination of AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT, you might need to modify parameter values in MODPARAMS.DAT.

The following subsections are examples of instances where you need to modify parameters in MODPARAMS.DAT.

System File Sizes

AUTOGEN sets the following files at sizes appropriate for your system:

  • [SYSEXE]SYSDUMP.DMP

  • [SYSEXE]PAGEFILE.SYS

  • [SYSEXE]SWAPFILE.SYS

If you have special workloads or configurations, you can specify different sizes for these files by performing the following steps:

  1. Log in to the SYSTEM account.

  2. Enter the following command:

    $ @SYS$UPDATE:AUTOGEN SAVPARAMS TESTFILES
  3. If the file sizes displayed need to be adjusted, add symbols to the MODPARAMS.DAT file (described in detail in the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems), and repeat step 2 until you are satisfied with the file sizes.

  4. When you are satisfied with the file sizes, enter the following command to ensure that the modified system files are installed when the system is rebooted:

    $ @SYS$UPDATE:AUTOGEN GENPARAMS SETPARAMS

OpenVMS Cluster Parameters

If you are upgrading an OpenVMS Cluster system, note the following:

  • The upgrade procedure creates a new MODPARAMS.DAT for each system root on your system disk. Normally, there is one root for each computer that boots from the system disk. You must review and adjust each of these MODPARAMS.DAT files individually.

    The MODPARAMS.DAT file for the system on which you are running is located in the SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSEXE]MODPARAMS.DAT file. The MODPARAMS.DAT files for other roots on the same system disk can be found in SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SYSx.SYSEXE]MODPARAMS.DAT, where x represents the root number; for example, SYS0, SYS1, SYS2, and so forth. (Valid root numbers might include hexadecimal digits—SYSA, SYSB, and so forth.)

  • Be sure the EXPECTED_VOTES value is correct. This value is the sum of all votes in the cluster. For example, if there are five computers in the cluster and each has one vote, the value is 5.

Appendix A Booting and Shutting Down Your OpenVMS Alpha System

This appendix applies to Alpha systems only and explains how to halt, boot, and shut down the operating system. It also includes related information, such as setting the system for automatic booting and using the Writeboot utility. This appendix also includes brief troubleshooting procedures.

This appendix contains the following information:

  • Booting operations, including the following:

    • Booting the operating system CD locally and from an InfoServer system

    • Booting manually from the system disk

    • Performing a conversational (interactive) boot

    • Booting with minimum startup

    • Booting with the XDelta utility (XDELTA)

    • Booting from a different directory

    • Booting with a PMAZB or PMAZC TURBOchannel adapter

    • Booting over the network with an alternate TURBOchannel adapter

    • Booting in an emergency

  • Set, Show, and WRITEBOOT operations, including the following:

    • Setting the system for automatic booting

    • Setting and showing boot devices

    • Setting boot parameters

    • Writing a new boot block

  • Halt and shutdown operations

  • Troubleshooting procedures

For the latest hardware documentation for Alpha computers, see the documents at:

http://www.hp.com/go/alphadocs

Booting Operations

The following sections describe different methods of booting your OpenVMS Alpha system.

Booting the OpenVMS Alpha Operating System CD

If you need to boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD, either to perform an installation or upgrade or to perform related operations such as mounting or backing up the system disk, perform the steps in the following sections, depending on whether you are booting locally or from the InfoServer.

Booting from the Local Drive

Boot from the local drive as follows:

  1. Insert the operating system CD into the local CD drive.

  2. At the console prompt (>>>), enter the SHOW DEVICE command so you can identify the name of the CD drive (for example, DKA400:)

  3. Enter the boot command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 source-drive

    Substitute the device name of the CD drive (as listed in the SHOW DEVICE display) for source-drive.

    For example, if the SHOW DEVICE display lists the device name of your CD drive as DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 DKA400

After you boot, the system displays a menu from which you can choose options to perform the following tasks:

  • Install or upgrade the operating system using the PCSI utility.

  • Enter a DCL environment from which you can perform preinstallation or maintenance tasks such as mounting or showing devices and backing up or restoring files on the system disk.

  • Shut down the system.

Booting from the InfoServer

To boot the operating system CD using either the InfoServer hardware or the InfoServer utility, follow these steps. To use the InfoServer utility, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only), as described in Appendix C; note that the operating system CD must be mounted systemwide.

  1. At the console prompt (>>>), enter the SHOW DEVICE command and scan the devices listed in the output to determine the name of the CD drive. Look for a device listed with its hardware address, as in the last line of the following example; compare this information with that provided by the table in step 2.

    >>> SHOW DEVICE
    
    dva0.0.0.1000.0    DVA0                     RX23
    dka200.2.0.5.0     DKA200                   RZ28M  1004
    dka300.3.0.5.0     DKA300                   RZ29B  0016
    dka400.4.0.5.0     DKA400                   RZ26L  442E
    ewa0.0.0.3.0       EWA0         00-00-F8-1F-70-3D

    For additional information, see the HP OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 and HP OpenVMS I64 Version 8.3-1H1 Software Product Description (SPD 82.35.xx) and the hardware manuals that you received with your Alpha computer.

  2. At the console prompt, enter the following command, where lan-device-name is the LAN device (for example, EWA0) identified with your computer:

    >>> B -FLAGS 0,0 -FILE APB_083 lan-device-name

    For information about the LAN devices your system supports, see Table A.1. Ethernet device EWA0 refers to the first EW device. Subsequent devices are named EWB0, EWC0, and so on. For most systems, you can use the SHOW CONFIGURATION console command to list LAN devices available for boot. For additional information, see the hardware manuals that you received with your Alpha computer and the OpenVMS software product description (SPD). The APB file name in the previous command is the unique file name that was assigned to the APB.EXE file when it was copied from the operating system CD to the InfoServer. This file is the name of the APB program used for the initial system load (ISL) boot program.

    Supported LAN Devices

    Alpha ComputerEthernet DeviceFDDI Device

    ALPHAbook 1

    EOA0

    -

    AlphaServer 400 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer 1000 series

    ERA0, EWA0

    FRA0

    AlphaServer 1000A series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer 1200 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer 2000 series

    ERA0, EWA0

    FRA0

    AlphaServer 2100, 2100A series

    ERA0, EWA0

    FRA0

    AlphaServer 4100 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer 8200 series

    EXA0, EWA0

    FXA0

    AlphaServer 8400 series

    EXA0, EWA0

    FXA0

    AlphaStation 200 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaStation 400 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaStation 500 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaStation 600 series

    ERA0, EWA0

    FWA0

    DEC 2000 series

    ERA0

    DEC 3000 series

    ESA0

    "n/ESA0"

    DEC 4000 series

    EZA0

    DEC 7000 series

    EXA0

    FXA0

    DEC 10000 series

    EXA0

    FXA0

    DIGITAL Personal Workstation (DPWS) series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer DS15

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer DS20

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer DS20e

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer DS25

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer ES40

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer ES45

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer ES47

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer ES80

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS60

    EWA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS80

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS140

    EWA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS160

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS320

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS1280

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    Note:

    Note the following about devices and computers listed in Table A.1:

    1. The console LAN device EGA0 is the Gigabit Ethernet device DEGXA. OpenVMS refers to this device as an EW device rather than an EG device. To correlate the console device names for EG and EW devices, compare the MAC address listed for each device by the console and by the LANCP SHOW CONFIGURATION commands.

    2. If you are using a DEC 3000 or 4000 series system, note the following:

      • On DEC 3000 series systems, you can boot through the InfoServer with an Ethernet PMAD device or FDDI DEFTA device by specifying the device name as “n/ESA0”. The value for n is the TURBOchannel slot number, which you can obtain by entering the SHOW CONFIGURATION command at the console prompt (>>>) and examining the display. For more information, see Section .

      • On DEC 4000 series systems, you must specify the ISL file name in uppercase (for example, APB_083).

  3. The InfoServer ISL program then displays the following menu:

       
     Network Initial System Load Function
     Version 1.2
    
    
      FUNCTION         FUNCTION
        ID
        1     -        Display Menu
        2     -        Help
        3     -        Choose Service
        4     -        Select Options
        5     -        Stop
    
     Enter a function ID value:
  4. Respond to the prompts as follows, and press Enter after each entry:

    1. Enter 3 for the function ID.

    2. Enter 2 for the option ID.

    3. Enter the service name (ALPHA083 is the default service name for the InfoServer hardware; for the InfoServer utility, ask your system or network manager for the service name).

    A sample display follows:

     Enter a function ID value: 3
      OPTION          OPTION
        ID
        1     -       Find Services
        2     -       Enter known Service Name
    
     Enter an Option ID value: 2
     Enter a Known Service Name: ALPHA083

After you boot, the system displays a menu from which you can choose options to perform the such tasks as the following:

  • Install or upgrade the operating system using the PCSI utility.

  • Enter a DCL environment from which you can perform preinstallation or maintenance tasks such as mounting or showing devices and backing up or restoring files on the system disk.

  • Shut down the system.

Note:

If you boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD from an InfoServer but lose your connection during the installation or upgrade procedure (the system is unresponsive and pressing Ctrl/Y does not return you to the menu), do the following:

IF ... THEN ...

You previously chose the INITIALIZE option

  1. Reboot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD.

  2. Choose the install/upgrade option (1) on the menu and perform the installation or upgrade procedure again.

You previously chose the PRESERVE option

  1. Reboot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD.

  2. Enter the DCL environment by choosing option 8 on the menu.

  3. Mount the device containing your backup copy of the target disk and the device that is your target disk.

  4. Restore the backup copy of your target disk by entering the appropriate BACKUP commands. (See Appendix F for complete information about using MOUNT and BACKUP commands to restore a system disk.)

  5. Log out from the DCL environment.

  6. Choose the install/upgrade option (1) on the menu and perform the installation or upgrade procedure again.

Booting with a PMAZB or PMAZC TURBOchannel Adapter

PMAZB and PMAZC TURBOchannel adapters are adapters that are software-compatible with the integrated SCSI ports on DEC 3000 Alpha series systems. If your system is not a DEC 3000 Alpha series system, skip to the next section.

The DEC 3000 Alpha series system consoles implement the SHOW CONFIGURATION console command, which displays information about the TURBOchannel options and the built-in adapters in the system. When a PMAZB or PMAZC adapter is installed in the TURBOchannel, the SHOW CONFIGURATION command displays the “PMAZB-AA” or “PMAZC-AA” string, the TURBOchannel slot number, and the device status.

The DEC 3000 Alpha series consoles also implement the SHOW DEVICE command, which displays information about the devices in the system. Because the integrated SCSI adapter is built into every DEC 3000 Alpha series system, the SHOW DEVICE console command can display the SCSI devices connected to the integrated SCSI ports. However, the SHOW DEVICE console command cannot display the SCSI devices connected to the PMAZB or PMAZC SCSI ports.

To make the console display the devices connected to the PMAZB or PMAZC SCSI ports, enter the following command at the console prompt, wherex is the TURBOchannel slot number in which the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter is installed:

>>> TEST TCx CNFG

This command displays the devices that are connected to each SCSI port of the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter. The device controller letters are either A or B, based upon the PMAZB or PMAZC ports to which the devices are connected. Do not confuse these devices with any DKAxxx or DKBxxx devices displayed by the SHOW DEVICE command, which shows SCSI devices on the integrated SCSI ports only.

To boot from a device connected to a PMAZB or PMAZC adapter, enter the boot command as follows:

>>> BOOT "x/dkyzzz"

The following conventions are used:

  • x is the TURBOchannel slot number in which the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter is installed.

  • dk is the device code of the boot device.

  • y is either A or B, depending on the SCSI port of the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter that contains the boot device.

  • zzz is the SCSI unit number of the boot device.

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system does not distinguish between the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter and the integrated SCSI adapter. The operating system views them as identical adapters. Because the operating system searches for I/O adapters in backplane slot number order, device controller letters are assigned that correspond to the backplane order of the TURBOchannel options, followed by the integrated adapters. This is different from console SCSI device naming, which always designates SCSI devices on the integrated SCSI ports as either A or B port devices.

On a DEC 3000 Model 500 Alpha system with no TURBOchannel options installed, the OpenVMS Alpha operating system names the integrated SCSI ports PKA0 and PKB0, and the devices connected to the ports inherit the controller letter from the port controller letter (A or B). However, if a PMAZB or PMAZC adapter is installed in the TURBOchannel, the operating system names the PMAZB or PMAZC SCSI ports PKA0 and PKB0 and names the integrated SCSI ports PKC0 and PKD0. The devices connected to the ports inherit the controller letter from the port controller letter (A, B, C, or D).

Booting Manually from the System Disk

Boot the system disk manually as follows:

IF ...THEN GO TO...

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is running

Step 1

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is not running

Step 4

  1. Log in to the SYSTEM account.

  2. Enter the following command and press Enter:

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
  3. Answer the questions displayed by the system. When the procedure asks whether an automatic reboot should be performed, press Enter for NO. When the procedure is finished, it displays the following message:

       SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE
  4. Halt the system by pressing either Ctrl/P or Halt. (See Section for more information about how to halt your Alpha computer.)

  5. Enter the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT device-name

    Substitute the device name of the system disk for device-name. For example, to boot from a drive with a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>> BOOT DKA400

    To boot from the network, enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>> BOOT ESA0

Performing a Conversational (Interactive) Boot

A conversational boot is most commonly used in research and development environments and during software upgrades. Perform a conversational boot to stop the boot process before it completes. The boot process stops after it loads SYS$SYSTEM:SYSBOOT.EXE and displays the SYSBOOT> prompt. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, you can enter specific OpenVMS System Generation utility (SYSGEN) commands to do the following:

  • Examine system parameter values

  • Change system parameter values

  • Specify another parameter file

  • Specify another system startup command procedure

  • Select the default system parameter file (ALPHAVMSSYS.PAR) if you modified system parameters to values that render the system unbootable

  • Specify a minimum startup

There are several ways to perform a conversational boot. The following procedure is the most direct:

IF ... THEN GO TO...

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is running

Step 1

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is not running

Step 4

  1. Log in to the SYSTEM account.

  2. Enter the following command and press Enter:

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
  3. Answer the questions displayed by the system. When the procedure asks whether an automatic reboot should be performed, press Enter for NO. When the procedure is finished, it displays the following message:

    SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE
  4. Halt the system by pressing either Ctrl/P or Halt. (For more information about how to halt your Alpha computer, see Section .)

  5. To begin the conversational boot, enter the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    for device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400

    If you do not specify a device name, the system boots from the boot device assigned when you entered the SET BOOTDEF_DEV command.

  6. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, you can enter any of the SYSGEN commands listed in Table A.2. For more information about these SYSGEN commands, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: M-Z.

  7. When you finish using the SYSGEN commands, enter the CONTINUE command to complete the boot process.

    SYSGEN Commands Used in the SYSBOOT Procedure

    Command Description

    CONTINUE

    Resumes the boot procedure.

    DISABLE CHECKS

    Inhibits checking of parameter values specified with the SET command.

    ENABLE CHECKS

    Permits checking of parameter values specified with the SET command.

    HELP

    Displays a summary of the SYSBOOT commands on the terminal screen.

    SET parameter-name

    Establishes the value of a system parameter.

    SET/STARTUP

    Sets the name of the system startup command procedure.

    SHOW [parameter]

    Displays active, current, default, maximum, and minimum values for specific parameters. (Use qualifiers to display characteristics of parameters grouped by categories.)

    USE [file-spec]

    Specifies a parameter file to be used as a source of values. You must enter the entire file specification, including device and directory; you cannot specify a logical name.

For examples of using conversational booting, see Section  and Section .

Booting with Minimum Startup

In certain cases, you might want to boot your system without performing the full sequence of startup events. For example, if a startup event prevents you from logging in, you might want to boot the system without executing the startup so that you can log in and fix the problem. You can use the conversational boot to specify a minimum startup.

Note:

Because this procedure bypasses specific startup operations, it does not autoconfigure the system's peripheral devices.

Boot the system with minimum startup as follows:

  1. Begin the conversational boot by entering the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    For device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400
  2. Enter the following command and press Enter:

    SYSBOOT> SET STARTUP_P1 "MIN"
  3. Enter the following command to ensure that the operating system does not record for subsequent system reboots the STARTUP_P1 parameter change you made in step 2:

    SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
  4. Enter the following command to continue booting:

    SYSBOOT> CONTINUE

Booting with the XDelta Utility (XDELTA)

The XDelta utility (XDELTA) is a debugging tool that system programmers use. The procedure for booting all Alpha computers with XDELTA is the same.

The following table describes the valid values you can specify when booting with XDELTA:

ValueSystem Response

0

Normal, nonstop boot (default).

1

Begins a conversational boot and then displays the SYSBOOT prompt.

2

Includes XDELTA but does not take the initial breakpoint.

3

Displays the SYSBOOT prompt and includes XDELTA but does not take the initial breakpoint.

6

Includes XDELTA and takes the initial breakpoint.

7

Includes XDELTA, displays the SYSBOOT prompt, and takes the initial breakpoint at system initialization.

The following is an example of booting with XDELTA from the console prompt:

>>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,7

For more information about using XDELTA, see the HP OpenVMS Delta/XDelta Debugger Manual.

Booting from a Different Root Directory

By default, the OpenVMS Alpha operating system is installed in the system root directory [SYS0]. However, if you have created a cluster system disk, you can use the SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG.COM procedure to add a copy of the operating system to a different root directory. (See the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual for more information about using the SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG.COM procedure.)

To boot from a different directory (for example, [SYS3]), enter the BOOT command as follows:

>>> BOOT -FLAGS 3,0  DKA200

Booting over the Network with an Alternate TURBOchannel Adapter

You can use an alternate TURBOchannel adapter to boot a DEC 3000 series Alpha computer (with the TURBOchannel option) over the network in an InfoServer or OpenVMS Cluster environment. Examples of alternate TURBOchannel adapters are the PMAD (which connects to the Ethernet) and the DEFTA (which connects to the FDDI).

To boot from a TURBOchannel device connected to one of these alternate adapters, enter the boot command as follows:

>>> BOOT "n/ESA0"

The value for n is the TURBOchannel slot number for the device, which you can obtain by entering the SHOW CONFIGURATION command at the console prompt (>>>) and examining the display. In the following example, the TURBOchannel slot number (listed under the “TCINFO” column) is 0:

>>> SHOW CONFIGURATION
DEC 3000 - M300
Digital Equipment Corporation
  VPP PAL X5.56-80800101/OSF PAL X1.34-80800201 - Built on 18-DEC-1996 11:376
               
            TCINFO     DEVNAM     DEVSTAT
            ------     --------   --------
              CPU      OK KN16-AA -V3.2-S6CD-I151-sV2.0-DECchip 21064 P3.0-150
             ASIC      OK
              MEM      OK
              MEM      OK
6
              CXT      OK
5
              NVR      OK
              SCC      OK
               NI      OK
             ISDN      OK
4
             SCSI      OK
0-PMAD-AA    TC0

Booting in an Emergency

If a system problem prevents your system from booting, you might need to perform an emergency boot operation. Table A.3 summarizes these emergency boot operations, and the sections that follow describe each boot operation in more detail.

Emergency Boot Procedures

OperationWhen to Use

Booting with default system parameters

When parameter values in the parameter file have been modified so that the system is unbootable

Booting without startup and login procedures

If an error in the startup or login procedure prevents you from logging in

Booting without the user authorization file

If you have forgotten the password and cannot log in to a privileged account

Booting with Default System Parameters

If the current values stored in the parameter file have been incorrectly modified, these incorrect values might cause the system to become unbootable. With a conversational boot operation, you can reset the active values for all system parameters to the default value. (In most cases, HP recommends that you use AUTOGEN to modify system parameters. In certain cases, however, you can use a conversational boot to modify a parameter value temporarily. To change a parameter value permanently, you must edit MODPARAMS.DAT and run AUTOGEN. For instructions, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.) The default values allow you to boot the system temporarily so you can correct the problem.

How to Perform This Task
  1. Begin the conversational boot by entering the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    For device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400
  2. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, enter the following command:

    SYSBOOT> USE DEFAULT

    The USE DEFAULT command specifies that default values should be used for all parameters.

  3. To avoid starting all layered products on a system that is not tuned for them, possibly causing the system to hang, set the STARTUP_P1 system parameter as follows:

    SYSBOOT> SET STARTUP_P1 “MIN”
  4. Enter the following command to ensure that the operating system does not record for subsequent system reboots the STARTUP_P1 parameter change you made in step 3:

    SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
  5. Enter the following command to continue booting:

    SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
  6. When the system finishes booting, determine which changed parameter caused the problem and reset the parameter value. If you specified the value for the parameter in the AUTOGEN parameter file MODPARAMS.DAT, fix the value in that file and run AUTOGEN. For more information, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

  7. After your system runs for at least 24 hours, run AUTOGEN in feedback mode, following the steps described in Section . Be sure to examine the AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT, as recommended. If necessary, modify system parameters as instructed in Section . If you need assistance, contact your software support representative. Once you feel confident that the problem is corrected, and AUTOGEN has been run through the SETPARAMS phase, reboot the system.

Example
SYSBOOT> USE DEFAULT
SYSBOOT> SET STARTUP_P1 “MIN”
SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
SYSBOOT> CONTINUE 
Username: SYSTEM
Password:
$ EDIT SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT
   .
   .
   .
   [Insert line(s) to reset parameter value(s)]
   .
   .
   .

Booting Without Startup and Login Procedures

If the system does not complete the startup procedures or does not allow you to log in, you might need to bypass the startup and login procedures. The startup and login procedures provided by HP should always work. However, if you introduce an error when modifying the startup or login procedure, it is possible to accidentally lock yourself out of the system.

How to Perform This Task
  1. Begin the conversational boot by entering the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    For device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400
  2. Enter the following command at the SYSBOOT> prompt:

    SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
  3. Enter the following command to ensure that the operating system does not record for subsequent system reboots the STARTUP_P1 parameter change you made in step 2:

    SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
  4. Enter the following command to continue booting:

    SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
  5. When the system is booted, the operator console displays the DCL command prompt ($). You are logged in.

  6. Enter the following DCL command:

    $ SET NOON

    This command directs the operating system to ignore any errors that might occur. If you do not enter this command and you invoke an error, the system logs you out.

  7. Correct the error condition that caused the login failure. (That is, make the necessary repairs to the startup or login procedure, or to the SYSUAF.DAT file.)

    Use a text editor to correct the startup or login file. Note that some system consoles might not supply a screen-mode editor. You can also copy a corrected file and delete the incorrect version by using the RENAME and DELETE commands.

  8. Perform a normal startup by entering the following command:

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP
Example

SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
$ SET NOON
$ SET DEFAULT SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSEXE]
$ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP

Booting Without the User Authorization File

Ordinarily, the startup and login procedures provided by HP always work; however, certain conditions can cause them to fail. A simple way to lock yourself out of the system is to set passwords to login accounts and forget them. Another way to be locked out is if one or more core system Product Authorization Key (PAK) software licenses are unavailable or expired. In such emergencies, perform a conversational emergency boot by performing the steps given in this section.

How to Perform This Task
  1. Halt the system by pressing Ctrl/P or whatever method is used for your computer. (See Section  for more information about how to halt Alpha computer systems.)

  2. Begin the conversational boot by entering the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    For device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400

    If your system has a hardware password (various systems support a password that prevents unauthorized access to the console), you need this password for logging in to the console. If you do not have this password, contact HP customer support to reset the hardware console password.

  3. Enter the following commands at the SYSBOOT> prompt:

    SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
    SYSBOOT> SET WINDOW_SYSTEM 0
    SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
    SYSBOOT> CONTINUE

    The first three commands request that:

    • OpenVMS read the system startup commands directly from the system console

    • The Windows system (if any) not start

    • OpenVMS not record the parameter changes for subsequent system reboots

    The last command causes the booting to continue.

  4. At the DCL prompt, the system now accepts startup commands directly from the console. Enter the following two commands as shown. These commands allow a normal system startup while you are left logged in on the console. Without the SPAWN command, you would be logged out when the startup completes.

    $ SPAWN
    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP
  5. Once you log out of this session, the system completes the startup and can be used normally. Optionally, you can choose to reboot the system.

Note:

Instead of using the SET/STARTUP OPA0: command, an alternative method of booting under these emergency conditions is to set the UAFALTERNATE system parameter to use the alternate authorization file rather than the standard user authorization file. Setting the system parameter UAFALTERNATE defines the logical name SYSUAF to refer to the file SYS$SYSTEM:SYSUAFALT.DAT. If this file is found during a normal login, the system uses it to validate the account and prompts you for the user name and password.

HP does not recommend this method. If an alternate SYSUAFALT.DAT file has been configured on your system, the UAFALTERNATE method will likely fail (assuming you do not know the password for the privileged account stored within the SYSUAFALT.DAT file). In addition, the OPA0: system console is critical to system operations and system security and allows access when the SYSUAF system authorization database is unavailable or corrupted; when core product license PAKs are not registered, are expired, or are disabled; and in various system failures.

Example

SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
SYSBOOT> SET WINDOW_SYSTEM 0
SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
$ SPAWN
$ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP
$

Configuring Boot Behavior for Alpha Systems

The following sections describe how to set up automatic booting, set and show the default boot device, modify boot parameters, and create a bootable OpenVMS Alpha system disk using the Writeboot utility.

Setting the System for Automatic Booting

Alpha computers can boot automatically from a designated boot device. When you installed the OpenVMS Alpha operating system, you designated the system disk as the default boot device. Section  describes how to change the default boot device.

Alpha computers can boot automatically from the default boot device under the following conditions:

  • When you first turn on system power

  • When system power comes on after a power failure

  • After you shut down the system (if you enter Y when the shutdown procedure asks whether an automatic reboot should be performed)

  • After a bugcheck or system crash

  • If the system halts under program control

Set the system to boot automatically by performing one of the following steps:

IF ...THEN GO TO...

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is running

Step 1

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is not running

Step 4

  1. Log in to the SYSTEM account.

  2. Enter the following command and press Enter:

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
  3. Answer the questions displayed by the system. When the procedure asks whether an automatic reboot should be performed, press Enter for NO. When the procedure is finished, it displays the following message:

       SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE 
  4. Halt the system by pressing either Ctrl/P or Halt. (See Section  for more information about how to halt your Alpha computer.)

  5. If you have an SMP system with multiple CPUs, enter the following command at the console prompt (>>>) to stop the other CPUs:

    >>> INITIALIZE
  6. Enter the following command to show whether the system has been set to boot automatically:

    >>> SHOW AUTO_ACTION

    The system displays one of the following:

    • Restart

    • Boot

    • Halt

  7. Enter the SET AUTO_ACTION command if you want to change the automatic booting behavior. HP recommends that AUTO_ACTION be set to RESTART. This forces the system to attempt to write a crash dump to the dump file, and after the dump write completes, the system tries to reboot itself automatically. For example, the following command sets the system to reboot automatically:

    >>> SET AUTO_ACTION RESTART
  8. After you set this variable, HP recommends that you set the boot device and operating system flags as well, using the SET BOOTDEF_DEV and SET BOOT_OSFLAGS commands described in the following sections.

Setting and Showing Boot Devices

Use the SET BOOTDEF_DEV command to tell the system which drive you want to boot from (that drive becomes the default boot device). Use the SHOW BOOTDEF_DEV command to display the current default boot device.

Note that when you set this variable, HP recommends that you set the operating system boot parameters as well, using the SET BOOT_OSFLAGS command.

At the console prompt (>>>), enter the SET BOOTDEF_DEV command in the following format:

SET BOOTDEF_DEV device-name

Substitute the device name of the system disk for device-name. For example, to boot from a drive with a device name of DKA400 on a DEC 3000 Alpha series computer, enter the following command and press Enter:

>>> SET BOOTDEF_DEV DKA400

The next time you boot the system, you can enter the BOOT command without specifying a device name (because DKA400 is now the default boot device). For example:

>>> BOOT

Note:

If you have not used the SET BOOTDEF_DEV command to set the drive to boot from and you enter the BOOT command without specifying a device name, the system displays an error message.

Use the SHOW BOOTDEF_DEV command to find out what drive was specified in the last SET BOOT command. For example:

>>> SHOW BOOTDEF_DEV

To cancel the drive specified in a previous SET BOOTDEF_DEV command, enter the following command and press Enter:

>>> SET BOOTDEF_DEV

Note:

This command is not valid on DEC 3000 Alpha series systems.

Setting Boot Flag Parameters

By default, when you boot the operating system, the flags parameter is set to 0. If you want to define parameters to enable specific functions during the booting process, use the SET BOOT_OSFLAGS console command.

The following is a list of values you can specify with the SET BOOT_OSFLAGS command.

Note:

HP recommends that you keep the BOOT_OSFLAGS parameter at the default value 0 unless you have a specific need to change it (for example, to troubleshoot a system boot problem).

Hexadecimal ValueSystem Response

1

Allows a conversational boot (the system displays the SYSBOOT> prompt).

2

Maps XDELTA to a running system.

4

Stops the boot procedure at the initial system breakpoint.

8

Performs a diagnostic bootstrap.

10

Stops the boot procedure at the bootstrap breakpoints.

20

Omits header from secondary bootstrap image.

80

Prompts for the name of the secondary bootstrap file.

100

Halts the system before the secondary bootstrap.

2000

Marks corrected read data error pages as bad.

10000

Displays extensive, detailed debug messages during the boot process.

20000

Displays selected user-oriented messages during the boot process.

The following examples show how to use the SET BOOT_OSFLAGS command:

  • The following command specifies the root directory as 0 and the parameter as 1, which sets the system to perform a conversational boot from the [SYS0] directory when you enter the BOOT command:

    >>> SET BOOT_OSFLAGS 0,1            
  • The following command specifies the root directory as 1 and the parameter as 0, which sets the system (for example, the second host in a two-system DSSI OpenVMS Cluster configuration) to boot from the [SYS1] directory (instead of [SYS0]) when you enter the BOOT command:

    >>> SET BOOT_OSFLAGS 1,0            
  • The following example specifies the root directory as 0 and the parameters as 1, 2, 4, and 20000 (for a total hexadecimal value of 20007). As a result, when you enter the BOOT command, the system performs a conversational boot from the [SYS0] directory with XDELTA, stops at the initial system breakpoint, and displays relevant user messages.

    >>> SET BOOT_OSFLAGS 0,20007            

To display the parameters you have just set, use the SHOW BOOT_OSFLAGS command. For example:

>>> SHOW BOOT_OSFLAGS            
BOOT_OSFLAGS = 0,20007 

Now that the boot parameters have been set, to boot the system using the parameters you have specified, simply type BOOT or B at the prompt (>>>).

Writing a New Boot Block

The boot block is block 0 of the system disk. It contains the size and location of the primary bootstrap image (APB.EXE) used to boot the system. If you suspect that the boot block on your system disk is invalid, you can use the Writeboot utility (WRITEBOOT.EXE) to write a new boot block.

The Writeboot utility is copied to your system disk during the installation procedure. It enables you to create a bootable OpenVMS Alpha system disk from one that was originally created by one of the following methods:

  • A nonimage backup of an Alpha system disk (possibly corrupting the boot block)

  • A nonimage restore of an Alpha system disk from an image save set

The Writeboot utility also enables you to rewrite the boot block of an OpenVMS Alpha system disk to point to a new version of the OpenVMS Alpha primary bootstrap file (APB.EXE) that you have previously copied to the disk. (Note that the file must be contiguous.)

Note:

The file must be contiguous and movefile operations on the file must be disabled. If the file is not contiguous, use the DCL command COPY/CONTIGUOUS (or similar) to re-create a contiguous version of the file. To disable movefile operations, use the DCL command SET FILE/NOMOVE. This prevents bootstrap failures that could result from the normal and expected operations of disk defragmentation tools.

To start the Writeboot utility, enter the following command:

$ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:WRITEBOOT

The utility prompts you as follows:

Update VAX portion of boot block (default is Y):
Update Alpha portion of boot block (default is Y):

Answer N (NO) to the VAX prompt. If you answer Y (YES) to update the Alpha boot block, the utility prompts you for the Alpha boot file:

Enter Alpha boot file:

Specify device-name:[VMS$COMMON.SYSEXE]APB.EXE in response to this prompt, where device-name indicates the device on which the system disk is mounted. The utility writes the specified information to the boot block on the system disk. For more information, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Halt and Shutdown Operations

The following sections describe halt and shutdown operations for Alpha computers.

Halting the System

During installation, upgrade, and related system operations, you might need to halt your system. The methods for halting Alpha computers differ slightly with certain models, as described in the next section.

The following table summarizes the ways you can halt specific Alpha computers:

Alpha ComputerHow to Halt

AlphaServer 300, 800, 1000, 1200, 2000, 2100 series

Do one of the following:

  • Press Halt.

  • Press Ctrl/P.

AlphaServer 8200, 8400 series

Press Ctrl/P.

AlphaStation 200, 400, 500, 600 series

Do one of the following:

  • Press Halt (if the graphics monitor is serving as the console).

  • Press Ctrl/P (if you are using the alternate console and port).

DEC 2000, 3000 series

Do one of the following:

  • Press Halt (if the graphics monitor is serving as the console).

  • Press Ctrl/P (if you are using the alternate console and port).

DEC 4000 series

Do one of the following:

  • Press the Halt.

  • Press Break on the console (the default setting).

  • Press Ctrl/P, but only after using the console command SET TTA0_HALTSn to enable this key combination, where n can be 6 (enables the Break key and Ctrl/P) or 2 (enables Ctrl/P but disables the Break key).

DEC 7000, 10000 series

Press Ctrl/P.

Shutting Down the System

Before you shut down the operating system, decide if you want it to reboot automatically or if you want to enter console-mode commands after the shutdown completes.

You can perform the following three types of shutdown operations:

  • An orderly shutdown with SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN.COM (see Section  )

  • An emergency shutdown with OPCCRASH.EXE (see Section  )

  • An emergency shutdown with crash commands (see Section  )

If you want the system to reboot automatically after the shutdown, see Section .

Orderly Shutdown

The SHUTDOWN.COM procedure shuts down the system while performing maintenance functions such as disabling future logins, stopping the batch and printer queues, dismounting volumes, and stopping user processes. To use the SHUTDOWN.COM command procedure, log in to the SYSTEM account, enter the following command, and press Enter:

$ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN

For more information about the SHUTDOWN.COM command procedure, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Emergency Shutdown with OPCCRASH.EXE

If you cannot perform an orderly shutdown with the SHUTDOWN.COM procedure, run the OPCCRASH.EXE emergency shutdown program. To run the OPCCRASH.EXE program, log in to the SYSTEM account, enter the following command, and press Enter:

$ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:OPCCRASH

For more information about the OPCCRASH program, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

Emergency Shutdown with Crash Commands

Use crash commands only if the system “hangs” (stops responding to any commands) and you cannot log in to the SYSTEM account to use the SHUTDOWN.COM procedure or the OPCCRASH.EXE program.

Note:

The method described here works on all Alpha computers. However, on certain systems, you can force your processor to fail (crash) by entering a specific console command. See the hardware manuals that came with your computer for that information.

To force your processor to fail, do the following:

  1. Halt the system by pressing either Ctrl/P or Halt. (See Section  for more information about how to halt your Alpha computer.)

  2. To examine processor registers, enter the following commands and press Enter:

    >>> E -N F R0
    >>> E PS

    The system displays the contents of the registers. Write down these values if you want to save information about the state of the system.

  3. Enter the following commands and press Enter:

    >>> D PC FFFFFFFF00000000
    >>> D PS 1F00

    By depositing these values, you cause the system to write a memory dump to the system dump file on the disk.

  4. Enter the following command and press Enter:

    >>> CONTINUE

    This causes the system to perform a bugcheck.

  5. After the system reboots, log in to the SYSTEM account.

  6. To examine the dump file, enter the following commands and press Enter after each one:

    $ ANALYZE/CRASH SYS$SYSTEM:SYSDUMP.DMP
    SDA> SHOW CRASH

    For more information about the System Dump Analyzer (SDA) utility, see the HP OpenVMS System Analysis Tools Manual.

Troubleshooting Procedures

The following sections describe procedures that you can follow if you encounter problems with your system.

If the System Does Not Boot

If the system does not boot because a hardware problem occurs, a question mark(?) usually precedes the error message displayed on the console terminal. An example of a hardware problem is a read error on a disk.

For Hardware Problems

If you suspect a hardware problem, do the following:

  1. Consult the hardware manual for your Alpha computer.

  2. Contact an HP support representative.

For Software Problems

When the operating system is loaded into memory, a message similar to the following is displayed on the terminal screen:

SYSTEM   job terminated at 27-AUG-2004 15:05:03.17

If the system does not display this message, a software problem has probably occurred. Do the following:

  1. Turn off the system. Turn it back on and try to reboot.

  2. Perform a conversational boot using the default system parameters or try one of the emergency boot procedures described in Section .

  3. If the system boots, run the AUTOGEN procedure. For more information about the AUTOGEN procedure, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

Detecting and Responding to System Problems

If your system exhibits unexpected behavior, note the following:

  • If the system displays a bugcheck message on the console terminal and shuts itself down, it means the system encountered a problem that made further operation impossible or dangerous. If the system does not reboot automatically, set up your system to boot automatically as explained in Section , or reboot the system manually as explained in Section .

  • If the system stops responding to your commands (that is, the system “hangs”), there is a possible failure in a system software or hardware component or a possible power failure.

  • If the system exhibits erratic behavior (it does not respond according to specifications), it indicates a possible failure in a system software or hardware component.

To determine whether the failure is a system problem:

  • Be sure that you did not press F1 (the Hold Screen key). The Hold Screen light goes on when you press either F1 or press Ctrl/S.

  • Press Ctrl/T to check the status of your process. A status line should appear, indicating the name of the program that is executing and other information. If the status line does not appear, the program you are executing might be stalled or “hanging.” (If you have disabled Ctrl/T by entering the command SET NOCONTROL=T or have set the terminal to NOBROADCAST mode by entering the command SET TERMINAL/NOBROADCAST, this procedure does not work.)

  • Make sure the cable connecting the terminal or monitor to the system is secure.

If you determine that you have a system problem:

  1. Force an exit from a stalled or hanging program by pressing Ctrl/Y. Note that when you press Ctrl/Y, any work performed by the program and not saved on disk is lost.

  2. If the system is still unresponsive, halt it by pressing either Ctrl/P or Halt. (See Section  for more information about how to halt your Alpha computer.)

  3. Note in detail the sequence of events that caused the problem and notify an HP support representative.

Appendix B Configuring OpenVMS I64 Hardware Operation and Boot Operations, and Booting and Shutting Down Your System

Contents

Configuration and Management Utilities for HP Integrity Servers
Overview of Utilities and Console Options
Configuration and Management Utilities on Cell-Based Servers
Using the Delete or Backspace Key with Integrity Server Utilities
Selecting Your OpenVMS Console for the Integrity Server System
Selecting Your OpenVMS Console (Not Applicable to rx2600 Integrity Servers)
Selecting Your OpenVMS Console on rx2600 Integrity Servers
Overview of Using EFI
General Notes About Using EFI
Enabling or Disabling Hyper-Threading on Dual-Core Processors
Configuring and Managing OpenVMS Booting on Integrity Servers
Checking the ACPI Configuration for Booting OpenVMS in an nPartition
Setting Boot Options for Your System Disk
Writing a New Boot Block
Alpha and Equivalent Integrity Server System Boot Commands
Booting Operations
Overview of Booting on a Cell-Based Server
Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD from the Local Drive
Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD from the InfoServer
Booting an Image of the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD Using HP SIM Provisioning
Booting an Image of the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD Using vMedia
Booting from a Fibre Channel Device
Booting Manually from the Local System Disk
Performing a Conversational (Interactive) Boot
Booting with Minimum Startup
Booting with the XDelta Utility (XDELTA)
Booting from a Different Root Directory
Emergency Booting
Halt and Shutdown Procedures
Halting the Integrity Server to Recover from Hangs and Crashes
Shutting Down the System
Troubleshooting Procedures
If the System Does Not Boot
Detecting and Responding to System Problems

This appendix briefly describes the configuration and management tools that might be available on HP Integrity servers, and explains how to set up the system console, configure boot options, boot the OpenVMS I64 operating system, and shut down the operating system. The appendix also includes brief troubleshooting procedures.

Specifically, this appendix contains the following information:

  • Hardware/firmware configuration and management interfaces and their features

  • Setting up your system console

  • Overview of using the Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI)

  • Enabling or disabling Hyper-Threading on nPartitions that have dual-core processors that support it

  • Configuring and managing boot operations such as the following:

    • Setting the system for automatic booting

    • Setting and showing boot devices

    • Setting boot parameters

    • Writing a new boot block

  • Booting operations, including the following:

    • Booting the OE DVD

    • Booting the system disk

    • Performing a conversational (interactive) boot

    • Booting with minimum startup

    • Booting with the XDelta utility (XDELTA)

    • Booting from a different root directory

    • Booting in an emergency

  • Halting and shutting down operations

  • Troubleshooting procedures

Note:

Any information about Integrity server hardware and utilities is provided in this manual for your convenience and is not intended to replace the hardware documentation included with your Integrity server system or the latest documentation available on the Web. HP Integrity servers are available in many different configurations. Hardware, utilities, and certain hardware configuration procedures might differ significantly across models, and even across versions of the same model. Please see your hardware documentation for the most up-to-date information specific to your particular model and version. Note that the hardware documentation includes model-specific illustrations to guide you. The latest version of documentation for your server can be found online at:

http://docs.hp.com/en/hw.html

http://docs.hp.com

http://www.hp.com/support/itaniumservers

Configuration and Management Utilities for HP Integrity Servers

This section provides a brief overview of the configuration and management utilities that are typically available for your Integrity server system. For more information, see the appropriate hardware documentation.

Overview of Utilities and Console Options

The main interfaces that are typically available for configuring and managing your HP Integrity server environment are the Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) and the Management Processor (MP). On entry-class Integrity servers, MP has been replaced by the Integrated Lights Out (iLO) Management Processor, which includes all the functionality of MP plus additional features. On some models, the Baseboard Management Control (BMC) utility is provided. Cell-based servers include additional management tools.

EFI is the main boot and preboot interface; it is the core interface to the system firmware and console commands on all models. BMC is provided on entry-class HP Integrity servers (although on a few systems the interface itself is hidden). BMC provides basic management capabilities and access to EFI. MP (or iLO) is available on most systems; on some systems it is available only if the necessary console hardware has been installed and configured. In addition to providing access to EFI, MP provides advanced management functionality (beyond that which is available through BMC), including remote management, network console and Web-based access, and enhanced diagnostic capabilities. Both BMC and MP (iLO) can operate on standby power—even when the Integrity server’s main power switch is turned to the off position.

EFI is the base console environment. You can either use MP (iLO) or BMC to interact with the capabilities of the console interface.

The OpenVMS I64 installation and upgrade procedures assist you in adding a boot option for your newly installed or upgraded system disk. Before you can boot your OpenVMS system, your console must be configured correctly, as explained in Section .

The following briefly describes some of the main features of EFI, MP, and BMC.

  • Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI)

    EFI is a menu and command-line interface between the operating system and the system firmware. The EFI interface is available only when the operating system is not booted; on cell-based servers, the interface is available from an nPartition console when the nPartition is in an active state but has not booted an operating system. To configure EFI boot options while the operating system is running, OpenVMS provides the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM). Changes made by this utility do not take effect until the system is rebooted.

    The EFI Boot Manager, like the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager, provides support for operating system loaders and enables you to configure the firmware and control the booting environment for your OpenVMS operating system. A FAT partition on the boot disk stores the system loader. The Boot Configuration menu (or in some versions of EFI, the Boot Option Maintenance Menu) enables you to add or delete a boot option, change the boot order, select the active console, and more. After you power up the server, the EFI boot manager presents different ways to bring up the system, depending on how you have set up the boot options. For example, you can boot to the EFI Shell. When you select the EFI Shell command-line interface option, you can enter commands at the EFI Shell prompt. For more information about EFI options and commands, see Section  and the appropriate hardware documentation.

    Note:

    In some HP documents, you might see the acronym POSSE used in place of or in combination with EFI. EFI is an Intel specification of an interface between firmware and the operating system. POSSE (Pre-OS System Environment) is the HP implementation of EFI that extends the EFI Shell and EFI Boot Manager to include additional features for managing hardware and system boot options.

  • Management Processor (MP)

    Management Processor (or, on entry-class Integrity servers, iLO) provides both local and remote access for controlling the system console, reset/power management, and transfer of control (TOC) capabilities. It also enables you to monitor tasks and display detailed information about various internal subsystems. On cell-based servers, MP is a complex-wide tool and is always available, even if nPartitions are not configured or booted in the server complex. In contrast, EFI does not operate as a complex-wide tool and is only available when the nPartition is in an active state but has not booted an operating system; each nPartition has its own EFI interface. Using MP, you can select the partition for which you want EFI access. You can access all hardware and nPartitions in the complex. The following is a brief summary of MP’s main features:

    • Console connectivity

      As a console interface, MP enables you to interact with EFI and to power the server on or off; ultimately, it can function as the OPA0: terminal port on OpenVMS.

    • Virtual Front Panel (VFP)

      MP provides a virtual front panel that you can use to monitor the front panel LEDs from a remote location.

    • Command interface

      MP provides an extensive menu system and a command-line interface.

    • Multiple, simultaneous viewers

      Multiple users can access the MP console or a particular nPartition console. Only one user at a time is allowed interactive access. All other users have read-only access. (Output from the interactive user is reflected to the read-only users currently accessing the console.) Access to MP can be restricted by password-protected user accounts.

    • Availability/standby power

      MP is available whenever the system is connected to a power source, even if the server’s main power switch is in the off position.

    • Accessibility

      MP is accessible in several ways, including by direct monitor connection using a terminal, PC, laptop or desktop computer connected to the MP serial port (with certain Integrity servers, you can also use a VGA monitor and USB keyboard and mouse); by modem through an EIA-232 port; or by Telnet or Web browser on the LAN. MP is accessible through Secure Shell (SSH), which is provided by TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS. This method of access is more secure than any of the other methods.

    • Console log

      MP records recent output from the system console. The cl command enables you to view the recorded information.

    • Event logs

      MP includes event logs that include information about system events and booting. The sl command displays the contents of system status logs.

    On some systems, such as the rx1600, MP is optional. For more information about MP options and commands, see the appropriate hardware documentation.

    Note:

    MP provides much more functionality than BMC and might be more appropriate for your needs. On some systems, MP is an optional component and on others it is built into the system.

  • Baseboard Management Controller (BMC)

    BMC is more limited in functionality than MP. BMC enables you to control some management features built into the system board, such as diagnostics, configuration, and hardware management. BMC provides a console connection on some systems. As with MP, BMC enables you to interact with EFI; it can function as the OPA0: terminal port on OpenVMS. BMC also operates on standby power. However, BMC is accessible only through the serial port on the back of the system. BMC commands enable you to control the BMC interface, view logs, get help, display firmware revisions, reset the system, turn the system locator LED on or off, and change the BMC password.BMC is not provided on cell-based Integrity servers. On some systems, such as the rx4640, the BMC user interface is hidden but is still present and functional. For more information about BMC commands, see the appropriate hardware documentation.

Configuration and Management Utilities on Cell-Based Servers

For the more complex environments provided by cell-based Integrity servers, a wider variety of tools is provided. Systems with multiple nPartitions provide a separate EFI interface for each nPartition. MP provides access to, and allows management across, the complex and each nPartition EFI interface.

In addition to MP and EFI (cell-based servers do not provide BMC), these systems offer Partition Manager and other tools that vary from system to system and operating system to operating system. The Partition Manager (parmgr) utility provides a graphical interface for managing nPartitions and complex hardware. It centralizes all nPartition management functions in one place, providing the system manager with the tools to dynamically reconfigure, power on, power off, create, delete, and modify nPartitions to ensure smooth and well-controlled operation. Partition Manager can be run on HP-UX or Microsoft Windows systems. You can use either version of Partition Manager to manage nPartitions for OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1. Partition Manager is a free product that you can download from the following website (PARMGR must be uppercase as shown):

http://www.docs.hp.com/en/PARMGR2/download.html

For more information about Partition Manager, see the nPartition Administrator's Guide (previously titled HP System Partitions Guide: Administration for nPartitions).

For more information about these and other tools available for configuring or managing Integrity servers, see the appropriate hardware documentation.

Using the Delete or Backspace Key with Integrity Server Utilities

Some versions of the EFI environment and the MP and BMC console interfaces on Integrity server systems still interpret the Delete (or Backspace) key as do UNIX systems, which is different from the way OpenVMS Alpha systems or Microsoft Windows systems interpret it. Whereas the OpenVMS operating system uses the ASCII DEL/RUBOUT character (7F hexadecimal) to delete the last character typed in a command line, these Integrity server facilities use Ctrl/H. When you enter commands for these Integrity servers, if you press Delete at a VTxxx terminal (or press the key you have mapped to send the DEL/RUBOUT character code in your terminal emulator), the last character typed is not deleted.

You can remap a terminal so that the Delete key removes the last character typed by adding the following command to your login command procedure (generally, LOGIN.COM):

$ SET TERMINAL/BACKSPACE=DELETE

This command remaps Ctrl/H to DEL. The driver does not remap these keys if the terminal is in one of the following states:

  • Terminal attribute is set to PASSALL

  • Terminal attribute is set to PASTHRU

  • IO$_READALL

  • IO$_READPBLK

  • Ctrl/V is entered, which tells the driver to pass the next character and skip the remap check.

Alternatively, you can set up your terminal emulator so that the Backspace key deletes the last character typed. However, for the key to work properly on OpenVMS, you must still enter the SET TERMINAL command described earlier.

Selecting Your OpenVMS Console for the Integrity Server System

You must set up the firmware console as described in the hardware or firmware documentation provided with your Integrity server. When first powered on, Integrity servers interact with the firmware interface and accept input from one or more console devices. These devices include the Integrity iLO MP (or simply MP on some servers; for simplicity, this section refers to MP for both firmware interfaces), serial ports, and if present, local graphics monitor and keyboard. The default console devices enabled for use by the firmware depend on the Integrity server hardware model and associated firmware (see your hardware documentation). The MP port is typically used by the OpenVMS operating system on an Integrity server (recommended by HP). This port provides serial access as well as networked access to the firmware console. If using the serial port, use a VT100–capable terminal or emulator device. On Integrity servers that do not have an MP port, the console serial port (generally on the back of the server) is enabled.

With the exception of some older Integrity server models, such as the HP Integrity rx2600 server, the current firmware available for Integrity servers provides a text menu-based interface by default. The current firmware also includes the concept of console interfaces that are “Primary,”“Secondary,”and “Not Configured.” The Primary console is the console enabled for interacting with the operating system as well as with the firmware. Although the firmware can interact with multiple console devices, OpenVMS uses only one of these devices as its console and requires that one device be selected. You select one device to serve as the Primary console, as explained in Section  where more details are also given about the Primary, Secondary, and Not Configured console selections.

When an Integrity server is powered up, the firmware displays information to the Primary and Secondary console devices. If you do not see output within a few seconds of powering up, your console device is probably not selected as a Primary or Secondary device; you will need to connect your console terminal cable to the appropriate device. When connected to the correct device, the firmware displays the EFI Boot Manager screen, from where you can begin to navigate to select the Primary console for use by OpenVMS, as explained later in this section. When using the firmware to boot OpenVMS, if you do not see OpenVMS console output and the system appears hung, your console terminal device might be connected to a Secondary console device instead of the Primary console device.

If you are already using the system console, you can disregard the remainder of this section. If you have ordered a machine with OpenVMS preinstalled, your console selections have been chosen for you, but you might want to change these default console selections. If you have changed your system configuration, or if you are installing OpenVMS on a new (uninstalled) Integrity server, or if you are reinstalling OpenVMS using the INITIALIZE option (removing all the software and data files that were previously installed on the target system disk), you might need to select the correct console. If the correct console is not selected, OpenVMS might use an unexpected device as the console, causing your system to appear to be hanging; or OpenVMS either will fail to boot or will boot with output sent to the wrong location.

You can use MP to establish remote console access, such as through the TELNET utility provided with HP TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS. Alternatively, you can access the MP console interface through the Internet using an Internet browser.If you intend to set up LAN or remote access for an MP console interface, you must initially use the serial port for console operations when you set up the Integrity server for the first time. (See your hardware documentation for instructions on setting LAN or remote access for the MP console interface.)

Your first step is to decide what console to use. Depending on your hardware/firmware configuration, OpenVMS can use one of the following types of consoles:

  • System serial port

  • MP (or iLO MP) serial port

    The MP interface is not visible to OpenVMS unless the MP serial port is selected as the Primary console.

  • Graphics (VGA) device

    Graphics console support is introduced with OpenVMS Version 8.3–1H1. This allows you to use a monitor and a USB keyboard and mouse connected directly to the Integrity server ports available for such purposes. Certain older (legacy) Integrity servers, such as the rx2600, do not support a graphics console because they lack the required firmware capabilities. On some Integrity servers, a VGA device might not be built into the system, in which case a graphics option card is required for VGA console support.

    Most Integrity servers support multiple graphics options; the exceptions are the rx1600 and rx1620 servers. A graphics option consists of a graphics card and a graphics display interface (monitor). When multiple graphics devices are present, you can select only one device for use by the firmware as a console device. The other graphics devices must be set to Not Configured (NC). When DECwindows is used on a system booted using the VGA as the OpenVMS console, DECwindows selects the VGA console as the default screen. When enabling multihead DECwindows graphics operation, the VGA console defaults to screen 0. If no VGA device is configured as a console, DECwindows selects a default screen based on the Integrity server model and device bus ordering. For details about enabling multihead DECwindows graphics operation, see Section .

    Note the following restrictions:

    • OpenVMS supports up to four add-on graphics devices plus any built-in graphics, depending on the Integrity server and available slots. The firmware available on some Integrity servers might limit which devices can be used as a VGA console device. For information about your specific configuration's platform and graphics configuration rules, see your hardware documentation .

    • For correct operation of the VGA console, OpenVMS requires that at least one other non-VGA device be configured as the Secondary console.

    • XDELTA is not available when using the VGA console; it is disabled when requested.

    • Conversational (interactive) boot (SYSBOOT>) is not supported with the VGA console. To change SYSGEN parameters, use SYSGEN from OpenVMS, or boot OpenVMS from a non-VGA console for conversational boot.

    • When using a VGA console and installing from vMedia or a USB DVD drive with the keyboard plugged into a USB hub, the keyboard might not be operational initially. To enable keyboard operation, simply unplug the hub and plug it back in.

For more information, platform-specific details, and the firmware required for VGA support, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes and the hardware documentation for your Integrity server.

The procedure for selecting the correct console varies according to the Integrity server model and firmware. For Integrity servers other than the rx2600, follow the steps in Section . For rx2600 Integrity servers and servers for which you cannot obtain the required firmware, follow the steps in Section .

Note:

Make sure your Integrity server has the latest firmware updates installed.

Selecting Your OpenVMS Console (Not Applicable to rx2600 Integrity Servers)

On Integrity servers other than the rx2600 (or on servers with outdated firmware), console devices can be configured as one of the following three types:

  • Primary console—The device enabled as a console for the firmware interface and used as the OpenVMS console (OPA0). If a VGA device (device path) is selected as the Primary console, at least one serial device path must be set as a Secondary console in order to use the VGA device to boot OpenVMS.

  • Secondary console—A device enabled as a console for the firmware but not used as the OpenVMS console during or after booting. The device is configured as a normal serial port device. Note that if you specify an MP port as the Secondary console, it will not be visible to OpenVMS. The MP port is visible to OpenVMS only when selected as a Primary console. If multiple serial ports are available as a console on your Integrity server and you select one for a Secondary console, do not use that console for transmission of binary data.

  • Not Configured—A device that is not enabled as a console for the firmware or operating system.

Your system can be booted from any Primary or Secondary console but OpenVMS output displays only on the primary console. For information about serial devices that can be selected as the console and the serial device port enumeration, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3-1H1 for Integrity Servers New Features and Release Notes.

You can select a console in one of two ways:

  • Using the EFI Boot Manager, as described in Section 

  • Using the EFI shell, as described in Section 

The examples in the following two subsections show how to select a VGA device for the OpenVMS console.

Using the EFI Boot Manager to Select the OpenVMS Console

To select the device for your OpenVMS console using the EFI Boot Manager, follow these steps. Depending on the firmware version and configuration, menu selections displayed on your screen might differ from those seen in the examples . Note that with this EFI firmware, you no longer have to select a console input device, console output device, and console error device. The firmware automatically sets the Primary console device to be the console input, console output, and console error device.

  1. From the EFI Boot Manager screen, use the up or down arrow key to select the Boot Configuration menu and press Enter:

    Boot Manager: Selecting the Boot Configuration menu
  2. From the Boot Configuration menu, select the Console Configuration menu and press Enter:

    Boot Manager: Selecting the Console Configuration menu
  3. If the Console Configuration menu shows that your preferred device is already configured as the Primary console, you need not continue; otherwise, select the device that you want as the OpenVMS Primary console. In the following screen, the VGA device is selected:

    Boot Manager: Selecting the VGA device for a graphics
console
  4. Enter P to configure the selected device as the Primary console. You then see the selected device as the Primary console:

    Boot Manager: Configuring the selected device
as the Primary console
  5. Press the Esc key to return to the previous menu. When prompted whether to save changes to NVRAM, enter Y:

    Boot Manager: Saving the changed console configuration
in NVRAM
  6. When prompted whether to reset the system, enter Y to make the changes take effect:

    Boot Manager: Resetting the system to make changes take
effect

Using the EFI Shell to Select the OpenVMS Console

To select the device for your OpenVMS console using the EFI shell, follow these steps:

  1. At the EFI Shell prompt, enter the conconfig command to view the index number for the available console devices, as in the following example (the column titled “Primary” displays how the device is configured (P for Primary, S for Secondary, NC for Not Configured):

    Shell>conconfig
    CONSOLE CONFIGURATION
    
      Index Primary Type      Device Path
      ----- ------- -----     ----------
        1      P    Serial    Acpi (PNP0501,0)
        2      S    Serial    Acpi (HWP0002,700)/Pci (1|1)
        3      S    VGA       Acpi (HWP0002,700)/Pci (2|0) 
  2. If your preferred device is already configured as the Primary console, you need not continue. If your preferred device is not currently configured as the Primary console, enter the conconfig command in the following format:

    conconfig index primary

    where index is the index number of the device preferred for the OpenVMS console. In the following example, the VGA device is selected as the Primary console, and the resulting display reflects the configuration change:

    Shell>conconfig 3 primary
    CONSOLE CONFIGURATION
    
      Index Primary Type      Device Path
      ----- ------- -----     ----------
        1      S    Serial    Acpi (PNP0501,0)
        2      S    Serial    Acpi (HWP0002,700)/Pci (1|1)
        3      P    VGA       Acpi (HWP0002,700)/Pci (2|0) 
  3. Enter the reset command to make the changes active, as in the following example:

    Shell>reset

Selecting Your OpenVMS Console on rx2600 Integrity Servers

This section describes how to select a console on rx2600 Integrity servers or other servers with outdated firmware. On such servers, you must configure a Console Input, Console Output, and Console Error Device for your OpenVMS console. There is no concept of the Primary console that automatically configures these devices for the OpenVMS console. In addition, on such servers OpenVMS does not support graphics consoles.

Note:

The following instructions assume that OpenVMS is not installed on your Integrity server and that boot options are not defined.

  1. Decide what console you want to use.

  2. Power on the system. If using an MP serial port, log in to MP and access EFI. If you are setting the system serial port as your system console, go to the next step now. If you are setting the MP serial port as your system consoleand you have just powered on your Integrity server, the MP console interface prompts you to log in. (By default, both user name and password are set to Admin. For security purposes, change the password immediately. See your hardware documentation for more information.)

    Note:

    To see the MP login user name and password prompts, you might need to press Enter one or more times on your console keyboard. If this does not work, try pressing Ctrl/B.

    If you see only the MP password prompt, press Enter to get to the MP login prompt.

    If the login prompt still fails to appear, the system might be powered off. (When you powered on the system, you might have pressed the power button twice, which turns it on and then off.)

    If you see a message similar to the following, another user has the console (only one user can write to the console, although multiple users can view it).

    [Read only - use Ctrl-Ecf for console write access]

    To gain control of the console from the other user, press Ctrl/E, release the key combination, and then immediately type the letters cf. Alternatively, you can have the other user log off.

    Note that the system does not work if it is running MP firmware older than version E02.22. For information about updating the MP firmware, see Section .

    When the MP> prompt is displayed, move to the EFI interface by entering the co (console mode) command. If the power or initialization sequence has not completed, you will see that and must wait until the menu reappears, at which point reenter the co command to get to the EFI Boot Manager menu. At the EFI Boot Manager menu, select the EFI Shell interface.

    On Integrity servers without nPartitions, the co command brings you directly to the EFI Boot Manager screen. If you do not enter a command before the EFI countdown timer expires, the EFI Shell prompt is displayed. (On some servers, the countdown timer is 10 seconds by default; on others, such as Server Blades, it might be even less.) Note that when the operating system is running, the co command brings you to the console port of the operating system.

    On cell-based servers, unless you are using a single-partition user account, the co command first brings you to a console menu that lists the available nPartitions. Select the appropriate nPartition to access the EFI Boot Manager console for that nPartition. The following example shows a console menu (menus and displays such as this might vary from system to system):

    Partitions available:
    
        #   Name
       ---   ----
        1)   MIA1
        2)   MIA2
        3)   TESTING
        4)   LAN
        5)   AMYS
        6)   ACCNTS
        Q)   Quit
    
       Please select partition number:

    If the co command results in a screen that is unexpected or difficult to interpret, pressing Enter might help. If you are at an EFI submenu instead of the main menu, navigate to the main menu by exiting from the submenu and any subsequent submenus until you return to the EFI main menu.

    For more information about determining which nPartition to access, see the nPartition Administrator's Guide (previously titled HP System Partitions Guide: Administration for nPartitions) or the appropriate hardware documentation.

  3. Access the EFI Boot Configuration menu. The EFI Boot Manager screen includes a boot menu. The default menu option is highlighted, as shown in the following example:

    Note:

    The appearance of EFI Boot Manager screens and menus differs from version to version of the firmware.

    EFI Boot Menu

    From the EFI boot menu, select the Boot Configuration option (or, in some versions of EFI, the Boot Option Maintenance Menu). To move to an option, use the up or down arrow key. (With some terminal emulators, you might have to use the letter v to scroll down or the caret (^) to scroll up.) Press Enter to toggle the selection. If you do not select an option within the countdown period, EFI moves to the default option—the EFI Shell in the boot menu example, in which case the EFI Shell prompt is displayed. Exit the EFI Shell to return to the Boot Configuration menu. If lines from the preceding screen linger and obscure the EFI Shell prompt, press Enter to bring the EFI Shell prompt into view.

  4. Configure the Console Input, Console Output, and Console Error Devices. If you have the latest EFI firmware, select the Console Configuration option from the Boot Configuration menu to list the console input, console output, and console error device options. Some versions of EFI list the three console device options directly in the Boot Option Maintenance Menu. Configure each console option one at a time, as follows:

    Note:

    With OpenVMS systems, the input, output, and error console all must point to the same serial-line console device. New systems might be shipped with multiple devices selected for each of the console types, so make sure only one device is selected for each. If you see an error message that mentions multiple device-path instances for the console input or output device, perform the following steps to select a single console only.

    On rx2600 Integrity servers and certain other servers with firmware that is not up to date, OpenVMS might not boot using a USB keyboard or a VGA graphics display device. The system might boot with these devices but does not display any indication that the system is booting. You might receive a warning when the system begins to boot. You might also see other errors in later stages of the boot. Additionally, you might lose output that you normally see during booting.

    1. Select the console input device. EFI displays a list of devices (device paths) available for console input. Select only one device from this list, and deselect any unused devices. The following is a sample list of devices, annotated with explanatory text below the list. This example shows the devices for an entry-class Integrity server; the procedure and display differ on cell-based servers. For more information about the EFI paths used for console selection, see the Intel Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) documents available from the Intel website.

      EFI Display of Console Devices for Entry-Class Integrity
server

      System Serial Port

      These four lines indicate any of the valid devices that you can define for the console using the system serial port. Any line that has the notation Uart but not the notation Pci is one of the system serial ports. Notice that the lines are almost identical except for the text following the VenMsg portion indicating the terminal emulation protocol such as VT100. Thus, each of the four entries is the same device with different emulation protocols.

      MP Console

      These four lines appear only on systems that have an MP port. Any lines that include both Uart and Pci are MP serial port devices. As with the serial port devices, these four lines refer to the same device with different emulation protocols.

      VGA Device

      This is the graphic console device. Do not select this. OpenVMS does not support VGA graphics as a console output device for booting on rx2600 Integrity servers.

      Select a device using the protocol appropriate for your terminal emulator (in most cases, VT100+ is the best choice). Select only one device line. OpenVMS does not operate if more than one device is selected.

    2. Save your settings to NVRAM.

    3. Select the console output device. Repeat steps a and b to configure the console output device. Select the same device you selected for the console input device.

    4. Select the console error device. Repeat steps a and b to configure the console error device (also referred to as the standard error device). Select the same device you selected for the console input and output devices.

  5. Perform a cold reset if required. Your system might require a cold reset. Newer versions of EFI do not require a cold reset. For more information, see your hardware documentation.

At this point, you can boot the OpenVMS I64 DVD to install the operating system onto a system disk. Follow the instructions in Chapter 3 (specifics for booting are provided in this appendix).

Note:

Any time new potential console devices are added to a system, or anytime NVRAM on a system is cleared, review your console selections. When you change serial devices, you must also make changes to the input, output, and error console device options to ensure proper operation.

Overview of Using EFI

EFI is the basic interface between the operating system and firmware on all Integrity server systems; it is similar to SRM on Alpha systems. EFI provides a boot option menu and the ability to configure boot options. EFI is accessible when the operating system is not booted. On cell-based servers, EFI is available when the nPartition is in an active state but has not booted an operating system. Each nPartition has its own EFI interface and system boot environment that enables you to interact with the nPartition before an operating system has booted on it.

When you first power on a new Integrity server system, you see a series of diagnostic messages followed by the EFI Boot Manager screen (unless MP is available, in which case you see the MP login screen). However, if your Integrity server came with the OpenVMS I64 operating system installed, then the OpenVMS I64 operating system is the first option and it boots automatically.

Note:

On some systems that include MP, you might first see the MP login screen. In addition, on cell-based servers, you initially must select the console for the nPartition you want to access. As noted previously, the behavior of Integrity server systems can vary significantly from model to model as well as from version to version of the firmware.

To select an option from the EFI Boot Manager menu, use the up or down arrow key to highlight an item (or for some (with some terminal emulators, you might have to use the letter v to scroll down and the caret (^) to scroll up), and then press Enter to activate the selection. You can use EFI to configure numerous options for your Integrity server and OpenVMS operating system.

For the first boot of a system on which OpenVMS is not preinstalled, you probably need to use EFI to get started. When you select the EFI Shell, the console displays much activity before the EFI Shell prompt is displayed. If you do not see the EFI Shell prompt, press Enter. (Note also that the EFI Shell prompt might change, as explained in Section .)

The EFI boot menu lists boot options. Each item in the boot options list references a specific boot device and provides a specific set of boot options or arguments to be used when booting the device. You can add boot options to the boot menu. The OpenVMS installation procedure (as well as the upgrade procedure) can assist you in adding and validating a boot option for your newly installed system disk. The procedure uses the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM) to add and validate boot options. You can use this utility directly at the OpenVMS DCL prompt. HP recommends using either of these methods for configuring boot options rather than using EFI. The OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility is easier to use than EFI and enables you to configure the most pertinent options for your system (while OpenVMS is running), including the following:

  • Display boot options known to the EFI Boot Manager.

  • Add a boot option to the EFI Boot Manager so that your system disk boots automatically when the system is powered on or rebooted.

  • Remove or change the position of a boot option in the EFI Boot Manager list.

  • Validate and fix the boot option list.

  • Change how long EFI pauses before booting or rebooting.

Use of this utility is optional for most devices but is required for configuring boot options on Fibre Channel devices. HP recommends using this utility to add members of a multiple-member shadow set to the boot list and dump device list. (Be sure to add all members to both lists.) For instructions on how to use the utility, see Section . For more information about configuring Fibre Channel devices with this utility, see Appendix E. For information about using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility to display boot options, see Section . For information about setting the pause length, see Section . The OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility also enables you to configure dump off the system disk (DOSD) devices and debug devices; for more information about this, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

General Notes About Using EFI

Note the following:

  • Using EFI on cell-based servers: On an Integrity server with nPartition support, a separate EFI interface exists for each nPartition. Be sure to access the appropriate nPartition console.

    To determine which nPartition EFI interface you are using, use the info sys command at the EFI Shell prompt. This lists the local nPartition number and details about active cells. For processor details, use the info cpu command. (You can also use MP to provide information about the nPartition you are using, as described in the nPartition Administrator's Guide (previously titled HP System Partitions Guide: Administration for nPartitions).)

    You can use the MP console interface to access any nPartition’s EFI console. Press Ctrl/B to move from EFI (or from your OpenVMS session) to the MP interface. Log in to MP if you are prompted. A menu then displays the names of all available nPartitions. Select from this list the nPartition that you want to access. To gain console write access for an nPartition console, press Ctrl/E and enter the letters cf. You can use the MP pdcommand to set a default nPartition for MP login; this helps to ensure you are brought to the intended nPartition (for example, to help prevent you from accidentally reconfiguring an nPartition you do not own).

    To return to the EFI console (when OpenVMS is not booted), enter the co command at the MP> prompt.

  • Navigating EFI file system directories: To switch to a different file system, enter the file system name. The following example shows how to switch to fs3: from the current location (top level of the EFI Shell):

    Shell> fs3:
    fs3:\>

    Note that the prompt is now fs3:\. The EFI Shell prompt changes to reflect the file system currently accessed. The Shell prompt is displayed again if you reset the system. Also note that the file system number might change when remapped after hardware changes are made to the server (for example, after an I/O drive is added to the server and the nPartition boots or the map -r command is issued).

  • File structure of EFI file systems: The file structure of an fs disk is identical to MS-DOS and the commands to move around the structure are similar to MS-DOS commands. For example, to move to directory efi on disk fs0:, enter the cdcommand:

    fs0:\> cd efi
    fs0:\efi>

    To display the contents of the efi directory, use the dircommand.

  • EFI commands for OpenVMS: Most commands that you issue for OpenVMS purposes at the EFI Shell prompt are issued from \efi\vms on the file system associated with the system disk. You can enter such commands directly from the top level by specifying \efi\vms in the path for subsequent commands, or by first moving to \efi\vms and entering the commands without the path specification. The first example that follows shows how to enter commands from the top level. The second example shows how to move to \efi\vms before entering the commands. The vms_show command displays the equivalent OpenVMS device name for devices mapped by EFI, and the vms_set command can be used to set a debug or dump device. These EFI commands for OpenVMS, known as EFI Utilities for OpenVMS, are usable only when the operating system is not running. To display and set EFI-mapped devices while the operating system is running, use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM), as described in Section . The EFI Utilities for OpenVMS are described in the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual.

    Example 1 — From Top Level

    fs0:\> \efi\vms\vms_show device
    .
    .
    .
    fs0:\> \efi\vms\vms_set dump_dev dga3730

    Example 2 — First Moving to \efi\vms

    fs0:\> cd \efi\vms
    fs0:\efi\vms> vms_show device
    .
    .
    .
    fs0:\efi\vms> vms_set dump_dev dga3730

    Note:

    The directory structure and contents of the OpenVMS system disk differs from those of the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD. Note also that the bootstrap on the system disk is located at \efi\vms\vms_loader.efi, while on the DVD it is at \efi\boot\bootia64.efi. (These two files are identical in content.)

  • EFI aliases: You can define aliases for EFI commands that are easier to remember. For example, to define the alias dir for the ls command, use the alias command as follows:

    fs0:\> alias dir "ls"

    To define an alias for the command that boots OpenVMS from fs0:, enter the following command:

    fs0:\> alias bvms "fs0:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi"

    Note:

    Setting an alias to point to a specific device can lead to unexpected results. For example, if you insert a DVD in the DVD/CD drive, fs0: now points to the DVD/CD drive. HP recommends using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility to set your system disk as a boot device for EFI, as explained in Section .

    To list the aliases currently defined, enter the alias command:

    fs0:\> alias
          dir   : ls
          bvms  : fs0:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi
  • Boot device list: Any changes in storage configuration after the system is booted to EFI (such as inserting a DVD into a DVD removable drive or adding SCSI drives on storage enclosures) is not automatically detected by the EFI Shell environment. To have the EFI Shell recognize the device, you must reconnect the device driver (on cell-based servers, use the EFI search command; on other servers, use the EFI reconnect command).

    The EFI shell environment creates default mappings for all the device handles that support a recognized file system. After you change the system configuration or add a new device, you must regenerate these mappings. For information about reconnecting devices and regenerating mappings, see Section  and your hardware documentation or the website listed at the end of this section.

  • Moving between EFI and MP: To move from MP interface to EFI, type co(for Console) at the MP> prompt. If you are in command mode (at the MP:CM> prompt), first press Ctrl/B to return to the MP> prompt.

    When you move to EFI from MP, confirm that you are at the main EFI main menu. If you are at a submenu, to access the main menu exit from the submenu and any subsequent submenus until you return to the main menu.

    To move from the EFI to MP, press Ctrl/B (this assumes MP is present and configured).

For more information about using EFI, see the documentation provided for your Integrity server. Extensive information can also be found online at:

http://developer.intel.com/technology/efi/help/efidocs.htm

Enabling or Disabling Hyper-Threading on Dual-Core Processors

Systems that have Intel Itanium Dual-Core processors can support Hyper-Threading. Hyper-Threading provides the ability for processors to create an additional logical CPU that might allow additional efficiencies of processing. For example, a dual-core processor with Hyper-Threading active provides four logical CPUs, two on each core. The effect that Hyper-Threading has on performance depends heavily on the applications running on your system. HP recommends that you start with Hyper-Threading disabled and experiment later, if you wish.

You can enable or disable Hyper-Threading for a system whose processors support it. To display the Hyper-Threading state for a system, use the EFI info cpu or cpuconfig command. (The display indicates that “CPU threads” are turned on or off.) For example:

Shell> cpuconfig
PROCESSOR MODULE INFORMATION

        # of               L3      L4      Family/
CPU     Logical            Cache   Cache     Model          Processor
Module     CPUs   Speed    Size    Size     (hex.)    Rev   State
-----   -------   ------   ------  ------  ---------  ---   -----
 0           4    1.4 GHz   6 MB   None    20/00      CO    Active

CPU threads are turned on.

To enable or disable Hyper-Threading, use the EFI cpuconfig threads on or cpuconfig threads off command. For more information, enter help cpuconfig at the EFI Shell prompt or see the appropriate hardware documentation. The recent release of the Partition Manager also supports Hyper-Threading.

After enabling or disabling Hyper-Threading, the system must be reset for the change to take effect. Use the EFI Shell reset command. When Hyper-Threading is enabled, it remains active on the next reboot of the system.

Configuring and Managing OpenVMS Booting on Integrity Servers

This section explains how to configure and manage the booting behavior of your Integrity server. You can use the EFI Boot Manager (while the operating system is not running) or the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager (while the operating system is running) to configure boot options. HP recommends using the latter.

You can configure multiple boot entries for a single operating system. On a cell-based Integrity server running multiple operating systems, you can configure boot options for all currently installed operating systems. On cell-based servers, each nPartition has a local instance of EFI that is specific to that partition. Each partition can be booted and stopped independently of other nPartitions in the system, and each partition executes its own operating system image.

On cell-based servers, to successfully boot an operating system you must first ensure that the ACPI configuration is correct for the operating system being booted, as explained in Section . Each nPartition has its own ACPI configuration value.

Important:

To configure booting on a Fibre Channel storage device, you must use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility. (For information about configuring Fibre Channel devices, see Appendix E.) HP also recommends using this utility to add members of a multiple-member shadow set to the boot device list and dump device list. Be sure to add all members to both lists.

If you have just completed the initial setup of your Integrity server, perform the following steps before continuing:

  1. Power up your server system, as explained in the hardware documentation for your server. If you use the power button on the front panel, press it only once.

    Note:

    If you see a warning that the BMC system event log (SEL) is full, you can safely continue by following the prompts; OpenVMS processes the contents of the SEL. If you want to clear the SEL manually, see the instructions in the first note of Section .

    HP recommends that you load and use the most current system firmware. For more information about updating the system firmware, see Section .

  2. If you have a cell-based server, check that the ACPI configuration is correct for the OpenVMS operating system. For more information, see Section .

  3. At the EFI Boot Manager menu, select the EFI Shell [Built-in] option. You can now boot your OpenVMS I64 system manually, or you can add a new entry to the EFI Boot Manager menu to have your system booted automatically whenever you power on your Integrity server or reboot.

This section discusses the following topics:

  • Checking the ACPI configuration for nPartition booting (Section )

  • Setting automatic booting and boot flags for your system disk (Section ) (also includes how to set automatic booting using EFI commands)

  • Displaying EFI boot entries and mapped OpenVMS devices, using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (Section ) (also includes how to display boot entries using EFI commands)

  • Setting the EFI boot option timeout value, using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (Section )

  • Writing a new boot block, using the OpenVMS I64 SET BOOTBLOCK command (Section )

  • Comparing Alpha and Integrity server system boot commands (Section )

Checking the ACPI Configuration for Booting OpenVMS in an nPartition

To boot your OpenVMS I64 operating system on a cell-based server, the ACPI configuration must be set correctly. The ACPI configuration value determines, among other things, the EFI Path format used when referencing devices. If your Integrity server was factory installed, the ACPI configuration is set correctly. If the nPartition on which you want to boot your OpenVMS system had previously been running a Windows or Linux system, then enter the following command at the EFI Shell prompt to set the partition to boot correctly with OpenVMS:

EFI> acpiconfig default

To make this new value take effect, you must reset the nPartition by using the EFI Shell reset command:

EFI> reset

If the ACPI configuration value is not set properly, when the operating system boots, it fails with bugcheck code INCONSTATE.

You cannot modify the ACPI configuration value for Integrity servers that do not support nPartitions (for example, the rx2600 server).

To display the current configuration value, enter the acpiconfig command with no arguments:

EFI> acpiconfig
Acpiconfig settings: default

Note:

The acpiconfig command does not necessarily report the setting that was used on the current nPartition boot stage. It reports only the current setting, which is used for the next boot of the nPartition.

Setting Boot Options for Your System Disk

You can establish and manage boot options for your system disk in any of three ways:

  • During installation or upgrade, allowing the OpenVMS I64 installation/upgrade procedure to automatically establish an EFI boot option for your system disk

  • Using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM) while the operating system is running

  • Using EFI (after the system disk has been created or updated and only while the operating system is not running)

HP recommends that you allow the OpenVMS I64 installation or upgrade procedure to establish a boot option for your system disk. However, you still have the option of modifying the boot option or adding other boot options for your system disk by using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility from the OpenVMS DCL prompt (or by using EFI itself).

The OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility is a menu-based utility that enables you to configure EFI boot options for your Integrity server. It is easier to use than EFI. With this OpenVMS utility, you can perform actions such as the following:

  • Add your system disk as an EFI boot option (you can optionally configure it to boot automatically on hardware startup and reboot).

  • Manage multiple system disks.

  • Set boot flags.

  • Display the EFI boot options.

  • Add, move, and remove boot options in the EFI Boot Manager menu.

  • Enable or disable the EFI boot countdown timer (timeout) and set the countdown value.

This section explains how to perform most of these operations (except moving and removing boot options). For more information about the OpenVMS Boot Manager utility, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials. This section also explains how to use EFI to add a boot option for automatic booting.

HP recommends that you configure your system with a boot option for your system disk. You can enable automatic reboot of the system disk by specifying your system disk as the first boot option in the EFI Boot Manager menu. When the EFI timeout (countdown) occurs, your system disk boots automatically.

Note:

To configure booting on Fibre Channel devices, you must use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility. (Use of this utility is optional for other devices but mandatory for Fibre Channel devices.) HP also recommends using this utility to add members of a multiple-member shadow set to the boot device list and dump device list. Be sure to add all members to both lists. For more information about the utility, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials. For more information about configuring and booting Fibre Channel devices, see Appendix E.

Adding a Boot Option and Setting Boot Flags

To add a boot option and set boot flags using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility, follow these steps:

  1. At the DCL prompt, enter the following command to start the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility:

    $ @SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM
  2. When the utility starts, the main menu is displayed. To add your system disk as a boot option, enter 1 at the prompt, as in the following example:

      OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager Boot Options List Management Utility
    
      (1) ADD an entry to the Boot Options list
      (2) DISPLAY the Boot Options list
      (3) REMOVE an entry from the Boot Options list
      (4) MOVE the position of an entry in the Boot Options list
      (5) VALIDATE boot options and fix them as necessary
      (6) Modify Boot Options TIMEOUT setting
    
      (B) Set to operate on the Boot Device Options list
      (D) Set to operate on the Dump Device Options list
      (G) Set to operate on the Debug Device Options list
    
      (E) EXIT from the Boot Manager utility
    
      You can also enter Ctrl-Y at any time to abort this utility
    
    Enter your choice: 1

    Note:

    While using this utility, you can change a response made to an earlier prompt by entering the caret (^) character as many times as needed. To end and return to the DCL prompt, press Ctrl/Y.

  3. The utility prompts you for the device name. Enter the system disk device you are using for this installation. In the following example, the device name is DKA0:.

    Enter the device name (enter "?" for a list of devices): DKA0:
  4. The utility prompts you for the position you want your entry to take in the EFI boot option list. To see a list of the current boot options, enter a question mark (?):

    Enter the desired position number (1,2,3,,,) of the entry.
    To display the Boot Options list, enter "?" and press Return.
    Position [1]: ?
  5. The list in the following example includes only one boot option. To add your boot option entry to the top of the list (the default) so that your system disk boots automatically when the server starts or the EFI countdown timer expires, enter 1:

    EFI Boot Options list:     Timeout = 0 secs.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    01. VenHw(d65a6b8c-71e5-4df0-d2f009a9) "EFI Shell [Built-in]"
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    1 entries found.
    
    Enter the desired position number (1,2,3,...) of the entry.
    To display the Boot Options list, enter "?" and press Return.
    Position [1]: 1
  6. The utility prompts you for OpenVMS boot flags. By default, no flags are set. Enter the OpenVMS flags (for example, 0,1), or press Enter to set no flags, as in the following example:

    Enter the value for VMS_FLAGS in the form n,n.
    VMS_FLAGS [NONE]: 

    Optionally, you can use any of the standard OpenVMS boot flags such as the following:

    Flags

    Description

    0,1Enable SYSBOOT to change system parameters; enable conversational booting for debugging purposes.
    0,2Load XDELTA.
    0,4Take the initial EXEC_INIT breakpoint.
    0,20000Print debug messages on boot.
    0,30000Print more debug messages on boot.
  7. The utility prompts you for a description to include with your boot option entry. By default, the device name is used as the description. You can enter more descriptive information as in the following example. This example shows a sample confirmation message (for devices with multiple paths, such as Fibre Channel devices, a separate confirmation message is displayed for each path). EFI$BCFG is the name of the executor file for the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility.

    Enter a short description (do not include quotation marks).
    Description ["DKA0"]: DKA0: OpenVMS V8.3-1H1 for PLMs System
    
    efi$bcfg: DKA0: (BOOT003) Option successfully added
  8. When you have successfully added your boot option, exit the utility by entering E at the prompt:

    Enter your choice: E
    $
Using EFI to Set Automatic Booting of Your System Disk

HP recommends allowing the OpenVMS installation or upgrade procedure to set your system disk to boot automatically. Or, use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM). However, you can use EFI. This section explains how to use EFI to set up your Integrity server firmware to automatically boot your OpenVMS I64 system from your system disk. (HP also recommends using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility to set boot flags. Optionally, you can use the vms_loader.efi -flags n,n command at the EFI prompt to set any of the standard OpenVMS boot flags, as documented earlier in this appendix.)

Access the EFI Shell and enter the following line at the prompt, where fsn: (such as fs0: or fs1:) is the device associated with the system disk:

Shell> bcfg boot add 1 fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi "HP OpenVMS I64"

This command adds the OpenVMS I64 operating system to position 1 in the EFI Boot Manager menu. The quoted text in the command line (“HP OpenVMS I64”) is displayed at position 1 in the EFI boot menu. You can enter any text that helps you identify the operating system disk. During system power up, the position 1 item is automatically executed after the countdown.

Alternatively, you can add an EFI boot menu option by using the EFI menu interface:

  1. Select the Boot Configuration option (or in some versions of EFI, the Boot Option Maintenance Menu).

  2. Select Add a Boot Option.

  3. Select the boot device and boot file.

    Note:

    All EFI boot options embed the disk Globally Unique ID (GUID). Therefore, if you reinstall OpenVMS or restore a system disk from an image backup, you must first delete the old boot options and then add a new boot option. To delete a boot option, use the Delete Boot Option(s) option in the Boot Configuration menu (or Boot Option Maintenance Menu).

Still another method to add a boot entry to the EFI Boot Manager menu is to use the EFI Utilities for OpenVMS (I64 only) vms_bcfg command, which accepts OpenVMS device names and also enables you to set flags. However, note that this command has limited capabilities; for example, it cannot handle Fibre Channel paths as can the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility. In the following example, DKA0: is the OpenVMS system disk being added as the first boot option:

   Shell> \efi\vms\vms_bcfg boot add 1 dka0: -fl 0,2 "HP OpenVMS I64"

For more information about EFI utilities for OpenVMS, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual.

Displaying EFI Boot Entries and Mapped OpenVMS Devices

The Integrity server EFI Boot Manager shows the various paths to the boot device. You can use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility to display the OpenVMS boot device options known to EFI.

Start the utility at the DCL prompt (@SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM) and select option 2 on the main menu (the main menu is shown in Section ). The utility displays the following prompt. In this example, the listings for the DQA0: device are requested and displayed.

   To display all entries in the Boot Options list, press Return.
   To display specific entries, enter the entry number or device name.
   (Enter "?" for a list of devices): DQA0

EFI Boot Options list:   Timeout = 20 secs.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
04. DQA0 PCI(0|0|2|0) ATA(Primary,Master) "DVD-ROM "
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1 entries found.

You can also display all bootable devices mapped by the EFI console and their equivalent OpenVMS device names by using the EFI Utilities for OpenVMS vms_show command at the EFI Shell prompt (from \efi\vms). For more information about EFI utilities for OpenVMS, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual.

Setting EFI Boot Option Countdown Timer (Timeout)

Whenever the EFI Boot Manager menu displays, it waits for you to select an option. The wait depends on the current setting of the EFI countdown timer. On some servers, the countdown timer is 10 seconds by default; on others, such as Server Blades, it might be even less. After the timer expires, EFI boots the first boot option. If the first option is not available or does not boot, EFI waits the same duration before booting the next option in the list. The OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM) allows you to change this timeout value and also to disable the countdown (so that there is no wait) and enable it.

Select option 6 on the OpenVMS I64 Boot Options main menu (the main menu is shown in Section ). The utility displays the following prompt. To change the value, enter YES and then enter the new value. In this example, the timeout value is changed to 20 seconds.

efi$bcfg: Boot Timeout period is 10 secs
    
Would you like to modify the Timeout value? (Yes/No) [NO] YES
Please enter the Timeout value in seconds: 20

 efi$bcfg: Boot Timeout period is 20 secs

To disable the timer so that automatic booting occurs instantaneously, enter 0 as the value, as in the following example:

Please enter the Timeout value in seconds: 0

 efi$bcfg: Boot Timeout is Disabled

Saving and Restoring EFI Settings

Certain EFI settings, such as the Hyper-Threading setting supported on Intel Itanium Dual-Core processors, cannot be restored if lost. HP recommends that you write down your customized EFI settings in case they are lost in a system hardware or firmware failure. You can use the EFI info cpu command or the EFI cpuconfig command to display current settings, such as the setting of the Hyper-Threading feature.

You might need to restore boot options, such as if they get lost during a firmware upgrade. You can save and restore your EFI boot path settings on Integrity servers by using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM) utility. You can also use the EFI variable -s command to save boot option variables and the variable -r command to restore them. After using the variable command to restore boot options, a reset might be required. Use the EFI Shell reset comand.

You can use the OpenVMS-specific EFI utility vms_bcfg (\efi\vms\vms_bcfg) to set boot options, and the vms_showutility (\efi\vms\vms_show) to display them; however, these utilities are more limited in scope than the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility. For example, they cannot work with Fibre Channel boot paths as can the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility. You can use the EFI variable command to restore the boot options list from a previously saved file.

You could also use the EFI Shell variable command to restore variables such as boot path options; you must have first saved them in a known location by using the variable -save command. For more information, see the service manual provided for your Integrity server.

Writing a New Boot Block

The boot block structures on the system disk contain the size and location of the boot partition and other details relevant to the bootstrap of OpenVMS I64. The size and location of the boot partition stored within the boot block structures must be maintained and must reference the current location of the OpenVMS file SYS$EFI.SYS.

Current versions of BACKUP maintain the boot block structures as well as the size and location of the boot partition during image operations (analogous to the similar BACKUP/IMAGE operations that maintain the boot block on OpenVMS Alpha disks). Older versions of BACKUP do not maintain these structures and do not correctly locate core OpenVMS I64 bootstrap files.

If the boot partition file SYS$EFI.SYS is manually replaced or relocated, you must use the DCL command SET BOOTBLOCK or the SYS$SETBOOT image to rewrite the boot block structures. The SET BOOTBLOCK command and SYS$SETBOOT are analogous to the OpenVMS Alpha Writeboot utility; they provide OpenVMS I64 with the equivalent of what the Writeboot utility provides on OpenVMS Alpha.

Note:

Do not use the OpenVMS Alpha Writeboot utility to rewrite boot block structures on an OpenVMS I64 system disk.

The SET BOOTBLOCK command enables you to establish the boot block pointers necessary for the EFI console to find and bootstrap an OpenVMS I64 system disk. You must use this command if the target OpenVMS I64 system disk was originally created by one of the following methods:

  • A version of BACKUP that does not support the OpenVMS I64 system disk structure. HP recommends that you do not use these versions of BACKUP for archiving or restoring an OpenVMS I64 system disk.

  • A nonimage backup of an OpenVMS I64 system disk (possibly corrupting the boot block and various directory backlinks that must be manually reset). HP recommends that you do not use nonimage backups.

  • A nonimage restore of an OpenVMS I64 system disk from an image save set. HP recommends that you do not use a nonimage restoration.

Note:

If the target OpenVMS I64 system disk has an incorrectly-placed [000000]GPT.SYS file, the disk cannot be used reliably as an OpenVMS I64 system disk. Typically, the file gets incorrectly placed due to the use of an older version of BACKUP/IMAGE, a file-based BACKUP disk restoration, or an errant disk defragmentation tool (the file is set with /NOMOVE to disable move operations; defragmentation tools that do not honor this setting will corrupt the file). A correctly-located GPT.SYS file will have at least two file extents, the first beginning at LBN 0 and the last at the disk capacity minus the size of the last extent (an extent is one or more adjacent clusters allocated to a file). The size of each of the two extents varies according to the disk cluster factor on the target disk. The first extent size is currently 34 or more blocks, and the last extent 33 or more blocks. For example:

$  DUMP/HEADER/BLOCK=END=0 SYS$SYSDEVICE:[000000]GPT.SYS ...
Map area
   Retrieval pointers:
        Count:          36    LBN:          0
        Count:          36    LBN:   71132925

This example is from a disk with 71132960 blocks. The placement of the final extent is 71132924, which is calculated by subtracting 36 (the size of the last extent) from the disk capacity (71132960).

You may be able to temporarily recover from this condition and attempt to bootstrap the target OpenVMS I64 system disk by renaming GPT.SYS to GPT.BAD, and then entering the SET BOOTBLOCK command. To correctly recover from this condition, you must INITIALIZE the target disk and then reload the disk contents using a file-based BACKUP restoration or a file-based COPY operation. No supported means exists for adding a GPT.SYS file onto an existing disk nor for adding the file during a BACKUP/IMAGE restoration operation.

To write the boot block structures onto an OpenVMS I64 system disk, enter the SET BOOTBLOCK command using the following format:

$ SET BOOTBLOCK [/PRESERVE=SIGNATURES] [/I64] [boot-partition-name]

You can specify the file name for the boot partition (boot-partition-name). If you do not specify a file or device name, the command defaults to the following file for the boot partition:

SYS$SYSDEVICE:[VMS$COMMON.SYS$LDR]SYS$EFI.SYS

The command also assumes the current architecture. To specify OpenVMS I64, include /I64 in the command line.

Use the /PRESERVE=SIGNATURES qualifier to preserve the existing GUID disk signature value and the associated root aliases. Note that using the OpenVMS Backup utility creates a new disk signature when restoring a bootable disk image.

If you reset the boot block structures, you might need to remove any EFI boot aliases that reference the disk, and then add them back again. You can use the EFI alias command to remove and add aliases; HP recommends using the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM) to maintain EFI console boot aliases.

Note:

The boot partition file must be contiguous and movefile operations on the file must be disabled. If the file is not contiguous, use the DCL command COPY/CONTIGUOUS (or equivalent) to re-create a contiguous version of the file. To disable movefile operations, use the DCL command SET FILE/NOMOVE. This prevents bootstrap failures that could result from the normal and expected operations of disk defragmentation tools.

Alternatively, you can write a boot block by entering the following command:

$ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:SYS$SETBOOT

The utility prompts you for the required input (in a way similar to the operation of the OpenVMS Alpha Writeboot utility).

Alpha and Equivalent Integrity Server System Boot Commands

The Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) on Integrity servers performs most of the same functions that the SRM console does on Alpha processors. If you are familiar with the Alpha tool, use the following table to find EFI commands equivalent to the Alpha commands you commonly use on Alpha systems. Note that some of the commands listed might not be available on certain hardware systems.

Alpha and Integrity Server EFI Command Equivalents

TaskAlpha SRM command at P00> promptIntegrity Server EFI command at Shell prompt

Display help information

HELP

help

Display list and version of devices found on the most recently initialized systemSHOW CONFIGURATION or SHOW VERSIONinfo fw
Display devices and controllers in the system, including bootable devices and mappingsSHOW DEVICE
map
vms_show devices(from \efi\vms)[a]
Display all system informationSHOW FRU
info all
pci
info io

Display memory information

SHOW MEMORYinfo mem
Display volume information of the file systemSHOW DEV DKA0vol fs0

Display hardware information about CPU resources

SHOW CONFIGURATION

info cpu

Display power status

SHOW POWER

info all[b]
Set system dump disk

SET DUMP_DEV disk1, disk2...

vms_set dump_dev disk1, disk2, ... (from \efi\vms)[a]

Set boot flagsSET BOOT_OSFLAGS 0,0set vms_flags "0,0"[a]
Set boot behavior to automatic bootSET AUTO_ACTION BOOTbcfg boot add 1 fsx:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi "I64"[a]
Change the current boot optionSET AUTO_ACTION HALTbcfg boot mv 1 2[a]

[a] Similar functionality is provided by the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM), launched at the OpenVMS DCL prompt. Regarding the display of devices, BOOT_OPTIONS.COM displays only the boot entries and also a selected dump device for DOSD and a debug device; vms_show can display all devices mapped by the EFI console and their equivalent OpenVMS device names. The map command shows all devices currently mapped on the EFI Shell.

[b] Best source of information about power status is the MP PS command.

Booting Operations

This section describes various methods for booting your OpenVMS I64 operating system.

Note:

To boot your OpenVMS I64 operating system, you can use a VGA graphics device (except on an rx2600 Integrity server or other servers that lack the firmware capabilities), a serial device, or a network interface for the console. For information about setting up the console on your Integrity server, see Section .

When using a VGA console and installing from vMedia or a USB DVD drive with the keyboard plugged into a USB hub, if the keyboard does not respond, simply unplug the hub and plug it back in.

Note:

HP Integrity servers maintain a system event log (SEL) within system console storage, and OpenVMS I64 automatically transfers the contents of the SEL into the OpenVMS error log. During a successful boot operation while using a console, you might see a message indicating that the BMC SEL is full. You can safely continue when the BMC SEL is full by following the prompts; OpenVMS processes the contents of the SEL.

HP recommends that the latest system firmware be loaded and used. For more information about updating the system firmware, see Section . For midrange and high-end Integrity servers, contact HP Customer Support to update your firmware.

Overview of Booting on a Cell-Based Server

This section gives an overview of booting the nPartition hardware and booting OpenVMS on an nPartition.

Booting the nPartition Hardware

Each nPartition runs its own firmware and has its own system boot environment. You can boot an nPartition independently of any other nPartitions in the same server complex.

The nPartition boot process includes two phases: the cell boot phase and the nPartition boot phase. Note that these phases occur only as part of the hardware boot process, not as part of the operating system boot.

  • Cell boot phase—This phase occurs when cells are powered on or reset. The main activities during this phase are the power-on-self-test activities. During this phase, cells operate independently of other cells in the complex. Cells do not necessarily proceed through this phase at the same pace, because each cell may have a different amount of hardware to discover and test, or cells might be reset or powered on at different times.

  • nPartition boot phase—This phase occurs when an nPartition has been booted, after its cells have completed their self tests. During this phase, “nPartition rendezvous” occurs, in which each cell contacts the other active cells in the nPartition and selects a core cell that is responsible for managing the rest of the nPartition boot process. A processor on the core cell runs the nPartition EFI system boot environment. When the operating system boot process is initiated, the core cell passes control to the operating system loader.

You can view progress of these phases by using the Virtual Front Panel (VFP) to check the nPartition boot state. Access VFP from the MP main menu.

For information about how to boot the nPartition hardware, see your hardware documentation.

Booting OpenVMS I64 on an nPartition

Caution:

To prevent loss of data when booting your OpenVMS I64 operating system, note the following:

  • You must first ensure that the nPartition has its ACPI configuration set to the default (see Section ).

  • OpenVMS I64 does not support using cell local memory (CLM). The nPartition on which OpenVMS I64 is booted must have all memory configured as interleaved memory (memory that can be mapped across more than one cell). Although you might be able to run OpenVMS I64 on an nPartition that has cell local memory configured, such a configuration is untested and is not supported. To check cell local memory configuration details, use the Partition Manager or the parstatus command. For more information, see the nPartition Administrator's Guide (previously titled HP System Partitions Guide: Administration for nPartitions) or the following website:

    http://docs.hp.com/en/PARMGR2/

    You can also use the EFI Shell info mem command. If the reported “NonInterleaved Memory” is less than 512 MB, the cell is configured completely as interleaved memory (the indicated amount of noninterleaved memory is used by the firmware). If the command reports more than 512 MB of noninterleaved memory, use Partition Manager or the parstatus command to confirm the CLM configuration details.

As with all Integrity servers that run OpenVMS, you can boot OpenVMS I64 either by selecting a boot entry from the EFI Boot Manager or by starting the system loader (VMS_LOADER.EFI) from the EFI Shell. To boot OpenVMS I64, access the nPartition console and use either of these two methods:

  • From the EFI Boot Manager, select the OpenVMS I64 boot entry from the boot options list and press Enter.

  • From the EFI Shell, start the OpenVMS system loader by entering the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: (such as fs1:) is the device associated with the OpenVMS I64 system disk:

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi

    When starting the VMS_LOADER.EFI system loader, you must either specify its full path (as shown in this example) or start it from the \efi\vms directory. For more information, see Section .

    For booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD, the path is different. Enter the following command instead:

    Shell> fsn:efi\boot\bootia64.efi

Note:

The nPartition must be at EFI before beginning the OpenVMS I64 boot process. If the nPartition is not at EFI, you can use VFP to check the nPartition boot state. An nPartition might be inactive or cells might be powered off. If VFP indicates that all cells in the nPartition are in the boot-is-blocked (BIB) state, the nPartition is inactive and you must use the MP bo command to boot the nPartition past BIB and make it active. For more information, see your hardware documentation.

Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD from the Local Drive

To boot the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD, follow these steps. To boot the DVD on a cell-based server, a DVD device must be accessible for the nPartition that OpenVMS is being installed on.

  1. Make sure your Integrity server is powered on. If your system has an attached external device, make sure it is turned on and operational.

  2. Insert the DVD into the drive.

  3. Cycle power.

  4. From the main EFI boot menu (for cell-based servers, this must be the EFI boot menu for the nPartition on which OpenVMS is to be booted), select the appropriate item from the boot options list. Note that the EFI boot menu is timed; press any key to stop the countdown timer.

    For some systems, the boot option to select is the Internal Bootable DVD option. If that option is not listed in your EFI boot menu, move to the Boot From a File menu and select the Removable Media Boot option, if present.

    Alternatively (and this method is recommended for cell-based servers), boot the DVD drive from the EFI Shell prompt by entering the command shown in the following example, where fsn: corresponds to the Integrity server DVD drive (such as fs0:). Note that if you have navigated to a particular file system, the EFI Shell prompt would reflect that file system; for example, if the current file system is fs0:, the EFI Shell prompt would be fs0:>.

    Shell> fsn:\efi\boot\bootia64.efi

    To determine which device is the bootable DVD drive, examine the list of mapped devices and look for an fs device listing that includes the text CDROM, as in the following example, where fsn is the file system associated with the drive, which is usually fs0: (instead of fsn, you might see something like V8.3-1H1; instead of Ata, you might see Scsi, depending on the server model):

    fsn : Acpi(HWP0002,400)/Pci(4|1)/Ata(Primary,Master)/CDROM(Entry0)

    Use the vms_show dev command to display the mapping of various EFI device names to OpenVMS device names, as in the following example where fsn is the device you want to check (such as fs0:):

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_show dev -fs

    For more information about the vms_show command, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual.

    Note:

    By default, certain versions of EFI might interpret the Delete (or Backspace) key differently than do OpenVMS Alpha systems or Microsoft Windows computers. In such cases, press Ctrl/H to delete the last character entered. For more information, see Section .

    When the DVD boots properly, the OpenVMS operating system banner is displayed, followed by the operating system menu. You can now install your OpenVMS I64 operating system onto the target disk; see Section . If the DVD fails to boot properly use the alternate method of booting described in Section .

    Note:

    When booting OpenVMS from the installation DVD for the first time on any OpenVMS I64 system with a SAN storage device, you might experience a delay in EFI initialization because the entire SAN is scanned. Depending on the size of the SAN, this delay might range from several seconds to several minutes.

Alternate Method of Using EFI to Boot the DVD

If the DVD does not boot using the methods described above, follow these steps:

  1. To ensure that EFI can access the DVD, enter the following commands at the EFI Shell prompt of a entry-class or single-cell Integrity server. Enter the commands in the order shown. (The EFI Shell prompt may not necessarily be Shell> as in this example; it could be a prompt that reflects the current file system, such as fs0:>.)

    Shell> reconnect -r
    Shell> map -r

    For a multiple-cell nPartition on a cell-based server, use the search allcommand instead of the reconnect -r command, followed by the map -r command. See your hardware documentation for more information about EFI commands.

    The reconnect -r command discovers any devices added after booting the server. The search all command discovers all devices including any that were not in the boot options list or connected to the core cell’s I/O chassis. (On large server systems, the search all command could take significant time to complete. You can reduce the search time by specifying a more directed search, such as for a specific I/O chassis connected to a cell or a specific PCI card in a chassis. For more information, see the help information provided for the search command.)

    The map -r command remaps and rebuilds the list of known devices that have a bootable EFI system partition. For a multiple-cell nPartition on a cell-based server, if you insert the DVD after EFI is loaded, you must use the search command to allow EFI to detect the inserted DVD; otherwise, EFI would not recognize the DVD in the DVD drive. When EFI detects a valid, bootable DVD in the DVD drive, it maps an fs device to it and lists that device in the mapping table displayed by the map -r command.

  2. To boot the DVD, enter the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: is the Integrity server DVD drive (such as fs0:).

    Shell> fsn:\efi\boot\bootia64.efi

    If this command does not work, or if you have doubts about which device maps to the DVD drive, you can use the EFI Boot Manager menu system to boot the OE DVD, as described in the following steps:

    1. From the main EFI boot menu, select the Boot Configuration option (or in some versions of EFI, the Boot Option Maintenance Menu).

    2. From the Boot Configuration menu, select the Boot From a File option.

    3. From the Boot From a File menu, select the menu item that includes the text CDROM, as in the following example, and press Enter.

      Note:

      The contents of the screens shown in the following examples vary according to the firmware and devices installed on your Integrity server.

      EFI Boot from a File Menu
    4. A screen is displayed that shows the top-level directory structure of the DVD, similar to the screen in the following example. Select the efi directory.

      EFI Top-Level Directory of DVD
    5. The next screen to appear shows the first level of subdirectories below the top level, similar to the following example. Select the boot directory (it contains the boot file).

      EFI
First Level of Subdirectories of DVD
    6. The next screen displays the files within the boot directory. Select the file named bootia64.efi.

      EFI Display of Files Within Boot Directory of
DVD

Booting the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD from the InfoServer

To boot from a virtual DVD drive on the LAN using OpenVMS I64 InfoServer software, you must initially perform certain configuration steps (one time only). These steps and the instructions on performing the network boot are described in Appendix C.

Booting an Image of the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD Using HP SIM Provisioning

To use HP SIM provisioning to boot an image of the OpenVMS OE DVD, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only). For these steps and the booting instructions, see Appendix D. For upgrades, your OpenVMS boot flags must be set to (0,0).

Booting an Image of the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD Using vMedia

To use vMedia to boot an image of the OpenVMS OE DVD, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only); see Section . For instructions on booting with vMedia, see Section .

Booting from a Fibre Channel Device

For instructions on booting from a Fibre Channel (FC) storage device, see Appendix E.

Booting Manually from the Local System Disk

HP recommends setting up your Integrity server EFI console with a boot option for your OpenVMS I64 operating system disk. In this way, booting the system disk simply requires selecting the boot option from the EFI Boot Manager boot options list. You can set the EFI boot option to boot automatically on powering on or rebooting. The OpenVMS installation and upgrade procedures can assist you in adding and validating a boot option for your system disk; you can also use the OpenVMS I64 Boot Manager utility (SYS$MANAGER:BOOT_OPTIONS.COM), as explained in Section .

The steps that follow explain how to boot the OpenVMS I64 operating system disk manually. You can also use vMedia to boot an OpenVMS system disk; see Section .

Note:

If you have recently booted the OpenVMS I64 OE DVD, make sure you remove this DVD before booting the system disk.

On Integrity server systems, the system disk must be mounted locally (on the system you are booting) or on a SAN storage device.

  1. If OpenVMS is not running, skip to the next step. If OpenVMS is running, access the EFI console by shutting down the operating system (see the instructions in Section ).

  2. Boot the system disk manually by entering the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: (such as fs1:) is the device associated with the system disk:

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi

    You must either specify the full path (as shown in this example) or start the system loader from the \efi\vms directory. For more information, see Section .

Performing a Conversational (Interactive) Boot

A conversational boot is most commonly used in research and development environments and during software upgrades. Perform a conversational boot to stop the boot process before it completes. The boot process stops after it loads SYS$SYSTEM:SYSBOOT.EXE and displays the SYSBOOT> prompt. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, you can enter specific OpenVMS System Generation utility (SYSGEN) commands to do the following:

  • Examine system parameter values

  • Change system parameter values

  • Specify another parameter file

  • Specify another system startup command procedure

  • Select the default system parameter file (IA64VMSSYS.PAR) if you modified system parameters to values that render the system unbootable

  • Specify a minimum startup

There are several ways to perform a conversational boot. The following procedure is the most direct:

IF ... THEN GO TO...

The OpenVMS I64 operating system is running.

Step 1

The OpenVMS I64 operating system is not running.

Step 4

  1. Log in to the SYSTEM account.

  2. Enter the following command:

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
  3. Answer the questions displayed by the system. When the procedure asks whether an automatic reboot should be performed, press Enter for NO. When the procedure is finished, it displays the following message:

       SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE
  4. Halt the system or nPartition. (See Section  for more information about how to halt your Integrity server).

  5. Begin the conversational boot by entering the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: is the device (such as fs1:) associated with the system disk:

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi -flags 0,1
  6. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, you can enter any of the SYSGEN commands listed in Table B.2. For more information about these SYSGEN commands, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: M-Z.

  7. When you finish using the SYSGEN commands, enter the CONTINUE command to complete the boot process.

SYSGEN Commands Used in the SYSBOOT Procedure

Command Description

CONTINUE

Resumes the boot procedure.

DISABLE CHECKS

Inhibits checking of parameter values specified with the SET command.

ENABLE CHECKS

Permits checking of parameter values specified with the SET command.

HELP

Displays a summary of the SYSBOOT commands on the terminal screen.

SET parameter-name

Establishes the value of a system parameter.

SET/STARTUP

Sets the name of the system startup command procedure.

SHOW [parameter]

Displays active, current, default, maximum, and minimum values for specific parameters. (Use qualifiers to display characteristics of parameters grouped by categories.)

USE [file-spec]

Specifies a parameter file to be used as a source of values. You must enter the entire file specification, including device and directory; you cannot specify a logical name.

USE DEFAULT

Specifies that default values be used for all parameters.

For examples of conversational booting, see Section  and Section .

Booting with Minimum Startup

In certain cases, you might want to boot your system without performing the full sequence of startup events. For example, if a startup event prevents you from logging in, you might want to boot the system without executing the startup so that you can log in and fix the problem. You can use the conversational boot to specify a minimum startup.

Note:

Because this procedure bypasses specific startup operations, it does not autoconfigure the system's peripheral devices.

Boot the system with minimum startup as follows:

  1. Begin the conversational boot by entering the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: is the device (such as fs1:) associated with the system disk and the system root is [SYS0...]:

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi -flags 0,1
  2. Enter the following command:

    SYSBOOT> SET STARTUP_P1 "MIN"
  3. Enter the following command to ensure that the operating system does not record for subsequent system reboots the STARTUP_P1 parameter change you made in step 2:

    SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
  4. Enter the following command to continue booting:

    SYSBOOT> CONTINUE

Booting with the XDelta Utility (XDELTA)

The XDelta utility (XDELTA) is a debugging tool that system programmers use. The procedure for booting all Integrity servers with XDELTA is the same.

The following table describes the valid values you can specify when booting with XDELTA:

ValueSystem Response

0

Normal, nonstop boot (default).

1

Begins a conversational boot and then displays the SYSBOOT prompt.

2

Includes XDELTA but does not take the initial breakpoint.

3

Displays the SYSBOOT prompt and includes XDELTA but does not take the initial breakpoint.

6

Includes XDELTA and takes the initial breakpoint.

7

Includes XDELTA, displays the SYSBOOT prompt, and takes the initial breakpoint at system initialization.

The following is an example of booting with XDELTA from fs1: at the EFI> prompt:

EFI> fs1:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi -flags 0,7

For more information about using XDELTA, see the HP OpenVMS Delta/XDelta Debugger Manual.

Booting from a Different Root Directory

By default, the OpenVMS I64 operating system is installed in the system root directory [SYS0]. However, if you have created a cluster system disk, you can use the SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG_LAN.COM procedure to add a copy of the operating system to a different root directory. (For more information about using the SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG_LAN.COM procedure, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual .)

To boot from a different root (for example, [SYS3]), enter the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: (such as fs1:) is the device associated with the system disk:

Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi -flags 3,0

Emergency Booting

If a system problem prevents your system from booting, you might need to perform an emergency boot operation. Table B.3 summarizes these emergency boot operations, and the sections that follow describe each boot operation in more detail.

Emergency Boot Procedures

OperationWhen to Use

Booting with default system parameters

When parameter values in the parameter file have been modified so that the system is unbootable

Booting without startup and login procedures

If an error in the startup or login procedure prevents you from logging in

Booting without the user authorization file

If you have forgotten the password and cannot log in to a privileged account

Booting with Default System Parameters

If the current values stored in the parameter file have been incorrectly modified, these incorrect values might cause the system to become unbootable. With a conversational boot operation, you can reset the active values for all system parameters to the default value. (In most cases, HP recommends that you use AUTOGEN to modify system parameters. In certain cases, however, you can use a conversational boot to modify a parameter value temporarily. To change a parameter value permanently, you must edit MODPARAMS.DAT and run AUTOGEN. For instructions, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.) The default values allow you to boot the system temporarily so you can correct the problem.

How to Perform This Task
  1. Begin the conversational boot by entering the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: (such as fs1:) is the device associated with the system disk:

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi -flags 0,1
  2. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, enter the following command:

    SYSBOOT> USE DEFAULT

    The USE DEFAULT command specifies that default values should be used for all parameters.

  3. To avoid starting all layered products on a system that is not tuned for them, possibly causing the system to hang, set the STARTUP_P1 system parameter as follows:

    SYSBOOT> SET STARTUP_P1 "MIN"
  4. Enter the following command to ensure that the operating system does not record for subsequent system reboots the STARTUP_P1 parameter change you made in step 3:

    SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
  5. Enter the following command to continue booting:

    SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
  6. When the system finishes booting, determine which changed parameter caused the problem and reset the parameter value. If you specified the value for the parameter in the AUTOGEN parameter file MODPARAMS.DAT, fix the value in that file and run AUTOGEN. For more information, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

  7. After your system runs for at least 24 hours, run AUTOGEN in feedback mode, following the steps described in Section . Be sure to examine the AGEN$PARAMS.REPORT, as recommended. If necessary, modify system parameters as instructed in Section . If you need assistance, contact your software support representative. Once you feel confident that the problem is corrected, and AUTOGEN has been run through the SETPARAMS phase, reboot the system.

Example
SYSBOOT> USE DEFAULT                        
SYSBOOT> SET STARTUP_P1 "MIN"
SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
SYSBOOT> CONTINUE 
Username: SYSTEM
Password:
$ EDIT SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT
     .
     .
     .
   [Insert line(s) to reset parameter value(s)]
     .
     .
     .

Booting Without Startup and Login Procedures

If the system does not complete the startup procedures or does not allow you to log in, you might need to bypass the startup and login procedures. The startup and login procedures provided by HP should always work. However, if you introduce an error when you modify the startup or login procedure, you could accidentally lock yourself out of the system.

How to Perform This Task
  1. Begin the conversational boot by entering the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: (such as fs1:) is the device associated with the system disk:

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi -flags 0,1
  2. Enter the following command at the SYSBOOT> prompt:

    SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
  3. Enter the following command to ensure that the operating system does not record for subsequent system reboots the STARTUP_P1 parameter change you made in step 2:

    SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
  4. Enter the following command to continue booting:

    SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
  5. When the system is booted, the operator console displays the DCL command prompt ($). You are now logged in.

  6. Enter the following two DCL commands:

    $ SPAWN
    $ SET NOON

    The SPAWN command enables you to stay connected to the console, and the second command instructs the operating system to ignore any errors that might occur. If you do not enter these commands and you invoke an error, the system logs you out. Without the SPAWN command, you are logged out when the startup procedure completes in step 8.

  7. Correct the error condition that caused the login failure. (That is, make the necessary repairs to the startup or login procedure, or to the SYSUAF.DAT file.)

    Use a text editor to correct the startup or login file. Note that some system displays might not support a screen-mode editor. You can also copy a corrected file and delete the incorrect version by using the RENAME and DELETE commands.

  8. Perform a normal startup by entering the following command:

    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP
Example

SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
$ SPAWN
$ SET NOON
$ SET DEFAULT SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSEXE]
$ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP

Booting Without a User Authorization File

Ordinarily, the startup and login procedures provided by HP work; however, certain conditions can cause them to fail. A simple way to lock yourself out of the system is to set passwords to login accounts and forget them. Another way to be locked out is if one or more core system Product Authorization Key (PAK) software licenses are unavailable or expired. In such emergencies, perform a conversational emergency boot by performing the steps given in this section.

How to Perform This Task
  1. Halt the system or nPartition. (See Section  for more information about how to halt your Integrity server.)

  2. Begin the conversational boot by entering the following command at the EFI Shell prompt, where fsn: (such as fs1:) is the device associated with the system disk:

    Shell> fsn:\efi\vms\vms_loader.efi -flags 0,1

    You need your hardware system’s password for logging in to the console. By default, both the user name and password are set to Admin. If you do not have this password, contact HP Customer Support to reset the hardware console password.

  3. Enter the following commands at the SYSBOOT> prompt:

    SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
    SYSBOOT> SET WINDOW_SYSTEM 0
    SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
    SYSBOOT> CONTINUE

    The first three commands request the following:

    • OpenVMS read the system startup commands directly from the system console.

    • The windowing system (if any) not start.

    • OpenVMS not record the parameter changes for subsequent system reboots.

    The last command causes the booting to continue.

  4. At the DCL prompt, the system now accepts startup commands directly from the console. Enter the following two commands. These commands allow a normal system startup while you are left logged in on the console. Without the SPAWN command, you are logged out when the startup completes.

    $ SPAWN
    $ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP
  5. Once you log out of this session, the system completes the startup and can be used normally. Optionally, you can choose to reboot the system.

Example

SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
SYSBOOT> SET WINDOW_SYSTEM 0
SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
$ SPAWN
$ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP
$

Note:

Instead of using the SET/STARTUP OPA0: command in emergency conditions, you can set the UAFALTERNATE system parameter to use the alternate authorization file rather than the standard user authorization file. Setting the system parameter UAFALTERNATE defines the logical name SYSUAF to refer to the file SYS$SYSTEM:SYSUAFALT.DAT. If this file is found during a normal login, the system uses it to validate the account and prompts you for the user name and password.

HP does not recommend this method. If an alternate SYSUAFALT.DAT file has been configured on your system, the UAFALTERNATE method will likely fail (assuming you do not know the password for the privileged account stored within the SYSUAFALT.DAT file). In addition, the OPA0: system console is critical to system operations and system security and allows access when the SYSUAF system authorization database is unavailable or corrupted; when core product license PAKs are not registered, are expired, or are disabled; and in various system failures.

Halt and Shutdown Procedures

The following sections describe halt and shutdown procedures for Integrity servers and OpenVMS I64.

Halting the Integrity Server to Recover from Hangs and Crashes

If your system hangs and you want to force a crash, you can use MP, if available. Use the tccommand. Confirm your intention when prompted. The tc command forces a crash dump. You can reset the machine (without forcing a crash) by using the MP rscommand.

For cell-based servers, when you enter the tc or rs command, you are first prompted to select the partition for which you want the operating system shut down.

Alternatively, when the operating system controls the console, press Ctrl/P. The next step taken by the system depends on whether XDELTA is loaded:

  • If XDELTA is loaded, the system enters XDELTA after you press Ctrl/P. The system displays the instruction pointer and current instructions. You can force a crash from XDELTA by entering ;C, as in the following example:

    $
    Console Brk at 8068AD40
    8068AD40!                  add    r16 = r24, r16 ;; (New IPL = 3)
     ;C
  • If XDELTA is not loaded, pressing Ctrl/P causes the system to enter the IPC facility. Pressing Ctrl/P within the utility brings the “Crash? (Y/N)” prompt. Enter Y to cause the system to crash and to bring you eventually to EFI. If you enter any other character, the system returns back to the IPC facility.

Shutting Down the System

Before you shut down the operating system, decide if you want it to reboot automatically or if you want to enter console-mode commands after the shutdown completes. If you want the system to reboot automatically after the shutdown, first set up automatic booting, as described in Section .

You can perform the following two types of shutdown operations, as discussed in the indicated sections:

  • An orderly shutdown with SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN.COM (see Section )

  • An emergency shutdown with OPCCRASH.EXE (see Section )

Orderly Shutdown

The SHUTDOWN.COM procedure shuts down the operating system while performing maintenance functions such as disabling future logins, stopping the batch and printer queues, dismounting volumes, and stopping user processes. To use the SHUTDOWN.COM command procedure, log in to the SYSTEM account, enter the following command:

$ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN

For more information about the SHUTDOWN.COM command procedure, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

On cell-based Integrity servers, two special types of nPartition reboot are supported: reboot for reconfiguration, which reboots an nPartition and enables cell configuration changes to occur, and shutdown for reconfiguration, which puts an nPartition into an inactive state.

  • To perform a reboot for reconfiguration from OpenVMS I64 running on an nPartition, enter the OpenVMS @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN command, and then answer YES to the prompt that asks whether to perform an automatic system reboot.

    On cell-based Integrity servers, an operating system reboot is equivalent to a reboot for reconfiguration. Performing a reboot for reconfiguration enables any cell assignment changes for the nPartition (for example, removing an active cell or activating a newly added cell).

    The reboot for reconfiguration takes all cells assigned to the nPartition through a cell boot phase. The cells with a Yes use-on-next-boot attribute proceed through the nPartition boot phase to become active cells whose resources are available to software running on the nPartition.

  • To perform a shutdown for reconfiguration of an nPartition running OpenVMS I64, first enter the OpenVMS @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN command and then answer NO to the prompt asking whether to perform an automatic system reboot. Next, access MP and use the rr command (specify the OpenVMS nPartition to shut down for reconfiguration).

    A shutdown for reconfiguration takes all cells assigned to the nPartition through a cell boot phase and then stops their boot progress at the boot-is-blocked (BIB) state. When all cells assigned to the nPartition are at the BIB state, the nPartition is inactive and no software can run on the nPartition until it is manually booted past BIB.

    To boot an inactive nPartition past BIB, use the MP bo command and specify which nPartition to make active. Booting past the BIB state involves all cells that are assigned to the nPartition and that have a Yes use-on-next-boot attribute. The cells are taken through the nPartition boot phase to become active cells whose resources are available to software running on the nPartition.

For more information about shutting down an Integrity server or an nPartition, see the appropriate hardware documentation.

Emergency Shutdown with OPCCRASH.EXE

If you cannot perform an orderly shutdown with the SHUTDOWN.COM procedure, run the OPCCRASH.EXE emergency shutdown program. To run the OPCCRASH.EXE program, log in to the SYSTEM account and enter the following command:

$ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:OPCCRASH

For more information about the OPCCRASH program, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 1: Essentials.

On cell-based Integrity servers, entering the OpenVMS RUN SYS$SYSTEM:OPCCRASH command results in the system dumping memory and then halting at the P00>>> prompt. To reset the nPartition following OPCRASH, access the nPartition console and press any key to reboot.

Using the MP tc command to reset an nPartition results in the system dumping memory and then automatically resetting the nPartition.

Troubleshooting Procedures

The following sections describe procedures that you can follow if you encounter problems with your system.

If the System Does Not Boot

If the system does not boot because a hardware problem occurs, a question mark (?) usually precedes the error message displayed on the console terminal. An example of a hardware problem is a read error on a disk. Another is a BIB condition in an nPartition on a cell-based server. You can use VFP to check the nPartition boot state. If VFP indicates that all cells in the nPartition are at BIB, the nPartition is inactive and you must use the MP bo command to boot the nPartition past BIB and make it active.

One way to get to the EFI Boot Manager to attempt to reboot is to use the MP rs command.

For more information about using VFP and MP, see your hardware documentation.

For Hardware Problems

If you suspect a hardware problem, do the following:

  1. Consult the hardware manual for your Integrity server.

  2. Contact HP Customer Support.

For Software Problems

When the operating system is loaded into memory, a message similar to the following is displayed on the terminal screen:

   SYSTEM   job terminated at 27-JUL-2007 15:05:03.17

If the system does not display this message, a software problem has probably occurred. Do the following:

  1. Turn off the system. Turn it back on and try to reboot.

  2. Perform a conversational boot using the default system parameters or try one of the emergency boot procedures described in Section .

  3. If the system boots, run the AUTOGEN procedure. For more information about the AUTOGEN procedure, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

Detecting and Responding to System Problems

If your system exhibits unexpected behavior, note the following:

  • If the system displays a bugcheck message on the console terminal and shuts itself down, it means the system encountered a problem that made further operation impossible or dangerous. If the system does not reboot automatically, reboot the system manually as described in Section .

  • If the system stops responding to your commands (that is, if the system hangs), there is a possible failure in a system software or hardware component or a possible power failure.

  • If the system exhibits erratic behavior (it does not respond according to specifications), it indicates a possible failure in a system software or hardware component.

To determine whether the failure is a system problem:

  • Be sure that you did not press F1 (Hold Screen). The Hold Screen light turns on when you press either F1 or Ctrl/S.

  • Press Ctrl/T to check the status of your process. A status line should appear indicating the name of the program that is executing and other information. If the status line does not appear, the program you are executing might be stalled or hanging. (If you have disabled Ctrl/T by entering the command SET NOCONTROL=T, or if you have set the terminal to NOBROADCAST mode by entering the command SET TERMINAL/NOBROADCAST, this procedure does not work.)

  • Make sure the cable connecting the terminal or monitor to the system is secure.

If you determine that you have a system problem, take the following steps:

  1. Force an exit from a stalled or hanging program by pressing Ctrl/Y. Note that pressing Ctrl/Y causes any work performed by the program and not saved on disk to be lost.

  2. If the system is still unresponsive, halt it (see Section  for more information.)

  3. Note in detail the sequence of events that caused the problem and notify HP Customer Support.

Appendix C Setting Up and Performing Network Booting

This appendix explains the steps required to enable your system to boot over the LAN using the OpenVMS InfoServer utility, a software application available on OpenVMS Alpha (Version 8.3 or later) and OpenVMS I64 (Version 8.2-1 or later) systems. It also describes how to boot the virtual DVD/CD drive from the network.

About the OpenVMS InfoServer Utility

InfoServer network booting is supported for OpenVMS installations and upgrades on any OpenVMS Alpha system and on any Integrity servers that support OpenVMS. For OpenVMS I64 systems, InfoServer network booting is supported on all LAN cards (also referred to as LAN devices or adapters) that are supported by EFI.

For both OpenVMS Alpha and I64 Version 8.3-1H1 installations and upgrades, you can boot from a virtual DVD/CD drive on the LAN using the OpenVMS InfoServer utility. You can use the OpenVMS InfoServer software application on all Version 8.2-1 or later OpenVMS I64 systems as well as on any OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 systems that support a DVD drive. This support provides the additional advantage of allowing a network administrator to boot multiple OpenVMS systems on the network from a single copy of the OpenVMS distribution CD or DVD.

Using the InfoServer utility on Integrity servers for network booting requires several one-time-only configuration steps unique to OpenVMS I64. Likewise, using the InfoServer utility on OpenVMS Alpha servers requires an additional, one-time-only software configuration step. Any configuration procedures that might have been performed for network booting using an InfoServer hardware system (traditionally used by Alpha systems) are not valid for the OpenVMS I64 or OpenVMS Alpha InfoServer application.

Booting from the InfoServer utility for OpenVMS I64 on Integrity servers differs significantly from booting from the InfoServer hardware system traditionally used by OpenVMS Alpha systems or from the InfoServer utility on OpenVMS Alpha systems. For example, while Alpha systems use the Maintenance Operations Protocol (MOP) to request the primary bootstrap file (APB.EXE) to start the boot, the Integrity server console uses the Intel Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) bootstrap protocol in conjunction with the TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS BOOTP server and TFTP. The Integrity server EFI console first loads the primary bootstrap file VMS_LOADER.EFI, which is formatted for EFI compatibility. VMS_LOADER.EFI then uses TFTP to request the primary bootstrap IPB.EXE from the boot server. IPB.EXE is formatted in OpenVMS ODS file structure and is needed for booting the OpenVMS I64 operating system.

To install or upgrade the operating system over the network, OpenVMS I64 systems must use the InfoServer utility that is integrated with the OpenVMS operating system. The InfoServer hardware traditionally used by OpenVMS Alpha systems is not equipped to handle DVD drives required for the OpenVMS I64 distribution media. OpenVMS Alpha systems can use the OpenVMS InfoServer utility or the traditional InfoServer hardware system that is independent of OpenVMS. OpenVMS Alpha systems can boot from the distribution CD on DVD drives (DVD drives support both DVDs and CDs). Table C.1 summarizes the major differences between Alpha and I64 InfoServer booting.

InfoServer Booting: Differences Between Alpha and I64 Systems

ComponentAlphaI64
Downline load protocolMOPPXE (DHCP/BOOTP/TFTP)
Boot fileAPB_version (for example, APB_083)VMS_LOADER.EFI and IPB.EXE (both files are version specific)
Boot serverAny MOP-enabled system with the specified fileOnly those BOOTP servers having the network device MAC address defined in the BOOTP database
LAN serverInfoServer hardware, or InfoServer utility running on OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 or later, or on OpenVMS I64 Version 8.2-1 or laterInfoServer application running on OpenVMS Alpha Version 8.3 or OpenVMS I64 Version 8.2-1 or later

Because of these differences, any procedures used for Alpha systems to set up booting from the InfoServer hardware are not valid for setting up booting from the OpenVMS InfoServer utility. In addition, actions for setting up booting from the OpenVMS I64 InfoServer utility differ from those required for setting up booting from an OpenVMS Alpha InfoServer utility. Table C.2 lists the various actions that need to be performed to enable network booting using the OpenVMS InfoServer utility on OpenVMS I64 or OpenVMS Alpha systems. These actions need be performed only once except where noted.

Procedure for Enabling InfoServer Network Booting

InfoServer Client Setup 
ArchitectureActions RequiredSection

I64 clients only

  1. Determine the LAN I/O card to be used on your local Integrity server for the network boot and report the associated OpenVMS device name, its IP address, and its MAC address to the network administrator responsible for setting up the BOOTP server.

  2. Optionally (and recommended), add this network device as an EFI boot option—this procedure can be repeated on any other system in the LAN that will use the InfoServer server for network booting.

  3. Verify that the network device is supported by EFI as a bootable device.

Section 
InfoServer Utility Setup 
ArchitectureActions Required (You or Network Administrator)Section
I64 or Alpha

Designate at least one OpenVMS system in the LAN as the InfoServer server. Upgrade the system if necessary (OpenVMS I64 must be Version 8.2-1 or later; OpenVMS Alpha must be Version 8.3 or later).

Upgrade instructions in Chapter 6. Prior to upgrading, review Chapter 4, and Chapter 5.

I64 or Alpha

  1. Copy SYS$STARTUP:ESS$LAD_STARTUP.TEMPLATE to SYS$STARTUP:ESS$LAD_STARTUP.DAT and then modify parameters in SYS$STARTUP:ESS$LAD_STARTUP.DAT.

  2. Determine which network device will be used for InfoServer LAD operations.

  3. Copy SYS$STARTUP:ESS$LAST_STARTUP.TEMPLATE to SYS$STARTUP:ESS$LAST_STARTUP.DAT and then modify parameters in SYS$STARTUP:ESS$LAST_STARTUP.DAT.

  4. Add a line to SYS$MANAGER:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM to start the SYS$STARTUP:ESS$LAD_STARTUP.COM file at startup.

  5. If you changed any SYSGEN parameters, run AUTOGEN and reboot; if you did not change SYSGEN parameters, skip the reboot and execute the SYS$STARTUP:ESS$LAD_STARTUP.COM file manually.

  6. Use the InfoServer control program to create a service for the DVD drive.

Section .

Alpha only

Enable MOP on the boot server and then copy APB_083.SYS from the OpenVMS Version 8.3 distribution media to the MOP download database (LAN$DLL, which defaults to MOM$SYSTEM).See the LANCP chapter in HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: A-L.

I64 only

Set up the TCP/IP Services for OpenVMS BOOTP server and TFTP server. (For each new release of OpenVMS I64, update the client entries in the BOOTP database to point to the new version-specific boot file.) The person responsible for setting up the boot server needs information about your InfoServer client. OpenVMS I64 boot files are unique for each version of OpenVMS I64. Latest boot files must be available and referenced in the BOOTP server database. Section .

Note:

The discussion of InfoServer booting in this manual pertains to environments where the boot clients and servers are located in the same LAN. For more complex circumstances, consult HP Customer Support.

Setting Up Your System as an InfoServer Client

To set up your local OpenVMS I64 system as an InfoServer client for network booting, you must perform the following steps. Detailed instructions are provided in the subsections that follow. For OpenVMS Alpha systems, no extra steps are required for setting up an InfoServer client.

  1. Determine the LAN I/O card to be used on your local Integrity server for the network boot. Report the associated OpenVMS device name and its IP address and MAC address to the network administrator responsible for setting up the BOOTP server.

  2. Optionally (and recommended), add the network device as a boot option in the EFI Boot Manager menu.

  3. Verify that the network